Saw an odd comparison of widescreen vs. full frame

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JJR512, Oct 17, 2001.

  1. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    I was at a Suncoast Video the other day (a mall video store, if you don't have them near you) and saw on the counter a graphic display of the differences between widescreen and full frame video. The display was trying to illustrate how widescreen is better, how with full frame you lose the part of the picture on the sides. To do this, they showed you a screen (a 4:3 ratio screen) with a full screen image, and another screen with a widescreen image, and there were arrows pointing out the extra stuff on the sides of the widescreen image that you couldn't see in the full frame image.
    Now the odd thing about this was that the full screen image had more to it along the top and bottom than the widescreen image.
    So if they're trying to educate the general public about the benefits of widescreen, they're not doing a very good job of it. The average person will wonder what good is the extra stuff along the sides if you miss stuff along the top and bottom.
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  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    I think they use "The Abyss", which was filmed in the evil Super35 format. Not exactly the best example
    Jeff Kleist
     
  3. John Stone

    John Stone Supporting Actor

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    quote:
    Now the odd thing about this was that the full screen image had more to it along the top and bottom than the widescreen image.
    [/quote]
    That sounds correct. What you describe is how Super 35 films look when transferred to 1.33:1 (except most special effects shots, which are cropped even more).
    Hopefully Suncoast also showed how a Scope film looks after it is panned and scanned.
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    [Edited last by John St on October 17, 2001 at 10:38 PM]
     
  4. William Ward

    William Ward Supporting Actor

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    I mentioned this somewhere before. Using one screenshot can make open matte/super 35 show more than the OAR/WS version of the movie. Now, show a special effect shot of the same movie and you'll see that it's panned and scanned. Open Matte defenders will always show a non-effect shot to try and prove that there isn't any missing information in the OM version. My opinion: Just keep it the way it was in theaters. If it isn't changed, that becomes a marketing tool. (Unaltered form of the movie)
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  5. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    The film used was Titanic (James Cameron's version). It was a scene, if I recall correctly, with the captain of the ship in the center, gripping a railing in front of him. In the full screen shot, you could see his hands gripping the railing, including his fingers wrapped around it. In the widescreen shot, you could barely make out the top of his hands.
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  6. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Titanic is also shot in Super35. Congratulations Suncoast!
     
  7. JJR512

    JJR512 Supporting Actor

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    I don't really know what Super 35 is, so I don't know why that effects things as it does in this display. I actually started a new thread to ask what Super 35, open matte, and other similar stuff means: http://www.hometheaterforum.com/uub/Forum15/HTML/031939.html
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  8. Mark Bendiksen

    Mark Bendiksen Screenwriter

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  9. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  10. Bjorn Olav Nyberg

    Bjorn Olav Nyberg Supporting Actor

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    Is an image of this posted online somewhere? I would like to see it. (I've got the WS LD at home, but never seen the 4:3 version)
    I agree that an anamorphic 2.35:1 movie would make an even better example, but even making the general public know that there is a difference is a start.
    Examples of this are present at widescreen.org, including Indiana Jones and the last crusade
    http://www.widescreen.org/examples.html
    Check the last picture from Romancing the stone for another "interesting" way to make the picture "fit".
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  11. Bjorn Olav Nyberg

    Bjorn Olav Nyberg Supporting Actor

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    By the way, if you are looking at the examples on widescreen.org, thay are linking to an example of anamorpghic 2.35:1 filming in Rumble in the Bronx, but this same page had some other interesting examples as well.
    The page is: http://userfs.cec.wustl.edu/~sm6/widescreen/
    Check out The fifth element in particular, it does showcase exactly what I imagine is happening in the Titanic example mentioned above. What it does also do is show some examples of the CGI visual effects, which has to be Pan & scanned.
    Also check out The usual suspects, another Super35 example, which in my opinion is an even better example of superior framing in the 2.35:1 version.
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  12. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

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    Here's my idea of how to do an in store demo of the difference. Take a print from a movie that will not have any information lost at the top or bottom when displayed in a widescreen format. Then put a frame representing the pan and scan ratio and attach it to the widescreen print. Allow this frame to slide back and forth on the print.
    Now the customer can do his own pan and scan. I think he'll really see the difference this way.
    Another, more elaborate way, would be to have a dvd displaying the widescreen format. Then have a frame in the pan and scan ratio that the viewer can move back and forth on the screen with the dvd remote. Now the viewer can try to do a pan and scan himself and the movie plays.
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  13. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Yeah, showing the benfits of widescreen vs pan&scan by using a frame taken from Super 35 film seems like a REALLY odd way of doing it...
    The best example IMO would be to show the roof-scenes from "Ghostbusters". The VHS P&S pnly shows 3 ghostbusters, since it's cropped, while the WS shows all 4...
    /Mike
     

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