Shows you think deserved one more season

B-ROLL

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 26, 2016
Messages
2,859
Real Name
Bryan
That website is likely inaccurate. For one, "Gilligan, The Goddess" was produced as the second episode of Season Three but held to air as its last, so it would be highly unusual for that script to contain a list of ideas for Season Four.

Second, I've searched and never found *any* evidence to support the idea that Tina Louise was planning to leave the show at the end of the third season. (Does anyone have proof of someone affiliated with the show saying this?) She tried to get out of her contract during the first year, yes, but she was mollified by CBS and stayed. I've attached some articles from 1967 that give the impression of Louise intending to stick around.

Third, if she was indeed leaving the show, wouldn't common sense suggest that she simply would have been replaced by another actress, not a new character (let alone two)? That would be more logical and likely.
From memory, Russell Johnson wrote in Here on Gilligan's Isle that Tina Louise was constantly complaining about the show, the scripts, the wardrobe and that she was a Broadway actress and and wanted to get off the island.

1600644335504.png


1600644532840.png
 

MatthewA

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2000
Messages
9,221
Location
Salinas, CA
Real Name
Matthew
Absolutely! I love the remake. It was fantastic and it did indeed get many, many things right. It was just getting warmed up and the plug got pulled. Sad.
That was the last year Brandon Tartikoff programmed NBC, and it seemed like he was in a mood for fantasy; that season had a Stephen J. Cannell/Disney collaboration called The 100 Lives of Black Jack Savage that never made it past its first season. 60 Minutes Syndrome struck again; that was the main competition. But The Disney Channel did not continue the format. The ratings didn't justify the costs, unfortunately.
 

bmasters9

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
4,416
Real Name
Ben Masters
60 Minutes Syndrome struck again; that was the main competition.
And that killed two shows that were on in '82 on Sundays at 7: a short-lived magazine-type show on ABC w/the late Dick Clark (Apr. '82, IIRC) called Inside America...


...and one that was on in the 1982-83 season on NBC called Voyagers!, w/Meeno Peluce and the late Jon-Erik Hexum (three years before the latter met an untimely end w/what he thought was an unloaded prop gun, IIRC)...

 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

MatthewA

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2000
Messages
9,221
Location
Salinas, CA
Real Name
Matthew
I actually have mixed feelings about this exercise because I actually have gotten a show I wanted back — Futurama — and the results, for the most part, weren't as good. At least they gave closure to the character arcs that made it such a great show to begin with.

As for ALF, you get what you get when you hire the director of Smokey and the Bandit III (née Smokey is the Bandit). In addition to the glib non-explanation about the Tanner family's whearabouts, they ignored not any other Melmacians besides Gordon Shumway, but the Ochmoneks when Raquel had discovered him and Jake was in the Tanners' house with him repededly. But you can't say this pseudo-resolution killed Martin Sheen's career after his turn as the antithesis of Josiah Bartlett before there was one. That casting coup kind of made sense on paper. Max Wright was in All that Jazz, a 1979 Best Picture Oscar nominee, competing with Apocalypse Now which Martin Sheen was in.

...and one that was on in the 1982-83 season on NBC called Voyagers!, w/Meeno Peluce and the late Jon-Erik Hexum (three years before the latter met an untimely end w/what he thought was an unloaded prop gun, IIRC)...

His sister, Soleil Moon Frye, lasted twice as long in that time slot as Punky Brewster (soon to return on Peacock for a de facto 5th season) but had to deal with the double whammy of Disney Sunday Movie coming back to ABC in early 1986, dividing the younger-skewering demographic they counted on. First-run syndication came to its rescue to double the episode count while Voyagers! got just the one season. To show there were no hard feelings, Disney cast her in a TV movie with Paul Reiser called You Ruined My Life.

The show before it, Silver Spoons, also met the same fate*. Peluce was a guest star there on a Very Special Episode about a boy on the receiving end of physical abuse from his father, complete with a big shiner courtesy of the make-up department. Ouch, in more ways than one! It reunited him with Joel Higgins when they had co-starred on Best of The West on ABC in the 1981-1982 season, after which ABC shed itself of practically every non-Garry Marshall Paramount sitcom. They canceled Taxi and Police Squad, too. Spoons' first season was up against the Disney Anthology's last consecutive year of its original run; the company decided to end it and focus almost all TV resources on starting The Disney Channel. Disney's change in management and ramping up the output of new content didn't make a difference in the ratings. Nor does Disney buying ABC seem to have made its third iteration a ratings hit on a level it was when Walt Disney was alive.

NBC got a third actor from Best of the West for one of their Nine Bombs Canceled in 1983: the late Leonard Frey. He co-starred in Mr. Smith, a sitcom about a superintelligent orangutan. This from the network that turned down Small Wonder, which (coincidence or not) had an antagonist named Brandon.

Hexum's replacement on Cover-Up (a Fox show and thus Disney-by-Proxy) was Anthony Hamilton, a former ballet dancer from Australia. Like Frey and Spoons' Franklyn Seales, he also died of AIDS in 1995.

*Hmm, let's see, give them one more year, outlive the existence of Embassy Communications, and let Ricky graduate from high school and decide what to do from there, or stay put having avoided making some of the same mistakes other shows from Tandem/TAT/Embassy made once they had been on longer than that. Worst-case scenario, it enables the existence of another Cousin Stephanie … or worse … another Sam McKinney!
 
Last edited:

Gary OS

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
5,231
Location
Florida
Real Name
Gary
1. Ozzie & Harriet. They were really just hitting their stride during that 14th season.
2. Lassie. So many more storylines yet to be explored. 19 seasons just wasn't enough.
3. Gunsmoke. Miss Kitty was finally starting shedding some of her baby fat and really becoming a looker.
4. My Three Sons. How could they just end the show without giving us an Ernie wedding?

