Say "au revoir" to email

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Dennis Nicholls, Jul 18, 2003.

  1. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    Time to say "au revoir" to email in France:

    http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp..._with__e_mail_

    We don't even have the equivalent to a "cultural ministry" in this country. I wonder what kind of mischief they would get into if we did.

    I guess our annual "flag-burning prohibition Constitutional amendment" in Congress is our closest equivalent to the Gaullic rooting out of verbal pollution.
     
  2. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    And France wonders why no one will take them seriously. [​IMG]
     
  3. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    I'm sure some are thinking that is backlash from our Freedom Fries escapade, but that was only in 2-3 spots.. NOT nationwide. Oh well at the end of ther day I don't care about these silly name changes.
     
  4. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    This has absolutely nothing to do with recent events. This kind of stuff has been going on for years. In the mid nineties, a very controversial law was passed stipulating that 40% of any radio station's music programing must be french.

    It is merely an attempt to protect the french language and culture (namely against English) and slowdown the american cultural juggernaut.

    Trouble is, in this particular instance they are at least 5 years late.

    --
    Holadem
     
  5. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    I don't think this has anything to do with Freedom Fries. Years ago I read something about how they have to call CDs by some stupid long name, like "discque de compaque" or whatever, I don't speak French so I don't recall the proper spelling. Basically the abreviation is considered English so they couldn't use it. They have a bunch of rules like this.
     
  6. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    I'm sure this predates current events. Years ago they decided that 'computer' wasn't French, so the invented the term 'compte de numerique' instead. They do appear to be a 'patron pointu-d'une chevelure' as Dilbert would say.....
     
  7. Danny Tse

    Danny Tse Producer

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    All along, I was thinking "ceedee" was French for CD [​IMG]
     
  8. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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  9. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    I'll back up that Ordinateur, although French isn't my first language (nor one that I speak well anymore).

    Todd
     
  10. Vincent Matis

    Vincent Matis Second Unit

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    Yep, a computer = un ordinateur
    and yes, this has been going on for a long time... [​IMG]

    Cheers,

    Vincent
     
  11. Francois Caron

    Francois Caron Cinematographer

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    One fact is certain. Courriel is a widely used French Canadian term. In a way, it's a compressed version of courrier électronique. There has never been any resistance in the use of the term. Today it's widely used and accepted.

    Most of our French language computer expressions are pretty much straightforward translations of the English language expressions. In some cases, more than one definition is available, and in some cases the translated version is simply the English version spoken with a French Canadian accent (NOT a French accent! [​IMG] )

    A few examples to clear things up a bit...

    CD = Cédé
    CD-ROM = Cédérom (roll the 'R')
    Compact disk = Disque compacte
    Computer = Ordinateur
    Memory = Mémoire
    Hard drive = Disque rigide, disque dur
    Floppy diskette (a.k.a. floppy, diskette) = disquette
    Processor = Processeur
    Network = Réseau
    Cable = Câble
    DVD = DVD (pronounced dévédé)
    Video card = Carte vidéo
    Keyboard = Clavier
    Mouse = Souris (Yes! The rodent in French!)
    Liquid Crystal Display = Affichage à Cristaux Liquide
    LCD = LCD (The true translation is ACL, but it's not used all that often)

    There's plenty more expressions out there, but I'm not ready to list out all the words in my English/French computer dictionary! [​IMG]

    [rant mode on]

    As for the French, they've been using modern English words and expressions in their vocabulary for a very long time now. And it bugs me to no end! Take "Home Theater" for example. They call it "Home Cinema" which is so close to the English pronounciation that you wonder if they're speaking French at all! We prefer to use the expression "Cinéma Maison" which not only sounds right, but is also a direct translation of the English expression.

    We tend to use the French language whenever possible. We still have a collection of words that are on the whole English (Hot-dog, hamburger, f*cké...), but that's mainly because the French equivalent simply doesn't sound right or doesn't properly express the emotion we feel deep within ourselves (especially f*cké [​IMG] ). In some cases, certain expressions were never meant to be translated and we accept that. As for the rest, if it sound right in French, we use it.

    But what about the French themselves? They behave as if they're embarassed to use the French language as it was meant to be used! What is their problem? Don't they have any pride in their language? Why would they mangle it to the point you actually question which language they're speaking?

    [rant mode off]

    I should go to bed now. It's been a long week. [​IMG]
     
  12. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    Francois, the problem isn't the French so much, its the French government. If I recall correctly, my CD example involved what DJs could say on the radio. The thing about e-mail is that in any official document, they can't say e-mail now.
     
  13. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    Francois, I will take French expressions over the ridiculously sounding Canadian French expressions (Cinema Maison ??!!!) any day! [​IMG]. A lot of canadian french is a verbatim translation of english expressions, and it shows.

    Some expressions don't translate too well, they should be left alone.

    The reason cinema maison sounds so UNfrench is the lack of article (determinant?). In english, you can stick two nouns together and the relationship between them is implied: Door handle, home theater or even bathroom, which is one word. In french, you need something to link them, I believe it's called an article (eh... grammar school was long ago). Home theater therefore translates as Cinema DE maison. Bathroom is Salle DE bain. How ridiculous does Salle Bain sound? Just as ridiculous as Cinema maison.

    Canadian french is full of such atrocities. My sister who has been living in Hull for close to 5 years now is starting to sound like you guys [​IMG].

    In conclusion, the french have found the best solution: If you can't translate it, ban it [​IMG]

    --
    Holadem
     
  14. Francois Caron

    Francois Caron Cinematographer

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  15. David Lawson

    David Lawson Screenwriter

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    This is not aboot the use of the word courrier électronique, This is aboot freedom, this is aboot respect..

    What the hell are you laughing aboot?
     
  17. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Agreed on the reason for it,every few years they find some popular english word that thas crept in and seek to eliminate it.
     
  18. Chris Derby

    Chris Derby Second Unit

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    "We have ways of making you pronounce the letter O, pal."
     
  19. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    (Shrugs)....f**k 'em.

    ...sorry, but that was about all I felt after reading the article.
     
  20. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    If the French don't like the idea of using English terms to describe email, then they better get off the internet completely. What do you think HTML code is in?

    [Le' Bolde]Surely not French[/Le' Bolde] [​IMG]
     

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