Should DVD's take up the full screen on Widescreen (16x9) TV's?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Andrew*Jones, Jan 3, 2003.

  1. Andrew*Jones

    Andrew*Jones Extra

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    Hello,
    I recently purchased a Gateway Plasma TV that is 16X9. I also purchased a JVC progressive scan DVD player (JVC XV-S502SL). When I first watched a DVD (LOTR) it had the black bars on the top and bottom until I used the ZOOM feature on the TV.

    I was then playing with the DVD players features and found in the menu that the Display type was set to 4:3. I quickly changed this to 16x9 and now any DVD takes up the full screen without using the ZOOM feature.

    So my question is, am I overscanning the DVD by setting the DVD player to 16x9? Or should DVDs take up the full screen on a widescreen TV? Thanks for any help.

    Andrew Jones
     
  2. Chad R

    Chad R Cinematographer

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    It all depends on how the movie was shot. LOTR is a 2.35:1 movie, and your TV measures approximately 1.77:1. So on that movie (and others of its ilk) you will still have small black bars on the top and bottom of the screen. You will also get the improved resolution offered to 16:9 sets for weidscreen movies. Zooming in to avoid those thin bars will just devalue that resolution.
     
  3. Dave Scarpa

    Dave Scarpa Producer

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    Depending on overscan 1.85 movies may fill the screen with no or almost no letterboxing efect. 2.35 movies will still have the bars albeit lesser than on a 4:3 set. But as the poster said above the anamorphic enhancement will give you a greatly more detailed picture
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Think in terms of rectangles and their dimensions. Movies come in all sorts of rectangular shapes, from the almost-square Academy Ratio to the ultra-wide 2.76:1 of Ben-Hur. TVs, on the other hand, come in only two rectangular shapes. Obviously, those two shapes cannot accommodate all the movie shapes. Black bars will therefore always be with us.
     
  5. JohnnyHK

    JohnnyHK Stunt Coordinator

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    Something doesn't make sense here. Your DVD player should definitely be set to 16x9, but if your TV is set to Full (as it should be) you should still see small black bars on the top and bottom for 2.35 movies like LOTR to properly preserve the aspect ratio.
    You can educate yourself using the resources found here.
     
  6. Joe McKeown

    Joe McKeown Stunt Coordinator

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    Oh, Thank goodness,
    When I saw the topic I was afraid this was going to turn into a pan&scan to 16x9 thread.

    I was recently in a Best Buy where someone was looking to buy a 16x9 set so that they could watch DVD's without the black bars. I had never seen a more extreme example of "more money than brains"
     
  7. Mark Bendiksen

    Mark Bendiksen Screenwriter

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    Let the TV fit the media, not the media to the TV.
     
  9. Chris Sigua

    Chris Sigua Stunt Coordinator

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    So with all the different aspect ratios movies are shot at, why don't movies have black bars when shown in the theater since the screen is one size (i.e., like a widescreen TV)? Are the projectors adjustable based on AR to fill the screen?
     
  10. Matt DeVillier

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  11. Greg_S_H

    Greg_S_H Executive Producer

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  14. DavidPla

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    This question might have been answered a hundred times before but I just recently bought a widescreen TV and I understand completely about Anamorphic DVDs and what they should look like on it. My question is, with films shot 1.37 or 1.33 (ie. Frankenstein, Citizen Kane, Gone with the Wind ect...), should I set my TV to 4:3 with the black bars on the side of the screen or zoom in on the picture or set the image wide as well? Also if a film IS NOT Anamorphic Widescreen, I assume the film would look TOO stretched on a Widescreen TV... would I again set the TV to 4:3 creating a black box around the image or set it another way? Thanks!
     
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    David, films that were shot 1.37:1 should have the bars on the side for correct viewing.

    Now for widescreen DVD's that are NOT enhanced for widescreen TV's it get's a bit tricky. My set, for example has two options, FULL and FILL. The FULL function is the setting for widescreen DVD's that ARE ENHANCED for widescreen tv's. You wouldn't use that for "non-enhanced" DVD's, it would simply make what appeared to be an overly extreme wide movie that starred overly extreme wide people. The FILL function zooms in on the image, and either eliminates or reduces the black bars. This is indeed the function to use with letterboxed but "non-enhanced" DVD's. However, when you zoom into the image for it to properly fill the screen, you lose A LOT of sharpness of the image.
     
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