Setting up sound levels

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Sally E, Mar 27, 2005.

  1. Sally E

    Sally E Auditioning

    Nov 23, 2003
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    I have Pioneer DVD 563-A and a Yamaha v1300. I am having trouble getting good sound levels. I have tried to set up the sound levels according to the manuals. Do I need to set up each componant separately? The sound is disappointing when watching DVD's. I have matched Polk speakers Not cheap! Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Sally
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Aug 5, 1999
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    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Hi Sally,

    The first thing you need to do is get all the speaker levels set correctly. The manual for the Yamaha should tell you how to do this. The idea is to get the center, front-left and -right, and rear speakers all at the same volume.

    The subwoofer volume, if you have one, needs to be adjusted, too, but it can be a little trickier. You can use whatever method the Yamaha or subwoofer manual recommends, but keep in mind that you basically want it to blend well with the other speakers, not be so loud that all you hear is “booming,” or so soft it’s hard to hear. It might take a few movies of adjusting back and forth to get it right.

    The DVD player also has to be set up properly via its menu. Hopefully you have it connected to the receiver with a digital cable, either coaxial or optical. If you’re using the regular RCA cables with red and white connectors, you won’t be getting the full 5.1 channel surround sound capabilities.

    Even if everything is set up correctly you will find that DVDs typically have to be turned up higher than other components in your system, like a cable box or CD player. That’s natural, nothing to be worried about. If the Yamaha allows separate input level adjustments for each component, you can use that feature to compensate or level match the DVD players to the other components. You could do this by turning the DVD player’s input level up higher, and the other components lower.

    Hope this helps.

    Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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