Ok. Obviously I'm kidding with all those picks. I love each of those shows, by the way. But even I can say they had run their course. But here are a couple I really would have liked to see at least one more season of:

Leave it to Beaver. I know I'll be alone on this one, but I so enjoyed the tantum of Wally, Eddie and Lumpy that another year, with them now in a college close by while they were still living at home, would have been fun.

Petticoat Junction. Now I'm actually being serious about a show getting it's second wind. I honestly thought that 7th season they had found their stride after Bea's death and were enjoying themselves. I would have liked to see that 8th season CBS had originally planned for the show.

The Munsters. I thought they had one more season in them. The chemistry between Gwynne & Lewis was excellent.


Gary "those are the three that jump right to mind" O.
 

Lecagr

Supporting Actor
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Messages
547
Real Name
Lee
Mannix was still a strong show in it's 8th season, it deserved to have a 9th season in 1975-76 but CBS cancelled Mannix and greenlighted Bronk instead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

jayembee

Supporting Actor
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
705
Real Name
Jerry
Thought of another: Boomtown (2002-2003), a crime drama with Donnie Wahlberg, Mykelti Williamson, and Neal McDonough. First season ran 18 episodes. It was renewed for a second season, but that only ran another six episodes. It was annoying that while there was a Season 1 DVD set, they never released a S2 set, or a Complete Series set.

Two other shows from around the same time that I would've liked to see more of were:

Karen Sisco, with Carla Gugino as the title character, from Elmore Leonard's Out of Sight. It co-starred Robert Forster as her father.

Keen Eddie. Tonque-in-cheek fish out of water series, with Mark Valley starred as an American detective who ends up working with the police in London. Never went past the initial 13-episode order from FOX.
 
Last edited:

Walter Kittel

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 28, 1998
Messages
7,406
Boomtown was a pretty enjoyable procedural. Particularly liked Mykelti Williamson in this series. "We're the police, we can lie all we want." or something to that effect. :)

I think it has already been mentioned in this thread, but I was really disappointed when CBS canceled Limitless after only one season. I really enjoyed this series and the visuals it used to illustrate Brian's enhanced thought processes.

- Walter.
 

bmasters9

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
4,416
Real Name
Ben Masters
Thought of another: Boomtown (2002-2003), a crime drama with Donnie Wahlberg, Mykelti Williamson, and Neal McDonough. First season ran 18 episodes. It was renewed for a second season, but that only ran another six episodes. It was annoying that while there was a Season 1 DVD set, they never released a S2 set, or a Complete Series set.
I thought for sure they'd put out an all-in-one, especially since that series only ran 24 episodes combined.
 

jcroy

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2011
Messages
6,192
Real Name
jr
It would have been great if Caprica had continued, and went into details about how the Cylons became "self aware". A short segment at end of the first season suggested what might have been.
 

Al.Anderson

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Messages
2,657
Real Name
Al
I forgot one - Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (2016).
I can't believe they canceled the show after just two seasons; outstanding cast, awesome plot lines.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

jayembee

Supporting Actor
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
705
Real Name
Jerry
I forgot one - Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (2016).
I can't believe they canceled the show after just two seasons; outstanding cast, awesome plot lines.
The Fiona Dourif (daughter of Brad) character, Bart, is one of my GOAT TV characters. My wife and I still paraphrase her line, "There are two Kens?!?!?!" on occasion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

timk1041

Supporting Actor
Joined
May 9, 2014
Messages
548
Real Name
Timothy
Lost In Space. I would have liked to see The Robinsons finally make it to Alpha Centauri and then maybe back to Earth.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

darkrock17

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
1,800
Location
Alexandria, VA
Real Name
Andrew McClure
Lost In Space. I would have liked to see The Robinsons finally make it to Alpha Centauri and then maybe back to Earth.
Lost In Space had at least one more season left in it. if it was cancelled after 4 seasons that would have been alright as it would have over 100+ episodes which would be good for syndication.
 

jayembee

Supporting Actor
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
705
Real Name
Jerry
Lost In Space had at least one more season left in it. if it was cancelled after 4 seasons that would have been alright as it would have over 100+ episodes which would be good for syndication.
Back in the day, series needed only 65 episodes to be syndication-ready. With 65 episodes, a show that was stripped for syndication (run five days a week) would have enough episodes for 13 weeks (one quarter-year).
 

darkrock17

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
1,800
Location
Alexandria, VA
Real Name
Andrew McClure
Back in the day, series needed only 65 episodes to be syndication-ready. With 65 episodes, a show that was stripped for syndication (run five days a week) would have enough episodes for 13 weeks (one quarter-year).
Really? I thought it was at least 100, because back in the 50's and 60's by the time a show reached the end of it's third season it would already have or be close to having 100 episodes. Needing 65 is what cartoons needed back in 80's and 90's.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

jayembee

Supporting Actor
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
705
Real Name
Jerry
Yup. Even more (relatively) recently, when the typical season dropped to 22 episodes, it meant a series was syndication-ready after three seasons. By well into the 90s, it was bumped up to 88 episodes (4 seasons). By the early Aughties, it was up to 100.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

darkrock17

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 13, 2007
Messages
1,800
Location
Alexandria, VA
Real Name
Andrew McClure
Yup. Even more (relatively) recently, when the typical season dropped to 22 episodes, it meant a series was syndication-ready after three seasons. By well into the 90s, it was bumped up to 88 episodes (4 seasons). By the early Aughties, it was up to 100.
Now shows can be syndicated after just 2 seasons, as that's what CBS/Paramount is doing with NCIS: New Orleans.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby67

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
345,544
Messages
4,745,255
Members
141,477
Latest member
Gil Jones