Solder or crimp?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Tsutsui, Apr 29, 2002.

  1. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wondering if soldering with 2% silver (rest lead/tin) is ok for HT. (Deans silver solder)

    I got some silver audioquest spades that I can't crimp with a normal tool. So I've soldered them to 12 gauge home depot wire. I also solder the speaker wire to my drivers and will solder the wire to my plate amp when I get it.

    Most of the reason is I don't have the money for crimping parts and tools.

    I just read that crimping provides a better connection on some guys site due to air tight and flawless finish....

    I've been soldering for years due to my electric RC car racing so am experienced with making connections. It wouldn't be a problem if I had to resolder a driver or terminal as I resolder battery and motor connections all the time.

    I just keep seeing everyone using crimping and connectors in home theater. Does the tin/lead solder affect sound?
     
  2. Justin Bowser

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2002
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would imagine that some people say that a crimped connection is superior because they can't solder! I'm sure that statement will probably get me a good flaming but I have some very good nomex drawers on! ;-) I have been an electronic technician since the mid 70s and back then everybody in the trade had to be proficient in the soldering arts but most techs I have seen in the past 10 years couldn't solder their way out of a paper bag...

    My preference is soldering then covering the joint with heat shrink tubing. Keeps air and moisture from the connection and provides some minimal strain relief.

    I used to use a lot of crimp connectors under the hood on the ol' hot-rod but after having to go back in a year or two later and troubleshoot intermittent electrical gremlins I don't crimp there anymore either. And yes, I do have the proper crimp tools.

    Just my two cents,

    Justin Bowser, CET
     
  3. Chris_Freeman

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2002
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll jump in the fire with Justin on this one. I think soldering is preferable , however it is not as easy as putting a wire into a connector and squeezing. I competely agree with you Justin that this has become somewhat of a lost art. The only people who use solder are the ones who have to. Personally I like solder.
     
  4. ColinM

    ColinM Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    Messages:
    2,050
    Likes Received:
    0
    Solder for me, too.

    Long live Associated!
     
  5. Cam S

    Cam S Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dean's makes some pretty good stuff, especially their Ultra plugs, way better than the litespeed junk that always come disconnected during a race.

    I've been into R/C racing for about 6 years now (I'm 21) and have had a total of about 6 cars since I started. I'm racing an HPI RS4 Pro, the original and in my opinion the best one, the thing is easy as hell to work on and is so simple to setup and drive fast. I also have a 1/8th scale Thunder Tiger Mirage VSpec nitro buggy, also a great car that has given me next to no trouble in all the races I've had it in.
     
  6. RaphaelZ

    RaphaelZ Agent

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2002
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Definately go with the solder. Superior conduction because every surface is conected. And as far as I can see, a well soldered connection is pretty, darned air-tight.

    Raphael
     
  7. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, I feel a lot better soldering my connections now.
    Nice to hear another RC car enthusiast on the HTF.
    I have an RS4 Pro2 with penguin woven graphite chassis and upgrades. I have an RS4 Racer2 with super chassis, motor saver air filter, paris pipe, CEN .12 racing header, and a $370 Futaba 3PJS transmitter.
    I modified the internals of my 12 OS CV-X, took off the pullstart, port and polished the sleeve, and ported the crankshaft, knifed the cone-rod, and ported the header.
    My car can compete with yokomos and mugens if I stay off the boards. I've been thinking of getting the Nitro TC3 but the hobby got expensive and time consuming.
    I'm more into DIY audio now [​IMG]
     
  8. Cam S

    Cam S Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes Received:
    0
    R/C racing expensive, hell ya. I've probably got 5 grand into them easily.
     
  9. Chuck_C

    Chuck_C Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2001
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Solder rules! Even when I do use a crimp connector, I put a little flux on the wire before crimping, and then solder it after making the crimp. It makes for a good electrical connection without the problem of corrosion and oxidation.
     
  10. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
    FWIW, I was involved in an ongoing UL/CSA/USCG and occasionally mil spec testing of wire, wire connectors, connections, etc., and a cold fusion weld (crimp) was superior in every measurable way that we were required to test for. This is why it's the standard in the electrical distribution, auto, appliance, etc., industries, not because it may be cheaper. Product/safety liability and all that jazz. A screw on ring tongue connection was second.

    That said, the cost of the proper crimpers/dies isn't justifiable to all but the anal, well to do, or a business that can write it off, and some mil specs still required soldered/potted.

    Anyway, I solder with 2% silver where I can't conveniently use a ring tongue connector.

    GM
     
  11. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    Soldering makes the best electrical connection of any commonly used means.
    But do not use plumbing flux or acid core solder. Rosin core solder has the flux (rosin) built in so no additional flux is needed. Also any kind of solder makes just as good a connection. 63-37 or 60-40 solder has been used for electronics over the ages because the lower melting point reduces the chance of heat damage to the components.
    Silver solder has gained in popularity in response to the lead poisoning scare, at a cost of a higher melting point.
    Crimping or plug in connections continue to be used where all risk of heat damage has to be avoided.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  12. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes Received:
    0
    I use something close to 60-40 with 2% silver.

    It's not expensive, and lets me be able to say "I used silver solder".

    I use a 60 watt weller which was the best iron out of 3 I had. A craftsman soldering gun literally fell apart after 1 weeks use. The bit on the weller has lasted a long time.

    I've cleaned it and re-tinned it after each use.
     
  13. Jeffrey_S

    Jeffrey_S Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2002
    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    0
    My vote is to crimp and THEN solder where possible. This gives the best conductive joint with the advantages of solder. If you can't crimp, then a good mechanical connection, followed by a good solder joint should be fine.

    Jeff
     

Share This Page