should I use these to organize my cables?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ethan_l, Dec 30, 2002.

  1. ethan_l

    ethan_l Stunt Coordinator

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    http://www.microcenter.com/single_pr...uct_id=0025438
    I have all 3 next gen consoles and a prog. DVD player
    so I've got a lot of cables running to my HDTV
    and it looks like a huge mess of wiring
    so I was wondering if I should use these to organize them
    most of the cables I use are monster brand and shielded
    cept for GCN
    thanks
     
  2. Ronn.W

    Ronn.W Second Unit

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    I've thought about getting something like that as well. I think anyone with a HT setup is going to have more cables than they can shake a fist at. In the end I went with plastic ties to keep them all together. I've got too many going in different directions between sources to make this a good idea for me.
     
  3. Marc_E

    Marc_E Supporting Actor

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    You can buy a tube like that cheaper at homedepot I am sure. The one problem with an inclosed tube that I have noticed is if you ever need to swap out a cable it is a MAJOR pain in the ass.
    I bought some black copper pipe insulator (black foam tube),split it open and stabled it to the back of my rack. I ran all the cables down it and tied them together. Cables are fairly neat and can't be seen from the front. Cheap and pretty.
    Marc
     
  4. RobertCharlotte

    RobertCharlotte Supporting Actor

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    All of those wire looms (like the one shown in the link) that I have seen, Marc, are split along their length. In fact, if you go to Radio Shack and ask for "split loom," this is what you'll get.
     
  5. TimTurtino

    TimTurtino Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah, Home Depot has this stuff-- I think it's like $5 for 25 feet or something. It is a pain in the butt to work with, though. Make sure your setup is darn near finalized before you start using it.

    Me
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    A few other wire-management suggestions to make your life easier:

    - You are going to make 3 different bundles of wires that are separated from each other: power cords, speaker wires, intereconnects.

    - Make sure your receiver/amp is on the bottom shelf of your rack. This allows the speaker wires to flow out without covering any other equipment or interconnects.

    - Get some wire labels like the ones from Radio Shack that have clear-plastic tape that wraps around to protect the writing. At each end of every cable, put a letter like A/B/C... This includes the power cords! You can start with "A" for the power cords, the re-start the lettering at "A" for the interconnects. (They are obviously different).

    (After putting my power cords in split-loom tubing without labels, a Sat receiver had problems. Tech Support advised me to un-plug the unit. It took me 8 minutes to figure out which cord belonged to the Sat receiver.)

    - Look at the back of your rack, decide which side has more power cords and pull all the power cords to this side. You can locate/mount a good power strip to this side of your rack. Use split-loom tubing to wrap the wires and this plus the stiffness of the wires will help hold all the power cords to the side.

    - Take all your interconnects in a loose bundle down the middle of your rack. Cut a length of tubing a bit shorter than the distance from the top of your equipment to the bottom. Wrap your interconnects loosely with the tubing. This allows the various wires to enter/exit where they will. When you are done, it will still be a bit of a mess with the cables like a root-system, but they will be bundled towards the middle of your rack and look neater.

    Other things:

    - Never use nylon zip-ties for your interconnects. They will 'eat' their way into the insulation over time. Never use the twist-ties from the bread wrappers. You are after loose bundles, not tight.

    - You can use velcro strips (Case Logic sells some special ones), or even just a few inches of velcro from the fabric store.

    - All your interconnects made with coax cable are shielded. If they are round and as thick/thicker than your CATV coax they are made with coax cable.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I used that spiral cut tubing from Radio Shack (http://www.radioshack.com/product.as...Fid=278%2D1638). It's made for smaller groups of wire/cabling and is probably even more of a pain to work with than the tubing.. but I think it looks nicer than the "vacuum hose" look of the tubing.
     
  8. Chris Strnad

    Chris Strnad Auditioning

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    Another solution are the velcro version of the plastic zip-ties. Not quite concealing as the tubes, I know, but great in their simplicity...

    I have a bunch of them, and they've worked wonders in keeping the rat's nest behind my computers at bay. The size I have also sport a small perforation to allow you to secure the strap to something with a screw/nail/etc.
     
  9. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    Real Name:
    CJ
     
  10. Andrew Walbert

    Andrew Walbert Stunt Coordinator

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    Another option for anybody buying new equipment to consider is IEEE-1394, as it should quite hopefully cut cable clutter down substantially. Not counting power: one cable for the DVD player, one for the CD player, one for the SAT receiver, two for the TV (in/out), and one for each speaker. So you'd only have 10-20 cables, as opposed to 30-40. Doesn't help much if you're using current equipment, as few have FireWire interconnect capabilities, but in a year or so, everything should be 1394 ready.
     
  11. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  12. RobertCharlotte

    RobertCharlotte Supporting Actor

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  13. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    bob, i think you misinterpreted my post. when i say 'dont put the amp on the bottom', i mean, dont put it on the bottom with all the other stuff on top. i think our equipment racks may differ as well, having my amp on top doesnt mean no heat flow, its actually closer for the fan i installed to move air from it. as you can imagine, i put the fan in there specifically for that. it doesnt move a lot of air, but its not really supposed to, i just want it to move it, even if its slowly.

    CJ
     
  14. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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