Setup for two receivers

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Ely, Aug 27, 2001.

  1. David Ely

    David Ely Supporting Actor

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    I have a very simple question. Let's say you have a dish with a single LNB and you have two receivers in the house. Can you just split the signal cable or is a dual LNB required? Basically I want two receivers to watch different channels at the same time with a single LNB. Is it possible?
     
  2. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    Short answer: No.
    A friend of mine is doing this until he gets the right equipment. Sometimes, he can watch two different channels but he is getting lucky and both channels are on the same polarization. I always advise against this.
    -Robert
     
  3. BenS

    BenS Stunt Coordinator

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    You can with Circuit City's splitter that splits the signal into four feeds. I think it costs around $90.
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    Ben
     
  4. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

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    At $90, it would be cheaper to get a second LNB, or a dual LNB, depending on what's required. Singles are only $35.
    -Scott
     
  5. BenS

    BenS Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah but if you have been upgeding receivers and you have 1 or 2 lying around then $90 for a splitter is much cheaper than buying 1 or 2 more lnb's and installing another dish outside.
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    Ben
     
  6. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Can you give me more insight on this splitter. I have dual lnb but since the dish is on a 20 foot pole on the roof, my neighbor who has spent so much time in putting it up there kind cringes when I tell him I've got another receiver. Does running through the splitter degrade the signal especially in reference to DD program.
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    [Edited last by Jerome Grate on August 28, 2001 at 01:30 PM]
     
  7. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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  8. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Thanks Robert in reference to the degradation question. Now can anyone steer me into the right direction.
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    If loving Home Theater is
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  9. David Ely

    David Ely Supporting Actor

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    Damn .... guess it wasn't such an easy question [​IMG]
    I really don't see why it would be a problem. Guess I'll just have to give it a try.
     
  10. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

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    A "splitter" isn't going to do the job. I don't know what the poster was referring to at Circuit City, but it is not a "splitter." It may be a type of multiswitch - which is what would be needed.
    Different transponders on the satellite have different polarity. With a standard splitter, all receivers in the house would only be able to tune to channels that are on a transponder with like polarity (Horizontal or Vertical). You NEED to utilize at least 2 LNBs in order to have reliable channel viewing capability on more than one receiver.
    What a multiswitch does, in essence, is act as a go-between for the receivers and LNBs. Essentially (and I'm simplifying), the multiswitch will intercept the channel request from the receiver on the way to the LNBs. It will then, if necessary, switch one LNB to the opposite polarity to allow reception of a channel on the requested polarity. It is important to note that the receiver is NOT a passive device, and the coax between the recevier and dish handles bi-directional signals. The receiver sends power and switching info out to multiswitches and LNBs on the line. By using a simple splitter, the LNBs cannot be addressed individually and, in essence, function as one.
    I've never done this, but I imagine a multiswitch could be installed at the dish, so that you have two coax lines running from the dish to the nearby switch, and one line running from the switch back to the house. The recommended installation is to have two homeruns all the way to the dish, and only install a multiswitch if you're using more than two receivers, or you're accessing more than one satellite. Quite likely, this is the recommendation for a new install simply because it's cheaper to run two cables at the initial install than it is to buy a multiswitch if you don't otherwise need one.
    Hope this helps.
    -Scott
     
  11. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

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    RE: signal degradation and digital signals:
    Though the video is encoded digitally, it is still carried on an analog carrier wave. Each obstacle you place in the signal path reduces the integrity of the original carrier signal.
    With a digital signal, you won't see traditional analog artifacts associated with a weak signal or with interference (snow, ghosts, rf interference). Being digital, however, doesn't get you off completely.
    You can liken digital satellite to streaming video on the web. As long as you have ample bandwidth, the video will look okay. As the bandwidth diminishes, you may get pixellation, stuttering, pauses - or the video may stop playing altogether!
    Thankfully, we aren't as limited in downstream satellite bandwidth as we are on the internet, and problems are few and far between. However, problems can arise. Every obstacle between your receiver and the satellite reduces bandwidth. You can see the effect in your signal strength meter. If you have 300' of cable with 3 splices and rusty F-connectors, bird droppings on your LNB, blowing branches in front of your dish, heavy cloud cover and a light rain, you may well find that your bandwidth has diminished to the point where your video quality suffers - or disappears completely. Rain Fade alone is a result of lack of bandwidth.
    Anything you can do to maximize your bandwidth will reduce downtime caused by things out of your control - most often the weather. That means keep splices, splitters, swithces, etc to a minimum.
    -Scott
     
