Sono end caps

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rick Thomas, Apr 2, 2002.

  1. Rick Thomas

    Rick Thomas Agent

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    With the end caps of my sono sub. I'm having 3/4" inside the tube at each end. I was wondering if you guys just glue them or do you also nail or screw them also?Thanks
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    I glued, nailed (with short 1" tacking nails) and caulked.
     
  3. Ron D Core

    Ron D Core Stunt Coordinator

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    You want to make the stringest most secure end caps you can, ive seen many with tripled up 3/4 MDF, with at least one on the inside, the ones on the outside sould be butted against the outside edge of the tube. If your clearances are tight enough, woodglue will work, there are some types that wil expand to fill in the gaps. But to really hold the ends on well, you might want to run maybe three all-thread bars across and attach them to the endcaps and bolt them tight, thus squezing the caps to the tube. Just dont do it too tight of course.
     
  4. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I am using triple caps with 1.5" plugs and .75" cap. Just made the cuts yesterday. Nice and snug in the tube. I wanted to make this sub as perfect as possible the first time. No "I should have"'s.
     
  5. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    The tubes are lined with a thin plastic membrane so standard wood glues aren't a good idea. Use a thin bead of caulk around the edge of the endcap as a lubricant when installing it. Then tack the cap in place with some brad nails. Finally put a thick bead of caulk inside the tube where the wall of the tube meets the endcap
     
  6. Mike Dr

    Mike Dr Stunt Coordinator

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    personally, I decided against using nails... I tried some test-nails.. and wehnever I put a brad nail into a side of MDF it would crack... I just used silicone caulk and I have 4 all-thread rods running through my tube that hold it together.. i also have extremely tight clearances (I had to literally hang on the endcap to get it into the tube)

    If you're gonna go the thread-rod way, dont forget to use something to dampen the rods since they will resonate in the tube (i just used polyfill to stuff around them)
     
  7. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    I plan to do as Pat did and use tack nails. To avoid spliting the MDF, just predrill a small hole first. Problem solved. I'd rather go this route then run all-thread thru the tube. Also, I plan on using 3-1x2s around the inside from top to bottom. This will allow for a little side bracing and then the end caps will rest on top of the 1x2. Then I can nail from the top down into the 1x2.
    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  8. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    We're using a nail gun with 16 gauge nails and aren't having any problems with MDF splitting.

    Brian
     
  9. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    TW,

    could you scuff the inside so the wood glue would bond better? In my design I am planning to glue the fabric ribbing material on and on the tip of the rim to keep it from freying and to give it a clean nice look. By doing this I can't use nails or anything in the sides of the tube. I will have to rely on the adhesive(whichever will work best) to hold the cap in place.

    Any recommendations...liquid nails, wood glue, adhesive, caulking, etc...???
     
  10. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    The plastic liner peels off real easy. Just use your finger nail. I peeled mine off in the areas I plan to use glue.
    As for glue, I'd go with liquid nails. Get the proper glue for the material your working with and your good to go.
    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  11. Alexis

    Alexis Stunt Coordinator

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    I think the thicker liquid nails would work a little better than standard wood glue for helping to seal the sub. It might stick a little better too. It just takes a little longer to dry.
     
  12. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    You're only gluing to the first layer of paper; so I think brads, combined with large bead of caulk inside the tube is the best solution

    I use a small brad nailer. It countersinks the heads into the tube no problems with splitting the MDF or issues with any fabric

    Siliconized acrylic caulk sticks well to the inner walls of the tube, doesn't require any tube wall prep, cleans up with H2O.

    Liquid nails off gasses VOCs so I prefer not to use it.

    Ron-P

     
  13. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Thanks Thomas, I will not add the bracing. But, wouldn't this also apply to using all-thread rods thru the cylinder?
    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  14. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    I think Thomas didn't want the 1x2's along the sides of the tube (while in the vertical position). But if you moved the 1x2s off the walls and did what you initially proposed, there's no harm. I did that with Sunoub I, but did not do it with Sunosub II. I couldn't discern any differences between the two.

    Some people enjoy over-building, but I don't think you need the 1x2's. It's just added complexity that isn't really needed.
     
  15. Frank Kanyak

    Frank Kanyak Stunt Coordinator

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    I bought some of the Gorilla Glue to glue my endcaps together(I am going to do this tomorrow night after work) and to secure my 6" port. I was going to just Gorilla GLue the end caps to the inside of the Sonotube. The guy at Lowe's swears by this stuff. Should I still nail or put some 3/4 inch particle screws every 4 inches as a precaution??? Going to order my Tempest very soon. Thanks for the help Patrick I'm going with your dimensions you recommened. The WAF is going to be surprised(This is bigger than I even imagined), I'm doing all the work in the garage and when she's at work!!! Hopefully she'll see the end result by next week!!!
     
  16. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Ron-P
    I'm a bit of a purest [​IMG]
    Don't attach anything to the walls of the cylinder itself except for a bit of hot glue if you're using foam damping.
    [​IMG]
    You can use the threaded rod if you want. My experience is that it offers no added benefit given properly constructed endcaps (thick/ridged), unless the endcaps are huge 30+" diameter.
    The great thing about tube subs is the lack of need for added bracing/stiffening/etc. Don't think I'm anti-bracing, I'm not. But I only use it in situations where it's needed.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Nice construction job Thomas[​IMG] I am dying for Saturday to get here so I can get started on mine.
    Slightly off topic: I look at this sonotube material and really wonder how this thing is going to work with just a cardboard tube that is 1/4" thick. They recommend the best possible end caps, but the tube itself is cardboard. Does not make much sense.
    Also, does the polyfill really make a sizeable improvement?
    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  18. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Sonotube forms concrete...it's plenty strong.
     
  19. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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  20. rodneyH

    rodneyH Supporting Actor

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    Just like Thomas said, it makes sense that sense the sonotube is round the pressure is distributed equally to every point of the cylinder, so it doesn't need to be as strong, the only area that that changes is the end caps, thus the very over built end caps that people tend to favor. but, square enclosure has different pressures on every point, so it needs to be stronger. It is somewhat analogus to the old squeezing an egg trick, you can apply very high amounts of pressure without breaking it, because of the way it is formed. I am sure there is a better example out there, but hopefully you get the idea
     

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