Selling a house with a serious home theater?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Neil Weinstock, Jul 18, 2001.

  1. Neil Weinstock

    Neil Weinstock Stunt Coordinator

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    I was just wondering what happens when you go to sell a house with a really fancy home theater install. It must be a strange experience. What equipment do you leave, and what do you take with you? How do you assess the value? What do potential buyers think?
    Just wondering...
     
  2. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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    While I have no plans of moving from my house during the remaining years of my life this question did come up during the construction phase of my HT project. The general consensus among friends who know about such things was that since I was making so much of the HT a "permanent" part of the structure (all the electrical upgrades, fixtures, wiring, as well as the built-in shelving, etc. etc.) this would definitely add value to the house during resale. And, with appreciation of real estate in general, the value of the additional installation would probably outpace any depreciation involved.
    In other words, when I use my "HT instead of a BMW" argument to defend spending the amount of money I did on my HT there is a certain amount of validity to pointing out that not only do you have the depreciation that comes with an automobile purchase, but you could also make a strong argument that a permanent HT installation also offers appreciable appreciation (pun intended).
    My guiding philosophy was to sink some of the serious money into those things that would, more or less, be considered permanent fixtures since you would really be only having these expenditures once and you could probably recoup most of them if you chose to move later on.
    All the "transient" stuff (the audio and video equipment) will, of course change as the years go by, but that's the nature of the game of course, and something we constantly deal with. The fact that I've not made any significant upgrade to any equipment in the bast 6 months is something that even surprises me, but I'm sure that this will change as new toys become available.
    I've strayed a bit from the original question, but I think, in a nutshell, that the answer to the resale value of a permanent HT installation depends on the quality of the installation, the current market conditions, the interest in HT on the part of potential buyers and the amount of time flexibility that the seller has. While this doesn't provide a stock answer for every situation I'm confident that in the majority of cases an investment in HT will be an asset rather than a liability.
    (No, I'm not selling, and if I were, I already have 2 or 3 neighbors who want first crack at my home)
    [​IMG]
    ------------------
    RAF
    [Demented Video Dude since 1997]
    [Computer Maven since 1956]
    ["PITA" since 1942]
    My HT (latest update 02/05/01)
     
  3. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    I think a home theater CAN add value to a home, but I also think it's harder to sell a house with a dedicated HT than a house without it, at least currently.
    It's a very specialized room (if it's a dedicated HT), and most buyers are not willing to pay extra for it. They might even want to pay less, since they have to remodel.
    However, if you advertise in the right place, I'm sure there are HT enthusiasts like those in this forum that would be willing to pay a premium for a nice HT.
    Either way, when the time comes to sell, you will probably have enjoyed it enough that the cost was worth it anyway. Like RAF points out, compared to an expensive car a HT is cheap and doesn't depreciate very much (excluding some equipment).
    /Mike
     
  4. Kyle-K

    Kyle-K Stunt Coordinator

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    I think its along the lines of a swimming pool...
    Whether it hurts or helps your home value depends on whether or not the buyer actually wants one...
    If the buyer wants it it might increase the value of your home, but it will definately make your home more desirable to the buyer...
    On the other hand, if the buyer does not want it, they will reduce the value of the home, since they'll want to remodel it (what a crime that would be)
    --kyle
     
  5. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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  6. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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  7. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    Just over two years again I sold my last house that I had built a theater in. It was just RPTV and was not a real custom dedicated room but was built just for my theater use. I sold it myself by showing it on Saturdays with open houses. The couple that ended up buying the house was sold on it after my Twister DVD 5.1 demo believe it or not. The theater room in reality probably lowered the value of the home, If it had been an extra bed room it would have increased the value. But with the final buyers it was a cool thing that no other house in the price range($115,000.)had.
    In the new house the dedicated theater has a space that could be a closet to make it a bedroom but I had the builder move the window so there are no windows what so ever in the theater so it now can no longer be a bedroom. [​IMG]"O"well! I do not plan on moving again.
    Wes
     
  8. RAF

    RAF Lead Actor

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