Sony's Digital Video Recorder DHG-HDD500

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by TerryL, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. TerryL

    TerryL Auditioning

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    Can anybody tell me why Sony's DVR - DHG-HDD500 which is a stand alone High Definition video recorder does NOT have an HDMI input?? The recorder is designed to accept a raw coaxial cable input and you have to insert a "smart card" (provided by the cable company) to un-encrypt the signal and then you run an HDMI out to the TV. That is fine if the cable company actually has those type of cards.
    But wouldn't it make much more sense to have an HDMI input so that you can run your HDMI outs from HD cable box or HD satellite receiver into the Sony unit itself, then from the unit run the HDMI to the TV. I don't understand with all of Sony's technology and wisdom that they would go to the trouble to make a stand alone Hi Def Digital Video Recorder and NOT have an HDMI input in the back?
     
  2. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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    No, it wouldn't make more sense. It's completely impractical to do this, for a couple reasons:
    - HDMI out is encrypted, and is not licensed for recording devices. The whole reason behind DVI/HDMI-w/HDCP in the first place was to prevent digital recordings from this interface.
    - Even if you could get around the encryption, the amount of data you'd have to store is enormous. 100+x more than the MPEG stream. You'd have to do HD-MPEG compression in real time, that's just way too expensive.

    The way they did it is the obvious way, the cheapest & most efficient. It makes sense to just tune & store the incoming transport streams without having to do any recompression. All major cable companies are required to support Cablecards.
     
  3. TerryL

    TerryL Auditioning

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    I didn't realise the HDMI output to the TV from the cable and/or satellite receiver was still encrypted. I thought the cable box (or sat receiver) would un-crypt it before it makes it's way to the TV.
     
  4. Nick

    Nick Second Unit

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    I bought this unit 7 months ago and absolutely loving it. I know it lacks A/V inputs but the picture and sound quality kind of made up for it. I mainly use it for recording HD contend of the air and cable. May be someday in the future when the HD-DVD or Blu-ray recorder became affordable (like $200.00) I will pick one up and transfer it on their media if that's possible and hopefully that they don't encrypt the signal.

    I just love the fact that I don't have Disc laying around once I'm done recording it. With this unit I just delete what I watched. Just like Tivo with no monthly fee.
     
  5. videobruce

    videobruce Stunt Coordinator

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    It doesn't have a 1394 port either. [​IMG]
    but, unlike the Goldstar (or is it Samsung), you can correctly record an analog channel w/o the chroma delay.
     
  6. Terri Chu

    Terri Chu Extra

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    I agree. Their newer HD camcorders have non copy protected HDMI outputs.
     
  7. videobruce

    videobruce Stunt Coordinator

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    Very easy; what else does Sony own??
    a movie studio...........................

    They went out of their way so you couldn't copy or even attempt to transfer HD material out of that box.
    That is including even changing out the HDD. [​IMG]
     

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