Samsung developing thin direct view TVs

Discussion in 'Displays' started by David_Rivshin, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Here's something I wasn't expecting to happen, but am excited about. This article describes a new CRT technology Samsung is planning to start manufacturing at the end of this year (I'd expect them for next fall refresh). 32" CRT depth is reported to be 35cm(14"), with a finished TV depth of 40cm (16"). This is about 10" thinner than current 32" CRT TVs, and about the same depth as current DLP RPTVs.
    The article also reports that Samsung is developing tubes which are 4" thinner still for production 2 years later.

    If Samsung is the only one who has such TV's on the market I can definitely imagine them having a competitive advantage. Currently my entertainment center is sitting 8" farther into the room than it otherwise would to accommodate the bulk of my 32" CRT (Panasonic 32HL42). I'd love to get that space back, and I'm sure many a buyer would have an easier time justifying a TV in the 30-36" range to the SO if it wasn't as deep.

    -- Dave

    Note: I was originally referred to this article by www.arstechnica.com.
     
  2. Yohan Pamudji

    Yohan Pamudji Second Unit

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    I saw that Ars Technica article too. Price will be key (they say roughly $1000), but this is exactly what I've been hoping for--CRT brightness, contrast, and color fidelity, in a less-than-enormous container. 32" CRTs weigh 150+ lbs. for crying out loud. I would love to get a 32" CRT that weighs less than 100 lbs. A projector would be sweet, but alas I have no room for one.

    Here's hoping that you're right about the fall 2005 refresh. If image quality is up to snuff, I'll be first in line to get one.
     
  3. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Current 32" HDTV street prices are in the range of $700-900 (from a quick search), so I hope these new tubes are in the same range (or lower by next year). I also want lower weight tubes, mine is around 180lbs IIRC, and I fear I'll have to hire some big guys to move it for me whenever I move. I understand that most of the weight is the glass itself, and a good part of that is because of the extra thickness in front for a flat screen. These tubes should have less glass in the conical part, but if that glass has to be thicker than we may end up with about the same weight.

    My plans right now are actually to get a front projector, and have a screen come down infront of my tube (which would still be used for daily viewing). Easiest way to get a 100" image in an apartment [​IMG]

    -- Dave
     
  4. Yohan Pamudji

    Yohan Pamudji Second Unit

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    Just found out (late to the party) that Toshiba and Canon have jointly developed a similar solution they are dubbing "SED". Basically instead of one big gun they have a separate gun for each pixel. Estimates are that they'll ramp up production by late 2005.

    Wow, I actually thought about doing the tube/projector setup just like you're thinking about. Eerie how similar our thought processes are [​IMG]
     
  5. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    That sounds alot closer to LCD/LCoS/DLP/Plasma in that it'll need a digital signal to drive it. Actually it'd be very similar to plasma, as I believe in plasma displays an electrical charge stimulates an individual cell, which then glows, similar to a phosphor pixel hit by an electron beam. I could imagine that a SED display would have better contrast than the other technologies, and almost certainly better blacks then LCD, LCoS, and DLP since it won't have light leakage issues.
    I was under the impression that an electron gun was too expensive to have so many of them, even if they don't need to be aimed. Now having say 4 guns, one for each quadrant of the tube, might be an interesting way of shrinking a CRT. Of course the shape of the glass required would probably be pretty hard to make...

    It's good to know that people are still working on new display technologies. I always like a choice.
     

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