Software to capture vhs tape and burn to dvd using a PVR 250?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Chris PC, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    What is the best software to use to capture a video tape and burn a dvd? I have some home made video-camera tapes I want to make dvd's of and I have the PVR 250 pci capture card in my PC. Not sure what software would be best for this. Not sure how to make the dvd video look good everywhere.

    thanx in advance for any input,

    [​IMG]

    P.S. Since its video, how can I be sure the 2:2 will look good on digital displays (avoid combing)? Is there a way to record it best, or am I at the mercy of the playback devices 2:2 pulldown?
     
  2. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    Should I use descaler as my capture program?
     
  3. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    If the original source is field-based video, then it's probably not worth trying to do any major tricks. There are plenty of field-based DVDs out there, and lots of strategies for getting them to look good on progressive displays. DVDs are inherently field-based (with specific support for 24fps sources like film), unlike HD-DVD for example.

    To get a good capture, you first need to play the tape well. You need a good VCR, and a Time Base Corrector (built-in or separate). Otherwise, you may get slight waving (most noticeable on vertical lines) which won't compress well and will look even worse.

    You could try using the MPEG-2 capture of the PVR-250. There's no real software choice involved, since it has a hardware MPEG-2 encoder. You'd just set the quality and go. Unless you want to want to squeeze more video on a disc, you'd go with the highest DVD-compliant setting, probably 6 to 8 Mbits/sec.

    Otherwise, there are many choices (too many, actually). You have to choose an analog capture card. At some point, you need to use a comb filter, either the VCR's or the card's; which is better? Nowadays, computers are fast enough to use a lossless video codec, although that will still take up a ton of disc space. You could simplify matters and go with a DV capture device, although you may lose some color resolution (DV is 4:1:1 while DVD is 4:2:0). Then you have to choose an MPEG encoder; a whole 'nother can of worms.
     
  4. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

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    My vcr is a JVC HS 7800 so the comb filter should be ok. I'm capturing from the S-video output. I tried the TBC NR but I don't always like how that looks. I'll see how it works.

    thanx

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ChristopherDAC

    ChristopherDAC Producer

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    If you just want to capture the raw MPEG-II stream from your capture card, to edit in another application, you can do it using a free open-source application VLC. You can open a capture device and stream the data to a file; using "MPEG PS" as the encapsulation method makes MPEG files you can use anywhere.
     

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