  12. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    Scott,
    Great responses! Thanks for the explanations. I'm learning a lot as I get deeper into this whole Dish/Satellite/"digital" thing.
    I was aware, from personal experience, that it can be a bit confusing to think in "cable" mode when dealing with satellite signals and wiring. The usual dB signal loss analogy of cable installations doesn't apply. However, I was aware that there were some cable length concerns to consider with dish installations (as well as paying attention to the quality, if not the quantity of all the connections). Your explanation of how the digital signal uses an analog carrier wave brings the entire thing into focus for me and makes a lot of sense.
    And I also see why it would be easy to confuse multi-switches with "splitters" from cable experience since they look so similar in many ways. However, as you pointed out, the fact that the switches are two way devices to enable communication to and from the receiver and the LNBs (and splitters are not) explains why you can't use a splitter to do a multi-switch's job. (I would think there's at least a partial analogy between this and the two-way communications between certain printers and the printer port which requires a particulat type of cable to work properly).
    Dish 101 (and I don't mean the satellite channel) is a learning experience that I am enjoying.
    Thanks for the continuing dialogue.
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    RAF
    [Demented Video Dude since 1997]
    [Computer Maven since 1956]
    ["PITA" since 1942]
    My HT (latest update 02/05/01)
     
  13. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Thanks Scott, that answered the questions I had. I guess I better find someone who is willing to go up there and do the right thing.
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    If loving Home Theater is
    wrong, I don't want to be
    right!!!
     
  14. BenS

    BenS Stunt Coordinator

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    Scott,
    Won't this product work for what I am talking about? If not I have been told wrong and I thank you for correcting me sorry for posting bad information.
    http://www.smarthome.com/77928.html
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    Ben
     
  15. Scott Kimball

    Scott Kimball Screenwriter

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    Judging from what I see, that product is, indeed, a multiswitch. As such, I don't see why it wouldn't work.
    My only contention was with the word "splitter," as splitters and multiswitches are most definitely not the same beasts.
    -Scott
     
  16. BenS

    BenS Stunt Coordinator

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    Scott,
    Thanks for the info until this post I had thought splitters would do the job. But, your post required me to do some information seeking and I found out I was totally off base. Thanks, that will be the last time I trust a chain store salesman and just come here for info.
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    Ben
     
  17. Chuck Frady

    Chuck Frady Second Unit

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    The long and the short of it is this. If you have a Single dish with a Single LNB, then you cannot split the signal to two different receivers, even if you use a multiswitch.
    If you have a single dish, and a Dual LNB mounted, then you can use two separate receivers. You would of course have to run separate coax cables to each receiver. No matter what you hear otherwise, USE RJ-6 coax, not RJ-59. Better bandwith, better digital transmission, less loss. Just like using heavier gauge speaker wire.
    If you want to have more than two receivers in your house, then you need the Multiswitch as well as the DLNB. If you look carefully at the inputs on a multiswitch, you will see LNB A and LNB B. There is no other way around this requirement. If anyone tells you otherwise, they are absolutely wrong. The only exception to the rule is if you are mounting Two dish's on your roof, each one with a Single LNB. This is what I did until I bought the Dual LNB. Hey, I had received an extra dish for free and it certainly was cheaper than the DLNB at the time. [​IMG]
    Now I am running an RCA multiswitch, single Sony dish with a Sony DLNB, a Radio Shack High gain Element Rooftop "Over the Air" UHF/VHF antenna for local and High def channels, all feeding 4 hungry Mitsubishi receivers.
    Certainly, Digital cable is an easier way to go, but there is a certain rebellious flavor to it all when you disconnect that cable line...DAMN it though, I would love to get a cable modem instead of a DSL line...
     

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