Should I go see Rush tonight?

Discussion in 'Music' started by Chad Isaacs, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. Chad Isaacs

    Chad Isaacs Supporting Actor

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    I have always like Rush's music though I have never been a big fan.My wife and I get a kids free date night and I just noticed they are playing tonight and tickets prices are not too bad,well,they are horrible by comparison to what they used to be but I digress....should we go?
     
  2. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    Just sit at home and listen to their albums. Rush is one of those bands where hearing them live is exactly like hearing their albums. I have even read interviews where they say this is their goal. If this is their goal, then why bother to go see them live??

    Note, this is from hearing Rush from 15-20 years ago. They may have changed by now (and not necessarily for the better:b ).
     
  3. Kevin Crowl

    Kevin Crowl Stunt Coordinator

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    Yes go see them. One great show! I picked up 2 tickets for $20.00 on Ebay as well as 2 Ozzfest tickets for the same price.
     
  4. CalvinCarr

    CalvinCarr Supporting Actor

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    I would say leave it up to your wife. She is probably the one who needs the kids free night the most. Take care of her and she will take care of you...[​IMG] I do have to say as a huge Rush fan that I don't think thier live stuff is all that great. Just listen to one of thier live C.D.'s and decide.
     
  5. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    Are you kidding, dude?

    I've seen Rush twice and it was freakin' awesome. Of course, that will only be true if you really like their music. I'm a huge fan, so take that for what it's worse. But there is a vibrancy to the music life that you won't get from staying at home and listening to the albums.

    Some bands' music is so tightly constructed that playing it "exact" is the only way to do the material justice, and that is very true for Rush. Still, they do medleys and, on this tour, a few covers. Plus, this will probably the last time they tour in a very long time (or even ever).

    The reviews on this tour have been great.

    Of course, Calvin is right, check with the wife. But musically, and as a Rush fan, this tour is a must.

    I will be seeing them in August.
     
  6. Zen Butler

    Zen Butler Producer

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    No, whatever you do, don't go. I had a vision. Celine Dion is going to make a guest appearance on Red Barchetta.
     
  7. Michael Pineo

    Michael Pineo Stunt Coordinator

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    I personally feel that Rush is a band that can't be truly appreciated until you see them live. There is so much power that comes through their music live that doesn't get captured when recorded. I actually got chills when I heard them do 'Resist' live (the original version, not the acoustic one they did on the last tour, although I enjoyed that one as well).

    MikeP
     
  8. TheLongshot

    TheLongshot Producer

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    While they tend to play their music similar to the way they do on the album, it is not "exactly like hearing their albums". The live experience is something else.

    Just go.

    Jason
     
  9. John_Bonner

    John_Bonner Supporting Actor

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    Seeing Neil's solo in person is alone worth the price of admission.
     
  10. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    WARNING: The following is only an opinion:

    If FREAKS & GEEKS taught me anything, it's that Neal Peart's drumming stinks. If you want to hear some phenomenal drumming, look no further.
     
  11. Michael Pineo

    Michael Pineo Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't understand statements like this. I can understand not liking Neal Peart's style, but to say he stinks is just plain wrong. He is a very accomplished drummer. The way he plays may not appeal to everyone, but his ability can't be questioned.

    I know the above was stated as an opinion, but to me there is a big difference between saying that you don't like someone's playing style and saying that someone 'stinks'. I guess saying someone 'stinks' is technically an opinion, but it implies that he is a bad player. I don't see how anyone can say that. You might find him over the top, or bombastic (I think that was the term someone used in another thread), but he can obviously play.

    And no, I am not a Neal Peart disciple (I don't play the drums). But, as a guitarist, it has always been a pet peeve of mine when people make sweeping statements like that about musicians. Especially when there is no reason given. I mean, I've never liked Jimmy Page's guitar playing. It's just not my cup of tea. But that certainly doesn't mean he stinks.


    Sorry about that. Just one of my personal pet peeves. Nothing to see here. Move along, move along...

    MikeP
     
  12. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    Mike,

    Well first of all, "stinks" was the exact word used by Lindsey Weir's dad in the F&G episode, and I was expecting someone to notice the reference.

    Secondly, I think that "technical prowess - the good taste to know what to play and what not to play = poor musicianship". I realize that taste is very subjective.

    Thirly, maybe some of the more knowledgable jazz buffs can explain this more fully (I am still a mere puppy when it comes to appreciating jazz) but don't the two drummers featured on the Drum Battle CD exhibit far more sophisticated and refined techniques than Mr. Peart?

    Fourthly, (is that even a word?) the original poster isn't a huge Rush fan, so I figured he wouldn't be offended by my comment. Since this is an open-ended question, and not a Rush appreciation thread, I stand by my comment.


    Chad,

    Take your wife out to her favorite restaurant. Buy a nice bottle of wine. With the price of concert tickets today, you'll still have enough left over for that Drum Battle CD. That's my advice. [​IMG]
     
  13. Michael Pineo

    Michael Pineo Stunt Coordinator

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    Sorry Rob. I only saw a couple of episodes of Freaks and Geeks so I didn't get the reference :b. My comments weren't necessarily directed at you, just a little of my frustration coming out from reading so many comments like that around here.

