Setting speaker frequency

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by cameronV, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. cameronV

    cameronV Auditioning

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    Hello all,

    I am new to these forums and have a limited knowledge of audio equipment.

    I just purchased a pair of Infinity Primus 360 speakers. I have them hooked up to a Sony STR-DB940 receiver. The receiver has frequency adjustments for bass, midrange, and treble. My speakers' spec sheet lists the crossover frequencies at 350Hz and 3300Hz. Should my receiver's frequency settings somehow coincide with these crossover frequencies? I'm not sure exactly what the receiver crossover frequencies mean; are they a maximum or minimum frequency for each driver, or a crossover frequency? If someone could clarify this concept and provide me with some recommendations on how to set up my reciever I would greatly appreciate it.
     
  2. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Try to find out online if (or in the owner's manual) what the frequencies of the adjustment knobs are. The internal crossover frequencies within your speakers doesn't have anything to do with the knobs on the receiver. You could buy a calibration disc and do some frequency sweeps to see what the best position for the knobs would be based on peaks and valleys in your frequency response . . . or you could simply adjust them by ear. I leave mine set at zero (middle) all the time.
     
  3. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Most speaker designers choose their crossovers designs to ensure flat response across the audio spectrum. So, in a properly deigned speaker, the crossover frequencies shouldn't matter (although, if you wanted to get into esoterica, you could replace the passive crossovers with active ones, and knowing the frequencies that were originally used might well be helpful.)

    the primus 360 anechoic frequency response is plotted here, in case you're interested. The one crossover you should worry about is your mains--subwoofer crossover.

    You might, if you have a sufficiently fine grained equalizer, wish to knock the 80--110 Hz region just a tad, although that's really a matter of taste... (It might be related to the impedence curve, but I'm speculating wildly.)
     
  4. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    On the other hand, that 80--110 Hz hump is a feature seen in many good quality loudspeakers, so, "knocking it out", as I put it, might not be aesthetically warranted.
     

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