"Simple Incomplete Horizontal Tear of the Posterior Horn of the Meniscus" - ??????

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jason L., May 25, 2003.

  1. Jason L.

    Jason L. Second Unit

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    Calling on the power of the HTF forum.......

    I have been having knee pain for about 18 months.

    I just had an MRI on it, and this is what I got back.

    Does anyone on the HTF have experience with this type of knee problem?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Ashley Seymour

    Ashley Seymour Supporting Actor

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    Sounds like the operation my son had last year. At about 17 he was playing tennis when he went for the ball and felt a pain his his knee. After a few weeks we took him to the doctor who said he had a tear of his meniscus, or what we called in the old days, a cartiledge tear.

    An operation through a slight incision put a plastic staple (I think) through the cartiledge to reattach it to the bone. A lot more involved than I have been able to relate - sorry.

    Cost, about $8,000.
     
  3. Ari

    Ari Stunt Coordinator

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    I've had three similar injuries to yours, except that they were tears of the median meniscus (two of the left knee, one of the right knee).

    The main problem with meniscus tears is that the knee locks or gives way without any warning.

    I had the left knee repaired twice: once via arthroscopy and the other time together with an ACL reconstruction. Rehab wasn't bad...the doctor told me to lose weight and to build my quad mucles to avoid injuring it again...
     
  4. Armando Zamora

    Armando Zamora Second Unit

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    I've had ACL reconstruction to my right knee. Did it while playing softball...play at home plate...ball and baserunner arrived at the plate at the same time...baserunner slid into home plate as I turned to tag him with the ball...his slide clipped my left leg...my right foot didn't give because my cleats got caught in the dirt but instead, my right knee did...badabing, badaboom...blown right knee.

    Eight years and one tough rehab later, I'm still playing softball at full speed, among other activities, as if nothing happened. I run and weight train regularly with no significant ill-effects of the injury. I get the occassional stiffness, but I'd take the stiffness over the alternative which was to stop all weightbearing activities altogether. At the time, I was 30 y.o. and the latter option wasn't an option.

    I'm not going to lie...it was a tough injury (and recovery) to overcome. My orthopedic surgeon had me rehabbing the knee one week after surgery. THAT was painful. I was amazed at how much muscle atrophy I had to my quads in one week's time while wrapped up and immobilized. My right leg looked like a spaghetti strand.

    Ultimately, your decision will rest on your plans for the future. In my situation, I could not see me not running, jumping, picking up my kids (babies at the time) for piggy-back rides, etc..., any time soon. Now, I have young nephews and nieces (a set of triplets, another nephew, and yet another niece or nephew on the way), so I see many more piggy-back rides and rough-housing in the not-so-distant future. Looks like I'm in it for the long-haul and am glad that I worked hard to rehab the knee.

    Good luck Jason. The Red pill will allow you to free your mind of the potential of your knee to buckle under normal circumstances...the Blue pill will keep things as is with you knowing that you could fall-down-and-go-boom without warning. Sorry, your situation may not be as serious as I painted it, but I just had to get the Red pill, Blue pill thing in. [​IMG]
     

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