1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

Solar Eclipse 2017 preparations

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Sam Posten, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    20,489
    Likes Received:
    2,687
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    Friend has an 8" telescope with solar filter and phone mount. He attached my iPhone and shot the eclipse early on.
    IMG_0634.JPG
     
    Sam Posten likes this.
  2. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    24,697
    Likes Received:
    3,488
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
  3. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    20,489
    Likes Received:
    2,687
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    This one's meta. My buddy took all the good shots at max local eclipse.. IMG_0687.JPG
     
    Sam Posten likes this.
  4. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Director

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2001
    Messages:
    20,267
    Likes Received:
    4,954
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    There was strong cloud cover on the sunny side in Albany for the eclipse, so I was able to snap some pics with my cellphone without any filters. This one probably came out best:
    20170821_eclipse.

    This was within a minute or two of the peak, which in my area was about 66 percent. The building on the right is the Alfred E. Smith State Office Building.
     
  5. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 1999
    Messages:
    13,984
    Likes Received:
    2,777
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Dave, Sam, great shots! You can see the sun spots in those. Adam, where I was there was no cloud cover, so I didn't have anyway to diffuse the shots like you did. Cool you got the building in there for reference!

    Cameron, a while ago, I was looking at the Canon eclipse bundles and they had a zoom lens and filter combo for shooting the eclipse, it sold out. Wish I went for it. The filter was a Hoya and I think it worked out to about $100 for the filter which while still high, seemed reasonable and something to keep around for future use. I figure now that it's over, a good deal might be had for those filters.
     
    Sam Posten likes this.
  6. Message #46 of 56 Aug 22, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2017
    Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,936
    Likes Received:
    783
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    Lined up and GIFed

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  7. JohnRice

    JohnRice Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2000
    Messages:
    10,143
    Likes Received:
    841
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    A Mile High
    Real Name:
    John
    I should have gotten a solar filter and shot it. Stupid. It was about 96% right here at work, just a little less than Cameron's shots. I know a lot of people who traveled North and saw/shot it.
     
  8. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,936
    Likes Received:
    783
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    I was debating up until a month ago (this thread certainly helped nudge me to, so HT to Sam). The people who spent days planning their shots in various environments got some great stuff. Maybe I'll be more ambitious in 28 years. :)
     
    Sam Posten likes this.
  9. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 1999
    Messages:
    13,984
    Likes Received:
    2,777
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    That's a great gif Cameron!

    Maybe it's because we're still excited after this eclipse, but I'm thinking it's only 7 years till the next total eclipse that passes from Mexico's west coast up through the US from Texas to New York and the lower edge of Canada along Montreal and Toronto and New Brunswick. So I'll plan my gear purchases in anticipation. :)
     
    Cameron Yee likes this.
  10. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 1998
    Messages:
    13,834
    Likes Received:
    2,078
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Great job, guys! I love that GIF, Cameron. Sam, that series of three shots look terrific, too.

    As it turned out, I made the right decision in not buying anything to shoot this. We had cloud cover here over the eclipse, so I would have wasted my money. I sure am glad I can live vicariously through your shots, though.
     
    Sam Posten likes this.
  11. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,936
    Likes Received:
    783
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
  12. RobertR

    RobertR Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 1998
    Messages:
    10,296
    Likes Received:
    656
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Viewing a total solar eclipse had been on my bucket list for some time. When I heard about the upcoming event, I chose Wyoming for viewing it, based on the proximity to my family in Denver, and the likelihood of good viewing conditions there. Initially, my focus was on Casper, Wyoming, but I settled on the small town of Glendo (population 205). Like Casper, it is on the center line of the zone of totality, and it’s a full hour’s driver time closer to Denver. I visited the town’s website, and learned that they would allow parking at the local airport, and would have both food and portable restrooms available.

    I had received a number of dire warnings about the number of people who would be traveling from Colorado to Wyoming. Based on this, I decided to leave my mother’s house at 2 am the morning of the eclipse. This proved to be a wise decision on my part. I encountered little traffic, and made the 200 mile drive in two hours and 45 minutes. As I approached the Glendo exit, I felt momentary trepidation, as there was quite a long line of cars backed up. This passed quickly, however, as I saw that there was a huge open field, and the hundreds of cars came nowhere near to filling it up. I sat back, relaxed, took a nap, and ate some of the food and water I had brought.

