Samsung DLP Artifacts

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Robert*B, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. Robert*B

    Robert*B Auditioning

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    I recently purchased a Samsung HL-R5087W HDTV DLP TV for a new HT setup. In general, HD looks great, as does a DVD. However, watching standard definition TV seems to be another story. In some scenes, the background will display mosaic-looking patterns that move around. Very noticeable. They're not there all the time; they come and go. Also, in some backgrounds, a greenish hue (that doesn't belong there) will appear around certain objects. Again, it's not always there, but it comes and goes. For TV, I have Dish Network satellite. One of their technicians came out and looked at it and was unable to correct it. He ultimately suggested replacing the satellite HD receiver, but is uncertain that it will fix the problem. Does this problem sound at all familiar to anyone? Is it the TV or the satellite signal? Thanks.[​IMG]
     
  2. aaron campbell

    aaron campbell Second Unit

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    Robert, If the picture looks good on all but standard, I would say its the signal. Garbage in = garbage out

    Aaron
     
  3. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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    You could be seeing a DLP "dithering" effect. If too much of the same area of the screen contains the same color/shading the system has to resort to "dithering" due to inherent limitations in the single-chip DLP design.

    In most cases this is usually an indication that your contrast is set too high for that source, resulting in "blown-out" whites and reducing gradations of colors. Try turning the contrast down and the effect will probably go away. If the picture seems too dark at the point the dithering stops then bump the brightness up a little. Finally, you may want to save the setting you end up with as a User Preference for SD sources only.
     
  4. Robert*B

    Robert*B Auditioning

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    Thanks, gents. I did try the adjustments Joseph mentions and it does seem to help some, but it's not there yet. I know I shouldn't expect the HD-level quality, but I would like for the SD to look at least about as good as it does on my 36" CRT.

    Bob
     
  5. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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    Well ... You could also be seeing deinterlacing artifacts. Are you using the deinterlacer in the Samsung or the one built-in to the satellite receiver?

    If your Dish receiver has a "upconvert/passthrough/fixed" setting, try setting it to "passthrough". This will feed a 480i signal to your Samsung for SD broadcasts and will allow the Samsung's internal deinterlacer/scaler circuitry to upscale the 480i to 720p. Depending on the deinterlacer in the Samsung (hopefully it's a Faroudja) this may further clear things up for you. (Of course, if you're already feeding 480i to the Samsung, try setting the receiver's setting to "fixed"; it's possible that the receiver could have a better deinterlacer than the Samsung.)

    Since the Samsung's native resolution is 720p, if your receiver lacks a "passthrough" option, but does offer a 480p/720p/1080i setting, you could also try setting that option to 720p. Setting it at 1080i means that the receiver is scaling the SD 480i to 1080i and then the Samsung has to deinterlace/scale this signal back down to 720p. This could also be introducing quite a few artifacts of the type you're describing.

    Keep in mind that no matter what you do, the SD signal is always going to look soft compared to the HD signal ...
     

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