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Sony Grand Wega? Good buy at $5300??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Anthony Moore, Jul 3, 2002.

  1. Anthony Moore

    Anthony Moore Supporting Actor

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    I was wondering if this TV is a good buy at $5300. It's HUGE, and looks great at my local shop.

    Are there other TV's out there at this price that look better? bigger?

    Or are there some out there that look about as good that are cheaper?

    What are some advantages and disadvantages of it being "LCD"? Does it make a difference? Is LCD a good thing for televisions?

    Any info would be appreciated..thanks
     
  2. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    Anthony,
    The Grand Wega came out at $8000, but dropped pretty quickly and can now be found at most shops for $6000, so $5300 is a decent deal. The stand that Sony makes for it is ridiculously overpriced, so I'd look for something else to put it on.

    About the Grand Wega: on an HD or DVD input this is a smokin' TV... devastating detail and clarity. Regular cable or satellite doesn't look as good as on some other TVs in my opinion, but the picture on this TV with the right signal is outstanding. It's a Sony, and Sony is notorious for low contrast levels, so colors are a little washed out when compared to other brands, but it's a great looking TV. Other advantages are that it is very lightweight and thin, and is a tabletop type TV, the only 60" RPTV you can say that about. Because it is LCD, it will not have convergence problems down the line that all CRT-based RPTVs are prone to. The only types of TV that will rival the detail available on this TV are plasma ($$$$) and DLP, which has its own bunch of problems.

    Biggest disadvantage: you need to replace the bulb every so often. I guess the bulb is about $200ish, and count on replacing it every other year. It is also a rear-projection TV, so the viewing angle is somewhat limited, but no more so than any other RPTV out there. Hope this helps!.
     
  3. Dean McManis

    Dean McManis Agent

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    I own the Sony KL-W9000 50", which is the LCD predecessor to the 60" Grand Wega.

    I love this display. When it was first released, it was sold as a presentation display, and at $17K it was destined for only corporate/event use.

    But the price dropped, and I watched it go down over a few years to $11K, then $7K then $5500. And when it dropped to $2200 new, I bought one.

    The KL-W9000 was based on the same 1066 X 480 panels from Sony's LCD front projector W400Q, but in addition to HDTV input, it also handled computer resolutions.

    As far as bulb life goes, mine was rated at 6000hrs, and I'm currently at around 4650 hours after 3 years. The picture still looks bright, and I haven't seen any color variation for reds that I've heard of with some UHP bulbs.

    I think that the black level and contrast is very good for a LCD display. MUCH better than the $12K 52" Panasonic DLP RPTVs, but not quite as deep as CRT displays.

    I don't mind the difference, but you should look at them side-by-side to see what you think.

    The advantages of the LCD design is VGA input. Which some CRT RPTVs have, and I'm not sure if the Grand Vega does.
    And light weight. At 65lbs, my RPTV is about 300lbs+ lighter than a CRT RPTV is with a comparable screen size.
    And at 22" deep it looks VERY thin, like a plasma display.
    And the big reason that I bought the LCD RPTV was that there is no real chance of CRT burn-in.

    Having owned a CRT RPTV before, as well as several CRT FPTVs I know that you can be careful, and not crank the brightness and contrast to avoid CRT burn-in. But with LCD, there are no worries, and you don't need to deal with convergence. Just replace the bulb whenever it goes out.

    As much as I like my Sony RPTV, I think that the current $5K+ price of the Grand Wega is still a bit steep. There is deep discounting going on with CRT RPTVs now because of new models and connection standards coming out, so with the good looking picture, it would be tough to justify the 2X+ price of teh LCD RPTV over a regular DTV compliant CRT RPTV.

    Also there are DLP and LCOS RPTVs coming out later this year for probably the same or less money that share the advantages of digital RPTV displays, but have a tighter pixel gap and better contrast.

    And for $5300 you can get a really nice front projector that can be portable, or ceiling mounted to give you more room space, and a much larger picture. The only downside is shorter bulb life and higher bulb cost, so generaly I suggest that if you go the front projection route, that you keep your old tube TV for watching news and ordinary TV, and use the FPTV for movies and events to cut bulb usage to a minimum.

    -Dean.
     

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