Sherwood AM9080 amp - power on?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Philip Hamm, Dec 11, 2002.

  1. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Is there any way to set up my Sherwood 9080 amplifier to turn on when my Outlaw 950 preamp turns on?

    If not (which I expect)....

    Is there a problem leaving the amp on all the time? Will it suck up a lot of electricity? Be bad for the speakers?
     
  2. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    Amps can be left on all the time without doing any harm to speakers or any of the other electronics they are connected to. Also they dont draw a lot of current @ idle (200 watts at the most) except the Class A ones which draw 4-5 times more current than their max rating. So dont worry about a thing and leave the beast on.

    Also if your amp has a remote trigger feature then even if the Outlaw doesnt have a trigger out you can connect any 12V DC adaptor from the back of your preamp (if it has switched outlets) to the trigger in on your amp. This way anytime you swith on your preamp it sends a DC signal to your amp to turn it on automatically. In case your amp doesnt have the remote trigger feature then you might have to buy one of those timed-on power strips or a power conditioner with timed-on feature to turn on your amp after your preamp has been turned on.

    Best of luck.
     
  3. Gil D

    Gil D Supporting Actor

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  4. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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  5. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    My B&K amp specifies a DC voltage between 5-12 volts and 100 to 500 mA (I think) current will trigger the amp. I have used a Ratshack AC/DC adaptor with 1/8'th lead into the B&K amp and it works perfectly well. When I turn on the 3802 the amp comes on. I just dont like to cycle my amp thru 30-40F everytime I shut it off and on. I leave my downstairs down to 60F when I go to bed and when the amp is playing it gets very toasty and goes upto atleast 100-120F. So I figured that cycling the amp thru 60F of heat plus the inrush current through the devices everytime the amp is turned on and off would be more detrimantal to the amp than leaving it on all the time. So now I leave it on all the time. It consumes 150W of power at idle but I am sure that is paying itself off in energy savings as it gets really hot and doubles as a room heater. It is almost too hot to touch when its playing at reference levels and when I put a computer fan on it I can feel the warm air coming out of the chassis with my bare hands so I am sure its contributing to my home heating. So I am not even worried by the increase in my electric bill due to the amp being on all the time.

    Now in the summer that would be a different story. Then I can probably adapt it to remote trigger as there won't be as much thermal cycling going thru the devices.


     
  6. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Pretty inefficient heating device I'd say. The S/N 9080 amp doesn't get very hot really.

    I don't think that the 12v trigger will work but I already have the appropriate cable (mini-plug on one side and RCA on the other - the amp trigger input is RCA).
     
  7. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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  8. Jeff Hipps

    Jeff Hipps Stunt Coordinator

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    In the dark ages of Hi-Fi, the Phase Linear 400 power amp did not have a power switch. Our service tech made a small business by purchasing army surplus relays. Now I don't know which one or exactly how it worked, but when he was done, there was one power cord with a male plug to go into the wall coming from the enclosure that held the relay and two power cords with an outlet on each. The preamp plugged into one cord, the Phase Linear into the other. Turning on the preamp pulled enough juice to close the relay and that powered the Phase Linear.

    This might be harder, now, as today's preamps often go into standby instead of turning off, but the principal might still work.

    Jeff Hipps
     

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