Sound absorber advice

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Troy TN, Jun 26, 2002.

  1. Troy TN

    Troy TN Stunt Coordinator

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    I want to get some sound absorbers for my side walls and possibly front wall. I have found some RPG Pro foam and Sonex. Does anyone have a recomendation on which would be better for my RF-7's. Are there others available that are effective? The sonex are sold in sheets of 24" x 48" and has options of 500hz and 1000hz absorbive sheets. Which would be better? I have extreme slap echo in my room.
    Thanks
    Troy
     
  2. Michael Lomker

    Michael Lomker Stunt Coordinator

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    Getting acoustics close to "right" doesn't depend upon which speakers you use but the construction and shape of your particular room.
    If you want to do it very accurately you could get a laptop and buy some software to analyze your room.
    http://www.etfacoustic.com
    Otherwise I would say to buy either of the products. I'm sure that either would be a noticeable improvement. I would put it on the wall behind the speakers as well.
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    describe the room...what's on the walls...windows....flooring or better yet, a picture if you have one.
     
  4. Troy TN

    Troy TN Stunt Coordinator

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    I mainly want to absorb high frequency sound. Not so much the lows. My room walls have movie pictures on them, One large window on the rear wall which I installed black curtains which helped a bunch. But I feel there is still way to much high frequency reflections. The room sounds very bright. I want to try a sound absorbing material at the first reflecton points using a mirror on the side walls and possibly the front wall behind the RF7's as well. I have read that if you can clap your hands and get an echo one needs more absorbtion in the room. My clap echo is terrible.
    I have read others that have installed some sort of sound absorbing material at the first point of reflection had an experiance of night and day sound imaging and depth in their front soundstage.
    I did a search and found Sonex as the Leader in sound panels.
    I know Klipsch can be "bright" to some and when I crank my system, It c be bright. I need to deaden my room from reflections I think.
    I use an Anthem MCA 30 amp with my RF7's.
    Maybe the amp is not a good match for Klipsch? Anyone heard of Anthem and paired with Klipsch?
    I love the clarity and depth I get from it.
    I think it more my room than the amp being to bright. I could be wrong. I will know once I try some absorbers. Thanks again for your input.
     
  5. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Ok...let's first throw some misconceptions out the window. Your amp is fine, and stop agonizing over this match bullcrap. Your speakers...you bought them for whatever reasons, hopefully one of them is that you generally enjoy their sound and possibly their ability to produce large volumes of sound. They're quite efficient and will not tax the capabilities of your amp in the least.
    First of all, if you can, see about centering your audio system between your speakers. The speakers...bring them slightly forward and toe (angle) them in so that they're pointed at where you'll be sitting. You can use a relatively cheap laser pointer to aid in that.
    I'm just trying to get a picture here of your room...
    Back wall: large window that you've now put curtains on. (a heavier curtain will increase the effectiveness of the dampening)
    Side walls: I guess plasterboard with various pictures hanging on it?
    Wall behind the speakers: plasterboard? Nothing on it?
    Floor: ?
    Personally, I don't believe one 'necessarily' has to toss money for dedicated acoustic treatments such as foam. For some, the foam, while effective, can appear hideous. Others like the look and even consider it 'artsy'.
    Let's talk a bit about ways that one can incorporate typical items that would serve purposes such as functionality, decoration, and might be found in a room anyways.
    For the back, where you've got the window, you've got some sort of curtains. If you haven't done so, consider getting some sort of blinds also for the window. Here I'm talking about things like roman blinds, pleated shades, cellular shades. If you don't know what they look like, mosey on over to Home Depot and check them out. An excellent online site, one that I've used and been pleased with their prices and delivery, is www.abwf.com
    That, in conjuction with the curtains you've got up makes for wonderful and practical functionality.
    As far as the sidewalls go, you need to get an idea of the general area where the reflections are coming from. To find that point on the wall, have someone sit in the listening position and using a mirror, move it around till you can see the tweeter. Temporarily, put a real thick beach towel, or a blanket in that area. Tack it up using long thin finishing nails, picture hangers...Later you can replace these temporary things with some sort of woven wall hanging...or sonex...or other options also. If you have other places where you're likely to listen to your music, call them secondary spots, sit there and repeat the process. Now don't forget, the ceiling is also an issue but for now we can deal with the side walls. One doesn't necessarily want to eliminate all reflections and absorb everything. Some sort of blend of absorption, reflection, diffusions generally gives more pleasing sounds.
    You'll find the websites for Sonex and places like that to have information that you should read and become familiar with. Also, I believe www.cardas.com has some useful reading material on this matter. Also check out http://www.acoustisoft.com/ for a useful software program.
    If you're the patient sort of person, you'll get good results and you'll create something quite nice...a good system in a good room. If you've any high end audio places by you, consider visiting them just to observe the rooms. Some have rooms, very much like a living room. Pay attention to what they did, ask questions, enjoy the sound...take what you observed and see about implementing similar techniques.
     
  6. Daryl Furkalo

    Daryl Furkalo Second Unit

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    Don't forget about ceiling reflections as well. When you are using your mirror to isolate the first reflection point, take a look at the ceiling as well. What kind of flooring do you have?
     
  7. Troy TN

    Troy TN Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the indepth response.

    I have brand new berber carpet on the floor. The side walls are sheetrock with nothing on them but reflectve movie posters in frames facing each other. So I think the first reflection point will be my starting point.

    Never thought of the ceiling. I will have to experiment wiht that as well.

    My front wall has a 65" Mitsubishi HD set built into the wall with the components. The rest of the front wall is the same as the side walls. sheet rock.

    I will experimant with the mirror and see if I get any change by adding to the reflective areas where the mirror shows the speaker.

    Thanks again for the helpful info
     
  8. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    You can add additional treatments, be they hangings or whatever if one is not enough. The degree of attenuation, i can't up with the word i'm looking for here, is dependent upon the nature of the material. Flat stuff isn't as good as woven, bumpy stuff. It's a question of absorption/diffraction. No doubt you should be able to find something to complement your existing decorating scheme either at stores, or even ebay. Also, if you have bookcases, with books of course, they can serve to break up/absorb sound, but I wouldn't necessarily opt for that on a 1st reflection basis. Some people have demonstrated some interesting creativity by using acoustic batts (like insulation) and covering them with fabric, stapling around. I'd ask Martha Stewart about that but she seems to be preoccupied.

    Yes ceilings can also be treated. After you've dealt with the obvious stuff, we can then look at the room corners and the spots where the walls and ceilings meet.
     
  9. sam_canavo

    sam_canavo Stunt Coordinator

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    Sorry but I had to like that Martha comment
     
  10. Frank_S

    Frank_S Supporting Actor

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    IF you are a DIY kind of person, check out www.audioasylum.com and go to the tweak section. Perform a search under "Room Treatments" and you'll get lots of helpful info. I have Echobusters panels in my room but there are a bit pricey.
    Also check out www.acousticsfirst.com good luck! [​IMG]
     

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