S-Video Questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt Harwood, Apr 8, 2002.

  1. Matt Harwood

    Matt Harwood Agent

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    Hi All,
    Has anyone used the Lutron Quick-Port S-video connectors for in-wall wiring between DVD and TV? I have some that I connected according to the instructions using Cat5 cable. Yesterday I went to hook up my new DVD and got no picture. What could I have done wrong and what should I double check. Also, with S-video carrying separate signals on each wire, if only one connection was bad, wouldn't I still get some picture, or is it an all-or-nothing situation with S-video?
    Please help! I'm really frustrated.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    First check to be sure that the problem is not outside the wall, namely bring the DVD player to the same wall jack where the TV is and plug the cable from the TV directly into the player instead of the wall.
    As far as the Lutron system in the wall goes, there are lots of places where the problem could be, I would actually use a voltmeter as a circuit continuity tester early in the game. Do not poke a paper clip into any of the tiny holes in any S-video jack. Use a small sewing needle or common pin instead. Wires with alligator clips on the ends, available from Radio Shack, come in handy.
    When you crouch down looking at the wall, the upper left hole in the visible S-video jack at one location should be connected to the upper left hole at the other location, and so on.
    Beware of connectors where you insert a wire or cable into a hole and crimp it with something and magically the connection is made. Occasionally they fail from day one, especially if the hole is bigger than the cable or not quite the same shape.
    As far as getting some picture, if just the #2 (C) line is broken you get a black and white picture. If the #1 (Y) and #2 lines were shorted together you get a grainy picture. If just the #1 line is broken or if the #1 and #2 lines were exchanged inside one of the wall jacks, I am not sure what happens.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Matt: I'm not familar with the Lutron product, but the others I have seen for this purpose require CO-AXIAL cable, not Cat 5. AFIK Cat 5 will not maintain the 75 ohms impedence required for a video connnection. It's great for Digital signals, but not analog.

    Do you have a link for the product?
     
  4. Matt Harwood

    Matt Harwood Agent

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    Try this link:
    http://www.tselectronic.com/viewpage...421a310e6f0761
    This is where I bought mine and followed the instructions to the letter. I'm going to try to test for continuity using a Multi-meter tonight, and double check my cables (one came out of the package with a broken pin).
    Also, my monitor is a 16+ year old Hitachi RPTV. It's in great shape and works well, and has S-video connections. Has S-video changed so that there might be a compatibility problem?
    If all else fails, maybe I'll use an old S-video cable and install it into the back of the Leviton connector instead of the Cat 5 stuff. Thoughts on that plan?
    Thanks for all your help.
     
  5. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    I currently use my Cat5 network wiring for A/V distribution with great success. I used standard RJ45 jacks and made my own breakout adaptors however so that I could switch signal types without changing wall mounted jacks. The adaptors you used seem interesting but don't allow you to add the audio to the same Cat5 cable that I also do. I suspect that you have a wiring problem (color coding) or that you haven't "punched down" the wire fully into the connector. Cat5 is 100 ohm while video is 75 ohm impedence which is ,as they put it, "close enough for government work". I've run about 200 feet with no signal loss or distortion. Some more expensive adaptors use 75-100 ohm matching transformers and claim over 1000 foot distance capabilities. Video bandwidth falls quite nicely into the capabilities of Cat5 cable. I found that composite video doesn't carry as well over long distances and any hum on audio can be removed with audio isolation transformers intended for automotive amps.
     
  6. Matt Harwood

    Matt Harwood Agent

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    I'll double check my wiring tonight. I was at least happy to find that it wasn't my TV or DVD player. Connecting them directly resulted in a fine picture.
    Argh--for you guys who like to tweak and tinker with this stuff, I'm envious. I just want to set it up and have it work. This fine tuning is making me nuts. But I know the results will be worth it. For what I've spent, I plan on getting the most I can out of it.
    Thanks for the advice.
     
  7. JimN

    JimN Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Matt,

    I am using the Leviton QuickPort products also. However I was leary of the s-video connector. Therefore I decided to use dual runs of RG-6 coax terminated with BNC connectors , four quickport BNC connectors and two BNC-to-Svid breakout cables. I felt better about keeping everything at 75 Ohms since I have a fairly long run.
     

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