Sound dampening

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Mike Peter, Oct 28, 2004.

  1. Mike Peter

    Mike Peter Auditioning

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    I am building a theater room, and had a question keeping the sound from going into the surrounding rooms. Does any body have any suggestions? I was wondering if half inch cork subfloor material would work? It is fairly inexpesive ($1.40 sq/ft.) and comes in 2x3 foot sheets. Any input would be helpful.
    Thanks,
    Mike Peter
     
  2. Jason Ole

    Jason Ole Extra

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    Mike,

    I am also in the process of building a theater room. Ideas that were relayed to me were:

    Building a room within a room
    Applying sound deadening panels to the walls (exensive)
    Adding insulation in the walls (whether interior walls or not)
    Double up on the sheetrock on the walls

    I'm actually just putting the insulation in the walls, I'll have plenty left over from the rest of the addition.

    Jason
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    You should read in the construction/interior area of HTF for threads and discussion related to sound isolation. Your best friend is mass and decoupling. As suggested, double walls, heavy and doubling up on sheetrock, heavy sealed doors, etc. Keeping in the bass is a very difficult proposition, but doable with the right knowledge, patience, and budget.
     
  4. SimiA

    SimiA Second Unit

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    Chris, how about the egg crate foam you see in many sound studios??
    Vb
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    foam acts as an absorber. While this can help slightly with sound isolation, it's primary function is as an absorber for in-room acoustics.

    "egg-crate" foam is usually a cheap, thin compromise. Thick acoustical foams are out there, but are expensive. Keep in mind many foams are closed cell foams, such as many kinds of bedding foams, which are worthless as absorbers.

    Fiberglass board type products are usually the most cost effective for in-room absorption.

    As for studios actually using thin egg-crate type foams, I question their acoustic knowledge.
     

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