Size matters

Discussion in 'Displays' started by MichaelWalsh, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. MichaelWalsh

    MichaelWalsh Extra

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    Trying to find a 34" direct view 16:9 set that would work in my built-in cabinet. Don't quite know why I'm so hung up on having a 34" set rather than going with a 32" or 30" (the latter of which pretty much any will fit and be cheaper) especially since all I'm replacing is a 12 year old 27", but there you go. My do or die dimensions are:

    43.5 W
    27.0 H (26.75 if the TV comes right to the outside edge)
    23.3 D

    With this in mind, and after a lot of searching, it looks like I'm left with three options IF the dimensions on the various web sites I've looked at can be beleived:

    JVC AV-34WP84
    Sony KV-34HS510 (if I act quickly since it's discontinued)
    Toshiba 34HF84

    I was leaning heavily towards the Toshiba until you guys put me off with your comments on SVM(?). But is this enough of a negative to discount the model if it works on size and other features?

    If not, let me ask a question on the Toshiba....If you set it to use one of the Theaterwide modes to view content (specifically 4:3 in Theaterwide 2), does it remember that setting (perhaps including the scroll position) on power-up, or will it default back to Natural? A HUGE concern I have is that my wife, who is not very technically inclined and also gets home from work some 6 hours earlier than I do, will simply turn it on to watch cable and leave it set way it starts leading to premature burn-in.

    On the JVC....the dimensions I got from the JVC website indicate that the depth is 23.375, a whopping 1/16" deeper than my maximum. This will definitely overhang my cabinet HOWEVER the photos I've seen of this set make the base look like it might not be quite as deep as the picture tube casing. Could anyone verify that to be correct and perhaps even give the depth from the bottom of the base back?
     
  2. Craig

    Craig Second Unit

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    Have you been able to view the Toshiba in a store? If so, did you notice the effects of SVM?

    A lot of people have said that Movie mode on Toshiba sets will either defeat or lessen SVM. If you do notice any effects in the store you might try switching to Movie mode to see if that helps. Movie mode lowers contrast/brightness/sharpness and is a good place to start when you get a new Toshiba and are doing adjustments.

    On my 5 year old Toshiba RPTV, if I leave it in one of the Theaterwide modes it will be in the same mode when I turn it back on. The only exception is if I lose power, it returns to the STD 4:3 mode sometimes.

    I wouldn't necessarily let a single issue like SVM keep me away from a TV if I liked it otherwise. There is no perfect TV, and in my opinion SVM is one of those things that if you don't know about it, you might not notice it.
     
  3. Jeremy Swenson

    Jeremy Swenson Stunt Coordinator

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    arent those the tube type displays? i thought they dont burn in at all?
     
  4. MichaelWalsh

    MichaelWalsh Extra

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    I thought it was only LCD and DLP that don't have a burn in risk.
     
  5. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    They will burn in. Anyone who has seen a GUI burned into a CRT computer monitor (same technology) or a Keno screen burned into a lottery game monitor can tell you that. They are just not as prone to burn in as CRT RPTV's because the direct-view CRT tube is not driven as hard.
     
  6. MichaelWalsh

    MichaelWalsh Extra

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    Bought the JVC and it arrived yesterday. Totally happy with the results so far. Right out of the box with only a bit of tweaking on the picture settings (mostly turning the contrast, brigtness, and color down a tad) it looks great! Panorama mode is fast becoming my favorite way of watching 4:3 content and eliminating my burn in concerns.
     

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