Sega sinks to new depths

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by JamesH, Dec 8, 2003.

  1. JamesH

    JamesH Supporting Actor

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    In the midst of what could be looked at as a semi-hostile takeover by Sammy, Sega has taken an action that could have industry-killing implications if successful. According to this link, Sega has basically decided to sue the makers of Simpsons Road Rage because it ripped off Crazy Taxi.

    http://www.gamespot.com/all/news/news_6085112.html

    While I don't think anyone can deny that Road Rage is derived from Crazy Taxi on some level, a win by Sega here would set a dangerous precedent. What if the Konami decides to sue the makers of Metal Slug because the two games are similar? Or what if Nintendo decides to sue every company that has ever created 2-d or 3-d platformers because they borrow too heavily from the Mario games? Then, the makers of Pitfall sue Nintendo? Lets hope Sega is laughed out of court here, otherwise every entry into an established game genre is an invitation for a lawsuit.
     
  2. Dave F

    Dave F Cinematographer

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    If I remember correctly, there have been similar video game lawsuits before. I think they were dismissed, but I'm sure there is some one here with better memory. =)

    -Dave
     
  3. Kyle McKnight

    Kyle McKnight Cinematographer

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    One was between two arcade games, one version of Street Fighter 2 and a different game that was basically identical.
     
  4. BrianB

    BrianB Producer

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  5. JamesH

    JamesH Supporting Actor

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    I guess this opens up a bigger question: should companies be able to patent game ideas? And if so, does Sega really have the right to assert control over the mission based driving genre? Driver was out before Crazy Taxi and was really the breakout game for the genre, and there may have been some lesser games even before Driver.

    I've always thought that when a game is released, the ideas in it become public domain for other developers to build on. That's how improvement comes about. Where would shooters be today if the owner of the River Raid patent was the only company allowed to make them? The long development time on games allows plenty of time for the originator to profit from the creation. The ideas behind games don't even make them great, it's all in the execution. Execution is why, years later, Halo and GTA3 are unsurpassed. Companies have attempted to clone them, but how many have been successful?
     
  6. BrianB

    BrianB Producer

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  7. David Williams

    David Williams Cinematographer

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    Wow, sure took them a while to find a courthouse. Why bother suing over a game that is a) almost 2 years old and b) wasn't very successful to begin with. What's the point? Desperate for cash? Hoping Fox will settle?
     
  8. Dave F

    Dave F Cinematographer

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  9. Bill MacAdoo

    Bill MacAdoo Stunt Coordinator

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  10. David Williams

    David Williams Cinematographer

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    I guess somehow in my mind I crossed crappy reviews with poor sales. Oh well. This isn't to say I didn't enjoy the game, but boy did it get critically savaged.
     
  11. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    There's really only a handful of gaming concepts out there anyway. If more developers/publishers start writing patents on elements of the games it could either stiffle the industry or, through need, bolster creativity.
     

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