Sony SAWM40 mods

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by SteveTomassetti, Mar 4, 2002.

  1. SteveTomassetti

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    I have the Sony SAWM40 sub and read awhile ago about some modifications that can be made to this sub to improve performance. Can someone tell me these exact mods please?

    Thanks
     
  2. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Pack it full (50% or so is probably fine) of polyfill.

    Other mods include driver swaps and such, but I don't have one so I can't really say.

    Good Luck -

    - CM
     
  3. Johnny Mac

    Johnny Mac Stunt Coordinator

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  4. EricHaas

    EricHaas Supporting Actor

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    Steve:

    I have this sub and am in the process of modding it with polyfill right now (it is sitting out on my patio with the poly foam drying at the moment). I will post back and let you know the result. I will say that something needs to be done to tighten up the base though. It is way too loose. Whether or not this work remains to be heard.
     
  5. keir

    keir Stunt Coordinator

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    it works for everyone i think. most people notice a huge improvement. im going from the reviews at audioreview. lately almost everyone who posts a review said that they have used the mod and had good success. theres some instructions on those reviews i wrote also if you need some help with it (search for the name keir). its a simple mod anyway and definately worth the time and money.
     
  6. SteveTomassetti

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    Thanks, I'm looking forward to the results being posted.
     
  7. Mike_A

    Mike_A Stunt Coordinator

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    i've yet to try the polyfill mod on my sa-wm40 simply because i've heard the "huge improvement" that many are claiming really isn't that huge. i may get around to it one day, but would like to see more positive results here at HTF where I tend to trust people's opinions more.
     
  8. EricHaas

    EricHaas Supporting Actor

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    I completed the mod tonight. First of all, make sure that you screw ALL 8 of the driver screws back in until you are red in the face. The first test tone I played I heard an awful rattling noise. What corrected it was that one screw needed a final turn.

    The mod *seriously* tightened up the base. And I mean night and day. And it may have diminished the output at extreme low frequencies as well. I defintely felt I had to turn the sub level up from the -4 setting where it has rested for a while. (Note to self: I also need to recalibrate.) At the zero setting, I felt output almost comparable, but it isn't boomy anymore at all. I think it may have lost some of its newbie "wow" effect for HT, but it sounds much better now. I can even use it for music, which is a definite plus since I have bookshelf speakers for mains.

    BTW, I used something called "Great Stuff Triple Expanding" polyeurythene foam from Home Depot. It is a spray foam that expands as it dries, which takes about 2 hours +. I filled the cabinet about 1/3 full with the foam, lining all six internal walls, except I stayed away from the port opening.

    Do this mod if the boominess of the Sony bothers you. I know it bothered me a lot.
     
  9. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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  10. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    The thing about using poly is that it's very pourous, and it absorbs the waves in the cab and makes it look bigger to the driver, letting it breathe.

    Does this "Great Stuff" work the same way?

    I've used that stuff to fill spaces in walls and such for insulation, but I wonder if it's appropriate for audio baffles. I ask because when I used it it dried with a shiny surface, which makes me think it would reflect more than it would absorb...

    BTW, I'm just asking, no flame or anything.

    Respectfully -

    - CM
     
  11. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    I think there was a booboo made here.

    Think of a cheap pillow ...that's the stuff you want to use.

    Think of caulking ....you DON"T want to use that.

    The stuff should be easy to just break out and discard.

    Brent
     
  12. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    I wondered what Eric meant by
     
  13. Andy Hong

    Andy Hong Auditioning

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    Just to clarify thing. Is it best to use pillow stuffing material or expanding foam? The expanding foam doesn't make sense since it's fairly dense which mean you will loose air volume
     
  14. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Stuffing.
     
  15. EricHaas

    EricHaas Supporting Actor

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    Thanks for the feedback. When this stuff dries, it ends having the consistently of styrofoam. It isn't really like rubber caulk, but probably isn't nearly as pouress as the other stuff you guys are referring to. It is removable however. Does anyone have a specific product name that I should look for? We don't have walmart out here.
     
  16. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    Just pillow stuffing, quilt batting, basically just a big mass of cotton-ball type stuff.. Don't use cotton balls, though. Don't use anything that could fall away and come in contact with the woofer.

    Audio-specific stuff is the same stuff, just marked up in price.

    Or fiberglass insulation, just enough to hide the walls of the box from the woofer. (Legal: Wear Gloves)
     
  17. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Go to any fabric store and look for polyester pillow stuffing. Should be very easy to find, and cheap. You REALLY do not need to stuff the cabinet with 50%, you don't want to KILL the back wave, you just want to reduce it. You should only need a small amount to cover the inner surfaces about 1" deep, depending on the density of your fill. (keep it away from any power wires also). I used sheet that I could cut to size and staple directly to the inner walls on my DIY sealed sub. It was easier than the loose stuff, but not as dense.
     
  18. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

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    John - I thought the same about not over-stuffing....but....

    My Center has good bass down to 52Hz, dual 6.5's. I was curious about it's guts so I opened it...it was STUFFED, man, big time.

    I thought it was strange...

    But I agree, 50% or LESS for the sub.
     
  19. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    It depends on the density of the stuffing. If it fills the enclosure doesn't matter, it's how much air can still move inside.
     
  20. EricHaas

    EricHaas Supporting Actor

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    Actually, the Sony comes with one thin sheet of stuffing which is adhered to the rear wall. Based on what I have read, some people are doing little more than adding this same thing to the other internal walls. I still have to decide if I want to remove this foam, because the sub does sound much better now. I guess I will trust everyone that stuffing it with the proper material will give me the best of both worlds: that is, tightening up the sub without dimishing its volume and low extension.
     

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