Should I Stay with the Company?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Marc Angeles, Jul 26, 2003.

  1. Marc Angeles

    Marc Angeles Stunt Coordinator

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    Here is the problem. My company is moving and I can't decide whether I should stay or go. They will be moving about an hour out of the city (Cambridge, MA)to a location west of Metro Boston (Milford, MA). Right now it takes me about 15 minutes to get to work. With this move, it will take at least an hour, probably more, and there are some tolls involved. I say, with the extra gas needed and tolls, it will be an extra 50.00/week, plus the 2-3 hours spent on the road and the extra mileage put on my car. I can easily find another job in the city with the same salary. Any comments?

    Thanks,
    Marc
     
  2. Nathan*W

    Nathan*W Screenwriter

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    Maybe telecomuting is an option?
     
  3. Tim Markley

    Tim Markley Screenwriter

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    Find another job first and then quit. I don't know what the job situation is in your area but it sucks pretty much all over the country. A few years ago I wouldn't have thought twice about quitting a job without another one lined up. Now, there's no way I'd do it.
     
  4. Marc Angeles

    Marc Angeles Stunt Coordinator

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    I'd hate to sound stupid, but what is telecomuting? [​IMG] That is what I plan to do. I can't imagine not having something lined up before I quit. Because of what I do, I can pretty much get up and leave and find another position in any state in the country. There is a massive shortage of cytogeneticist in the US and someone would gladly take me in. So why am I undecided? I actually like the job and the people that I work with plus my boss is the nicest guy you will ever meet.
     
  5. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    Telecomuting would be working from home.

    I guess you could consider moving too, or failing that, ask if they will compensate you for the extra expenses. You have to judge whether the travel time is worth it, and how it will be in the winter.

    If there is ready work locally, that may be your best bet. Long commutes get tiring quickly, especially in bad weather.
     
  6. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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    Marc,

    I'm not familiar with Milford, but it looks like it is right off of 495.

    I live in Boston (the city) and I work in Waltham. My commute is about 15 miles on the Pike and 5 miles on 128. It takes me about 30 minutes to get to work and about 45 to get home... not too bad. The worst aspect is having to pay $3.00 in tolls every month.

    I have a friend who commutes to Framingham (he also lives in the city) and it take him about 45 minutes in the morning and an hour at night. I think he pays $5.00 in tolls every day.

    Right now my company is preparing to perform massive layoffs. If I survive the layoffs, there is a good chance that I will get to work in downtown Boston (across from South Station) in a different office of ours... which means I'll have about a 5 minune commute to work every day [​IMG] Wish me luck!
     
  7. Marc Angeles

    Marc Angeles Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah, I will paying atleast 5.00 a day in tolls alone and I will be filling my tank at least twice a week. Thats about 70.00/week just to get to work and back. If your friends commute is 45 minutes to Framingham, I am pretty sure that my commute will be close to 1.5 hours to and from work. That is 3 hours on the road. Right now, I fill up only once every 2 weeks and I could easily take the T if I chose to. I hope that they offer some kind of incentive to stay, because right now, it looks like I will be updating my resume.
     
  8. Tom Meyer

    Tom Meyer Second Unit

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    Like someone else said, for God's sake, don't quit before you get a new job. Who knows, maybe the commute won't be *that* bad and having a job you like would probably be worth a few extra bucks + time a week.

    Re: telecommuting ... from what google turned up about "cytogenetics", unless your work can be done entirely from a computer, sounds like that isn't an option unless your company wants to build you a lab at home !

    Are there commuter trains that run out there ? you'd be stuck on a schedule but it's a lot easier than driving and you can always nap on the train.
     
  9. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

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    Best thing to do is try the commute on a day off. Try driving both ways at the times you'd be commuting and then see what you think.

    The other thing is job security. If you leave your job now how many others are waiting within an easy distance? What's to say you won't have a similar commute at another job? Would you consider moving out of the area or the state entirely? Could you move closer to the job?

    Evaluate this with your family (should you have one) and then see what your options are. It may be this isn't so bad or it may be impossible. Only when you've tried it will you know if it's tolerable to you and your family.

    No matter what I agree completely with everyone else. Do NOT quit unless you have another job lined-up. First, having a current job will make you worth more to an employer because they will have to lure you away from a job that, frankly, you're happy with except for this one thing. Second, if you're unemployed employers will frequently offer you less money knowing you're more likely to jump at their offer all other things being equal.

    Approach your employer and ask them about an increase in compensation to make-up for the additional costs. Factor in gas, tolls, milage, increased insurance, and the wear it will cause your car. Also factor in an amount as an incentive to keep you. Their response will tell you how badly they want to keep you and, by extenstion, how attractive going somwhere else will be.

    Being at a job you like with people you like working with AND a great boss is a blessing you can't just toss away. Many, many people would gladly trade places with you.

    Think about this very seriously before you leap.
     
  10. Bob Graz

    Bob Graz Supporting Actor

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    Since you seem to be somewhat undecided, it sounds like you like your current postion and company, except for the possible new commute. Have they offered to compensate you for the extra cost due to their relocation? Have you asked about that? In any event, there's not need to set a deadline to act before the move. You could make the commute, see how things go and if other positions are that plentiful make the move to another company later if you decide the commute is not for you.
     
  11. Bob Graz

    Bob Graz Supporting Actor

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    double post
     
  12. Alex S

    Alex S Second Unit

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    Marc,

    I wouldn't move for any job, but that's just me.
    It doesn't sound that far away that you'd have to move anyway.

    I don't know what you do but the job market is terrible right now. I agree with the others, don't quit until you find something else.

    Why not try it for a little while and if you don't like the commute then look for another job.
     
  13. Gary->dee

    Gary->dee Screenwriter

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    I don't know about your housing situation, Marc but if I were in your position I'd start looking to relocate to Sudbury. Might not be the best decision for you but I love Sudbury so any excuse to move there or nearby like Concord or Lexington would be welcomed.
     
  14. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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    Lexington isn't really anywhere near Milford - he'd have to take 128 south (parking lot), then the Mass Pike east (which should be OK).

    My advice, and I'm sure the advice of anyone who has ever lived, worked, or commuted in this area, is to avoid 128 if at all possible. It has gotten somewhat lighter (the traffic) because of all the lost tech jobs (128 belt iswas the San Jose of the East Coast) the traffic is still very heavy most of the times (this morning, took me 25 minutes to travel 3 miles on 128).
     
  15. Marc Angeles

    Marc Angeles Stunt Coordinator

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    I will be moving to Arlington in about a month which means that I could catch the Mass pike from say Boston (5.00 in tolls a day), 128 south to Mass pike (some tolls and major traffic), or rt 2 to 495 south (major miles on the car). Either way, the commute is going to suck. The best thing to do from what everyone has contributed is to try the commute for a month or two, but at the same time look for another position closer to the city. I am also up for my yearly review/raise at the same time as the move so let's see what happens then. Thanks for all of the replys and I when the time comes, I will keep you up to date.

    Marc
     
  16. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    IMO, an enjoyable job & workplace with a decent manager is worth some minor inconveniences. You also have the option of moving your home (now is a good time to buy).
     

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