    I don't know if I necessarily agree that Buddy Rich and Gene Krupa "exhibit far more sophisticated and refined techniques than Mr. Peart". IIRC, Neal has cited Buddy Rich as a pretty big influence on him. And considering his work ethic when it comes to drumming, I imagine Neal has put in a lot of work refining those techniques himself. Plus, Rush plays rock music. It's kind of an apples/oranges thing, like comparing Yngwie Malmsteen to B.B. King. Then again, I'm not a drummer, so what the hell do I know [​IMG]

    Anyway, no offense intended. What was this thread about again? [​IMG] Oh yeah, just go see them. Even if to only hear Alex's rant during the beginning of La Villa Strangiato [​IMG]

    MikeP
     
  14. Ron Etaylor

    Ron Etaylor Second Unit

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    I was never a big fan until I saw them live circa 1986. They were so good the two times I have seen them I count among some of the best shows I've seen. Unless your wife is a hater, definetly go.
     
  15. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    Why go see Rush when you can listen to him eery weekday on the radio?
     
  16. James Buhler

    James Buhler Stunt Coordinator

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    y'know.........if i didn't know better.........I would think that this was a troll. [​IMG] Wait! ...........it is a troll!!!
    This thread has nothing to do with Mr. Peart's chops. The original poster asked if he should go see Rush, not if he should go see the Neil Peart show.
     
  17. Gary_W

    Gary_W Auditioning

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    Every poster that said to stay at home, never went themselves. Hope you went, if you did, I'm sure you're glad you did. 30th Aniverasary concert, pulling out all the stops, if you even kind of liked one of the songs they did it should make this a no-brainer. Hope you didn't miss out.
     
  18. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    At the risk of appearing egotistic, I consider myself qualified, as evidenced by the dozen or so page "HTF jazz club" thread that I started and had going on for a while and currently in the "Reviews by Me" thread. I listen to jazz as much if not more than rock these days, go to live shows all the time and have seen and heard my fair share of drummers, good and bad, rock and jazz. Also, in the "club" thread, one of my original recommendations was an Art Blakey album, a drummer who's technique, taste, skill, and influence are undeniable.

    And I'm a Rush fan.

    As one post above said, the comparison between Peart and Krupa or Rich is moot. They play completely different styles. No, Peart couldn't play big band swing. But guess what- Buddy Rich couldn't play for an arena rock band, either.

    In terms of pure technical ability and skill, any good jazz drummer is superior to even the best rock drummers. So Rich and Krupa are, in that sense, "better" than Bonzo, Moon, Baker, et al. In fact, any really good jazz musician is probably more skilled than any rock musician (with a few exceptions, of course). In this sense, even Jimi Hendrix couldn't compare with a John McLaughlin or Wes Montgomery.

    So does that mean we're not supposed to listen to rock music? Hardly.

    The charge that Peart doesn't hold out (doesn't "know when to play and when not to play" is as valid as the claim that Rush as a whole solos all the time- both are simply not true and are quickly dispelled with even the quickest listen.

    Frankly, I think Keith Moon could have benefitted from a bit of restraint sometimes, but then his bombastic style was part of the Who's charm. But try saying something negative about the Who and you're tarred and feathered.

    Peart's uniqueness lies in his perfect timing. While this is anethema to the traditional quality of "swinging," Rush is not a band that swings. This precision- and yes, good taste, which Peart exhibits consistently- is the driving force behind Rush's sound. Maybe that's why people hate Peart's playing- because it's so specifically "Rush," and the only musical entity guarenteed to create more ire from music listeners than Rush (and draw negative posts in a thread) is hip-hop.

    Personally, I very much dislike drum solos in rock music because, quite frankly, they're usually done just to spotlight the guy but he has nothing to say musically. Peart's solos are almost an exception to me. I don't think they're that great musically, but they're entertaining at least, while others bore me. Some jazz drummers solo well, and that I love to see (and some don't- last weekend I was at an excellent Jackie McLean set where the drummer was good but his solo was just a firy display of technicality and dreadfully stupid). I could live without Peart's solos, but I expect them at the concert and don't mind them.

    It's understandable why rock drummers get into Peart- his discipline and precisions are unusual in rock, which usually emphasises power and noise. However, if a drummer is really interested in expanding his palate, he'll have to get into other things.

    I love Rich and Krupa, but frankly am not that interested in "drum battles"- I'd hear it, but not buy it. Isn't that more self-indulgent as a drummer than anything Peart did?
     
  19. TheLongshot

    TheLongshot Producer

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    Which is why I have some respect for Peart for trying the jazz thing. While he probably won't be a great jazz drummer, at least he's trying to expand his knowledge.

    Jason
     
  20. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    Thanks, Mike, for your comments.


    I should clarify what I meant by that. Since rock or pop musicians are generally pretty low on the totem pole as far as pure musicianship goes, a rock musician doesn't impress me by having slightly more skill than another rock musician. A rock musician is great, in my opinion, for making interesting choices. Though Ringo Starr isn't as skilled as Neal Peart, I find his choices (for example, his use of the toms on HOLD ON JOHN from the Plastic Ono Band album, or the fill in the last chorus of TICKET TO RIDE) to be far more interesting than any choice Neal Peart has ever made. Likewise Stewart Copland's unique use of the hi-hats on the first 3 Police albums.

    To put another way, if the material doesn't interest me, it doesn't matter (to me) how much skill the rock musician exhibits while playing it.

    To make an analogy, if a skilled director only makes movies with terrible scripts, I have no problem saying the director's work "stinks", in a casual context such as an After Hours thread by a non-fan about recommendations for an evening's plans with the wife. In a serious discussion, I would use more articulate and diplomatic language.

    I didn't mean to offend anybody by my comments. If only one person who reads this thread checks out FREAKS & GEEKS, then my job is done. [​IMG] I don't expect anyone to agree with everything said on the show, which would be quite impossible anyway, given the diversity of opinions expressed by its large cast of colorful characters.

    Anyway, all this is off-topic. I want to know what Chad and his wife did, and how they enjoyed their child-free evening. [​IMG]
     

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