Scanner Resolution questions.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Watson, Jan 16, 2003.

  1. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    I am looking at several scanners, and a printer, and have found several little issues to resolve or clarify before buying.

    1. Would I be happy with a 1200 x 1200 DPI machine? My old printer is only 720 x 720 (I think), and I can see dots easily from photos printed on it, so is 1200 DPI significantly better?

    2. Is a "square" DPI spec such as 2400 x 2400 significantly better than a DPI spec that is assymetrical?

    The assymetrical machine (Epson 1660) is 1600 x 3200, and the square machine (HP 4570 C) is 2400 x 2400. The sales person at the B&M store dismissed the Epson, with the assymetrical spec, as a waste of money. But the Epson has a smaller footprint. BTW, the machines are priced the same Cdn$299.

    3. He also said HP was a bit better in containing software for making VCDs, tho said I could do that from the Epsons with any good burning program such as Nero. (Which I have, but anything that is easier to use than Nero would be good for me)

    Any comments or info appreciated!
     
  2. Kris McLaughlin

    Kris McLaughlin Stunt Coordinator

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    John,
    you might want to check out this link: Scantips. There's plenty of good info there about scanners & resolution.
    Hope this helps,
     
  3. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Printing resolution is a misleading figure. It only defines the pitch of the printer' stepping motor, not the actual number of printed dots that make up the image. A print 'dot' is usually made up of several together to form the colour. You'll find that as the price goes up, the quoted resolution does too. Don't worry too much about the numbers.
    Scanning resolution is different. Look for truep resolution, not interpolated. My Epson Perfection 2450 can scan at true 2400dpi, which means a 35mm negative comes in at around 3400x2200 screen pixels. That is a very big image indeed and allows really big printing sizes. However the scanning software allows interpolated scans of much higher figures - resulting in bigger files but no more detail.
    In the reviews I looked up for scanners when I was considering the Epson, I didn't see any mention of assymetrical figures.
     
  4. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    I don't know what your budget is, but the best printers for printing photos and other digital art are the Canon S9000 (and the smaller brother, the Canon S900) and the Epson 2200 and the Epson 1280. All are asymmetrical, 2880x1440 DPI or something similar, and effectively put down 300 PPI (pixels per inch), which makes them indistinguishable from photolab printers.
    The Canons are 6 ink printers I believe, and the Epsons are 7 ink. The paper you use for these printers is extremely important however...different papers have different ink absorpion and spread properties, affecting the quality of the output.
    Use Google to find reviews on these printers, and you can look at the Printer forum at www.dpreview.com. These printers are very-well regarded by professional photographers and amateurs alike.
    BTW, the Epson 2200 is capable of borderless printing, and can take paper rolls for printing panoramas (maximum of 13"x129" in Windows XP). I'm not sure about the Canon ones though.
     
  5. Max Leung

    Max Leung Producer

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    A good site for printer and scanner reviews:
    http://www.photo-i.co.uk/index.html
    Be sure to check out the reviews on the new Canon i950, as well as the reviews on the Canon S900, Epson 2100 (2200 in the North America), etc.
     

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