Sony KV32HV600

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Joel_A, Sep 6, 2002.

  1. Joel_A

    Joel_A Auditioning

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    We just purchased a Sony Wega KV32HV600 and well im kinda a n00bie to this stuff and I need a little info about how to watch dvds at their highest quality without the black bars you get from a 16:9 dvd. I realize that there is no HD tuner built in but that it is HD ready. What high definition reciever do you guys recommend? What config should I run? Right now im running a Yamaha HtR5490 A/V reciever. GIve me some ideas about how to set this up.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Joel, I'm not sure which is the question. But the Sony has a raster-collapsing function that squeezes all scanning lines into a 16:9 window—which is the mode you would be in to watch HDTV (after you get an ATSC tuner). This means you will always have black bars, as the Sony is 4:3 natively, but the ATSC specifications for HDTV are 16:9.

    Furthermore, 16:9-encoded DVDs are to be watched in the Sony's 16:9 mode, just the same as you would for HDTV. And aspect ratios of films vary, from the 1.37:1 Academy ratio which dominated before the widescreen era, to today's more commonly used 1.85:1 and 2.35:1 aspect ratios.

    Home Theater Forum's mission statement declares that this is a pro-original aspect ratio site. We are opposed to pan-and-scan presentations of widescreen material. Which means that if you have a 4:3 set, the black bars framing a widescreen presentation are the way to go. Just watch the film in a darkened room if the bars distract you. Pay attention to the film and not to the bars. (Even if you had a native 16:9 screen, there would still be black bars on 2.35:1 and wider films.)
     
  3. Joel_A

    Joel_A Auditioning

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    Well I wanted a recommendation for a high definition reciever. Now would a high definition reciever allow teh set to show the full quality of dvds? That 1080i or whatever. Is there a site that explains all of this?

    Thanks all
     
  4. Randy_T

    Randy_T Stunt Coordinator

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    No...You need a progressive scan dvd player. Are you using your local cable company or a "dish" for your tv reception? Are there any local channels that are broadcasting HD?
    For more information on how HDTV works and the equipment you need, go HERE
     
  5. Joel_A

    Joel_A Auditioning

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    What progressive scan dvd player and hd reciever do you guys recommend?

    Thx
     
  6. Jimmy vb

    Jimmy vb Stunt Coordinator

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    learn to love the black bars--they mean you are seeing more of the picture and you are seeing what you were intended to see. They take getting used to--but it is well worth it rather than chopping off large sections of the picture.

    The best way to compensate for them is to get a tv large enough so that you don't have them--OR, you can get a 16x9 tv with decent stretch modes and never really have to worry about them except on 2:35:1 stuff.

    Learn to love the bars.

    I recommend the Sony 715P progressive scan dvd player. It can be had for under $200, has a nice feature set and puts out a good picture. It will hold the fort until hd-dvd comes along.
     
  7. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    The Panasonic RP-91, and RP82 are both very good progressive scan players, I personally have not tried the RP-82, but I havent heard a bad thing yet from someone who has, and the RP-91 is very sweet and worth every penny.

    as well like most people ahve said, you will have to live witht he black bars.... there is no way around it.
     

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