Sloppy directv install?

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Charlie Campisi, Aug 12, 2005.

  1. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    I took advantage of the $100 directivo rebate. Got a 708 for free (after rebate) and only a one-year commitment. D* agreed to do the install for free and provide the switch for free. (I already had 4 tuners running off my oval dish, so I needed a switch.) So I am obviously happy with the price, but the job is sloppy. Let me know what you think:

    - the 5x8 multiswitch is just hanging loose beneath the dish, exposed to the elements. Is this ok?

    - the switch is powered (are there unpowered switches?) and the power cable runs off the dish and is concealed behind my deck, but the power pack transformer (a cube about 4"x5"x6") is screwed to the side of my house about a foot off the ground right outside a sliding glass door and then plugged into an outside outlet. It's unsightly and I wonder if it is going to be ok in rain and snow.

    Do I need to have them install a box to house the switch? For the power pack, I was thinking I'd move it inside in my basement storage room and just run the power cable through the wall to the multiswitch. Easy enough for me to do, but I won't bother if there is an unpowered switch I could use instead.

    Right now we have 2 SD directivos and one HD tuner, for 5 tuners total and the oval 3 LNB dish. I will eventually go with an HD tivo and so would like the capability to add at least one more line in the future. What do you think? Thanks
     
  2. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    It doesn't sound like the greatest but I have sympathy for the installer since I did it for a while.
    There were installs I spent 2 days on doing it right and made a total of $50 (minus the gas, coax, connectors etc) I could have made more by sitting at home collecting unemployement.
    And after all that they didn't even tip or say thanks.
    Now to your problem....unless you have a very old reciever, the xcver powers the switches so you don't need the external power. Try unplugging it and see if you loose channels.

    I learned more off this site then the crappy training ( i worked for a reseller not directv or dish.... and I found out they sucked compared to the big 2 in just about every way).
    They have 3 x 8 switches etc but generally the install will provide but they have some good stuff.
    Good Luck and sorry about sticking up somewhat for the installer but I still have nightmares about doing it
    Grant

    http://www.satellitetech.com
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Grant, I commend your work ethic. [​IMG] Too bad most people don’t really appreciate a job well done. [​IMG]

    Yup, you have a problem there. The little doors on those outside outlet covers are only there to protect the outlet when not in use. They are not designed for continual service. That would require so-called “wet service” protection. Typically this entails the outlet being installed in a waterproof box. The box has a flip-up door that’s deep enough to accommodate a cord being plugged into the outlet. The power cable exits the box through a slot at the bottom. Thus any water pressure from the top or sides cannot get to the power source.

    Per Grant’s suggestion, hopefully you’ll be able to lose the powered multiswitch.

    The exposed F connections should have rubber boots over them to protect against the weather. You can get them at Radio Shack, but they have to be installed on the cable before the connector is crimped on.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    I looked up the model switch and it is designed for outdoor use. It is a WNC SWA-48. (It's also a 4x8 switch, not a 5x8 like I thought.) So I guess I am fine with leaving the switch outside. It does not have the rubber protectors over the F connectors. I will move the power adaptor inside. I may try it without the power to see what happens, but I think I can keep it powered and only have to drill one hole in the side of the house and it will either be under the deck, behind a gutter or otherwise out of sight. Thanks for the help.
     
  5. Mike_J_Potter

    Mike_J_Potter Second Unit

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    I would be a little wary or running the cable from inside to the outside of the house, there could be a good chance of someone getting shocked or a fire since the powered wire is exposed to the outside without any protection or a GFI so if if something gets wet your in trouble. I would talk to a electrician and see what code is for powering something like that outdoors. If what he did is infact out of code (most likely is) then call the install company back and see what they can do, espcially if it is out of code. I had problems with my install and just had to run a bunch of coax at my sisters house due to shotty work. Both with the cable company and direct TV so its not any better with either.
     
  6. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    The center or data wire inside the coax is actually offset by 12 volt DC from the Sat Box (also a good reason not to hook up Dishes in the rain)....very early boxes were not; hence the wall warts. That voltage powers the Dishes and switches when needed. A nice solution to the pain of running power up to a roof where very rarely you have an outlet
    They added the offset because of the problems you describe.
    It would be easier to get a replacement box from your provider than deal with electricians etc. if free or cheap.
     
  7. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    Not sure I understand what Grant and Mike are saying. What I am planning on doing is plugging in the adaptor in an outlet in my basement. I would then run the RG6 cable that powers the switch from the adaptor through the wall and to the switch outside.

    Mike, Grant do you see a problem there?
     
  8. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    The switch should not need the adapter if it's a new receiver. Try it without it first
     
  9. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    I did. Lost all the channels. So I definitely need to have it plugged in. I also don't want the "experts" that installed it the first time coming back to fix it. The voltage running through the RG6 is low, right? I have a rubber grommet to run it through the wall, so there shouldn't be any fire risk. Not to mention the wire is insulated.
     
  10. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    Yes, 12 to 18 volts

    From: http://www.satellitetech.com/techhelp.html

    The satellite receiver sends out a DC voltage over the coaxial cable to the LNB at the dish to power the LNB circuitry and to switch between left and right hand circular transponder polarization. The polarity switching is accomplished by changing the DC voltage between 13 and 18 volts. If this voltage signal does not get to the LNB reliably, it will show up as a loss of signal on the odd or even transponders. DBS satellites generally are Ku band, with 32 transponders alternating between left and right hand circular polarization. Each transponder can have several TV channels or a mix of TV, music, or data channels.
     

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