Samsung HLN617W vs Philips Cineos 55PL9773

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Patrick M, Jul 24, 2003.

  1. Patrick M

    Patrick M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2000
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Got a chance to see these two sets side by side today using different sources and different inputs. In every case, the Philips beat the Sammy in clarity, sharpness, and natural color.

    Dithering was completely absent and rainbow effects were extremely hard to see. We watched different scenes from Superbit Desperado, Star Trek Nemesis, and The Matrix all on a Pioneer 47Ai using Monster S-Vid and component cables. The Philips use of pixel-plus and "natural motion" technology was astounding, and was a great example of what it can do with a 480i image using s-video. It was clearly a better image than the Sammy using component. What I really liked was the quality of standard tv broadcasts, something that is usually a drawback with other HD RPTV's.

    Some other notes...

    - It comes on a swivel stand
    - It has a sub - output!
    - There are two sets a 44" and a 55", with a higher-end model (Matchline) and a lower end that will be sold at BB and CC. The Matchline will add Pixel-Plus, Anti-glare screen, and metal speaker grills.
    - The 44" will go for $3299, the 55" at $3999. Non-Matchline will be $300 cheaper for each set.
    - Carl Zeiss lenses

    And no, I'm not a Philips rep, but I do work for Tweeter and was honestly impressed by this product. Oh and we had the thing hooked up to a new Sony 9000ES receiver which was quite nice too!
     
  2. John KG

    John KG Auditioning

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do you recommend paying a Philips tech about $300 in order to professionally calibrate a Cineos 55PL977S for color and grayscale, via the internal service menu using a color meter? I have a deposit on a 55PL977S at Tweeter in Madison (just north of Nashville, Tennessee). I briefly talked to the manager about having the set calibrated (grayscale, color temp, etc) and he said something about using a DVD. I now believe he was referring to the Avia Guide to Home Theater as opposed to "professional" calibration by a certified technician. Every review I have read indicates "all" televisions need calibration, even factory fresh, in order to obtain optimum performance, and this type calibration cannot be done using only brightness, contrast, sharpness, color, and tint control even with an Avia disk.
     

Share This Page