Should I even bother with LCD rear projection

Discussion in 'Displays' started by DanielKellmii, Aug 4, 2004.

  1. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

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    I am pretty sure that I am going to get a crt rear projection TV. I was just looking for some opinions. From what I can see, the biggest disadvantage of a crt rear projection is that it is big and heavy. Well, I have a 16 foot deep living room that alread has about 20 inches taken up by an existing tube TV and an entertainment center. That leaves me with a working space of 14 feet 4 inches. Plenty of room for my family. I also plan on building in the RPTV and have shelves on the side for my HT gear.
    Is there really a point for me to look at thinner TVs?
    Other than the wow factor, I can't think of any.
     
  2. Ray Tsui

    Ray Tsui Stunt Coordinator

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    The only thing about CRT's is that uneven burn-in can be an issue if you watch a lot of 4:3 material. DLP's and LCD's don't have that problem.

    Personally I don't like the look of a huge entertainment shelving unit, getting a thin TV frees one up from the "humungous home entertainment center" look.

    But for the most part you are right, there isn't that much advantage for buying LCD for you. If you plan on taking advantage of digital output devices like computers, HDTV terminals, a native 720P LCD or DLP rear projector screen can look very nice with perfect 1:1 pixel mapping
     
  3. John S

    John S Producer

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    Well, while it is dinosaur technology, and really not in favor much anymore. CRT RPTV still has about as many advantages as disadvantages. Quality units, still deliver amazing picture quality for the buck. I'd say for most consumers it probably still makes the most sense. I have a 60" and man is it a Titanic. Barely fits in my current situaution. One thing I really like about them, is you can sit very close to them, and still have great picture quality, no rainbows, no screen door, no pixelation, ect..ect...
     
  4. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    CRT sets need a lot of TLC to look their best. A Sony LCD RP unit will almost always look better out of the box compared to a CRT rptv.

    Once you tweak the CRT unit, it's potential really shines through.

    both technologies have strengths and weaknesses ...

    Regards
     
  5. Jeff W.

    Jeff W. Stunt Coordinator

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    Flat panel tech isn't yet ready for prime time.

    When they fix the viewing angle problems, the rainbow problems, the blur/lag problems, get the resolution up to 1080 ... AND ... make a decent sized set (50"+) not cost as much as a new Toyota... THEN you can think about it.

    Til then, CRT is still king.
     
  6. DanielKellmii

    DanielKellmii Supporting Actor

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    Michael, I fully intend to get the set professionally calibrated. I was leaning toward that anyways, but then I went to a friends house and his set is professionally done. Wow, somebody out there really knows what he is doing. I figure it is money well spent. His set, a 57 inch Toshiba, looked great.

    Ray, I kow what you mean, that is why I am going to custom make something for my house. Not sure exactly what it will be, but it will look built into the wall. I have to choose the TV first to get the dimensions. I plan on making a tight fit. (Yes, I will leave adequate room for cooling in the back and the sides.)
     
  7. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    Stretch modes make that a moot point especially if they are good like the ones in my Mits.
     
  8. Ray Tsui

    Ray Tsui Stunt Coordinator

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    Stretch modes [​IMG]
     
  9. Kenneth Harden

    Kenneth Harden Screenwriter

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    Someone do the math. If you have a 60" 16:9 TV and watch a 4:3 program, how much picture area will you have? 45" or so?
     
  10. Andy Kim

    Andy Kim Second Unit

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    I went browsing for a TV today and while I was leaning towards a Sony LCD Rear Projection TV, I have to admit the picture doesn't even compare to the CRTs in my opinion.
    But they are massive and I can't find one larger than 40" so I'm forced to look at LCD Rear or DLP Rear.
     
  11. Jason Charlton

    Jason Charlton Ambassador

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    In the early days of 16:9 displays, stretch modes were pretty bad and understandably, they turned a lot of people off. The same isn't true today. Stretch modes are not evil! Most sets have excellent modes that offer an excellent compromise. After a week or two, it doesn't even seem like a compromise anymore. I have a Sony CRT RPTV and watch virtually 100% of 4:3 programming in the Wide Zoom mode.

    I would much rather spend a little time adjusting to a stretch mode than have to live with a picture that has lackluster shadow detail and gray blacks.

    -Jason
     
  12. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    I find that hard to believe.
     
  13. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    As stated above, you need to look at CRT RPTV's. Best picture and lowest price for the picture size.
     
  14. CalvinCarr

    CalvinCarr Supporting Actor

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    But the viewing angles suffer too.
     
  15. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    To a point yes but that and its weight are the only 2 drawbacks. I'll take those over the issues with DLP and LCD and their inherent high cost.
     
  16. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    Since I'm striving for a Home Theater, not a living room, I setup my furniture to optimize my set, not pick my set to optimize my furniture setup. So this is a non-issue for me. Besides, by the time my off-angle view degrades enough to be noticable, the picture is too distorted to really call it "watching" anything.
     
  17. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    a direct view crt has poor viewing angles too if you want to get technical, no it doesn't dim but it won't look right either.
     
  18. DaveGTP

    DaveGTP Cinematographer

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    If you do some proper calibration, burn-in risk shouldn't be a big thing. Besides, with the prices on LCD and DLP RPTVs, you could buy two CRT RPTVs! [​IMG] I agree, [​IMG] with stretching!

    If you are striving for HT, and have 100% control over viewing angles (my biggest complaint with RPTVs), I'd say a standard CRT TV makes sense. Better contrast ratio/black levels (Bias alert: I personally don't like LCD contrast ratios--my DLP projector is better, but not good enough).


    I'd get the CRT RPTV and spend the extra $1-2k cash on some other good HT trappings. Speaker upgrade, HT furnishings, etc. And this coming from a guy that doesn't really like RPTVs.
     

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