    As dawn broke, I could see that it was a PERFECT day, not a cloud to be seen. In addition, there was a constant cool breeze, which ventilated the car and kept things quite comfortable even sitting inside. I checked out the vendors, and watched the preparations by people with sophisticated cameras equipped with sun filters. One man from Boston was particularly enthusiastic and well prepared. I myself did not bring any special photographic equipment, as I knew that nothing I could take could possibly match the quality of the pictures taken by others. I had also read that fumbling around with a camera during the eclipse would actually detract from the experience of viewing it. Even the man from Boston said that he would only take a couple of pictures during totality, and then simply watch. My sole viewing preparation consisted of ISO certified eclipse glasses, purchased at Lowes (which was listed as a retailer selling the “real deal”) for two dollars. As the sun rose, I tested them out again (I had also done this immediately after buying them). When looking at anything but the sun, nothing could be seen, which is as it should be. Looking directly at the sun was very comfortable, and I could clearly see the sun’s disk.

    Shortly after 10 am, the man from Boston announced that the show would begin in around 15 minutes. Around 10:22, I put my glasses on, and could clearly see a small “bite” taken out of the sun in the upper right corner. Over the next hour or so, I checked the progress of the occlusion from time to time. The disk of the sun was gradually reduced to a smaller and smaller crescent. Daylight took on a diminished, eerie quality, quite unlike any cloud cover, sunset, dawn, or twilight. The anticipation mounted. Eight minutes before totality, I watched the sun continuously. As the last sliver of the sun shrank to nothing, I took the glasses off.

    What I saw was magnificent, fantastic, and awe inspiring. The disk of the sun was covered in jet black, surrounded by the blazing corona, extending hundreds of thousands of miles into space. The sky was darkened in a way unmatched by anything else. Everyone has seen a sunrise and a sunset, but what I saw was a 360 degree sunset, ie a sunset EVERYWHERE on the horizon. The crowd cheered and applauded. Eventually, Baily’s beads and the Diamond Ring began to appear, and I knew the period of totality was over.

    No cosmological event in my lifetime has ever come close to matching what I witnessed first-hand. It is a wonderful memory I will carry with me to the end of my days.
     
  13. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    24,697
    Likes Received:
    3,488
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
    Scott Merryfield likes this.
  14. Message #54 of 56 Aug 26, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2017
    David Norman

    David Norman Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2001
    Messages:
    4,440
    Likes Received:
    1,324
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    Missed this thread earlier. Locally we had 99% so since I;m free now and who knows if I'll be around for the 2024 event so Bucket List now with one less item-- I drove 75 miles south to almost dead center of totality. A little Lake Camp/Convention center run by a Regional Presby Group outside the bigger cities so traffic wasn't even too bad by avoiding I-85 -- almost 2:37 totality. For a $15 donation they provided parking, they fed us a nice BBQ lunch, free water and Southern tea. If I'm able I think I'll visit my Sister in Law in Canada in 2024 since they're almost center cut for a 4+ minute totality

    Other being hot, the weather cooperated and zero clouds during the Beginning to about 45 minutes after totality.
    I wish I had a real camera setup and my workarounds didn't turn out very good with a tripod and my old simple digital camera and a filter.
    Full totality with the corona was really bizarre and beyond interesting. With the remaining sunlight bouncing off the sky and clouds it never got Midnight dark, but almost like 15-30 minutes after official sunset with just enough light to still see. It was still amazing to see how quickly it got dimmed the last 30-60 seconds and how much light returned within seconds of the end of totality.

    I stayed about 30 minutes after totality but the weather was starting to change and at 3:15pm I figured traffic was going to be pretty bad. By the time I crossed I-85 it was a parking lot so I bypassed it and went the long way on the backroads. 120 minutes down, 2.5 hrs back on what should normally be 90 minutes so I count myself lucky. If I had tried to go I-85 judging by reports it would have taken an extra 90 minutes+. My normal 30 minutes on I85 would have taken over 2-2.5 hrs.


    Not sure this will work, but the best photos I could work out with my simple camera.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/shares/p91sH6
     
    Sam Posten likes this.
  15. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    24,697
    Likes Received:
    3,488
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
    You did great with the gear you had David, nice job! Thanks for your write up!
     
  16. David Norman

    David Norman Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2001
    Messages:
    4,440
    Likes Received:
    1,324
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    After playing with some of the edit/contrast/white level they do look a little better at least thumbnail sizes. Nothing that would look
    good on prints, but with 10yp 2MP point and shoot at least it;s at least something to look at. Still 10x better than what I got on a smartphone with technically a better resolution camera.

    Being there was worth every second of getting there. Wish a group of us could have gone, but even going solo was memorable. Went through a partial annular eclipse (96%) in 1984 in grad school and this was massively better.
     
    Sam Posten likes this.

Share This Page