S-Video and old VHS tapes?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Micheal*Johnson, Jan 28, 2003.

  1. Micheal*Johnson

    Micheal*Johnson Auditioning

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    I plan to upgrade to an S-video VCR and a t.v. with S-video inputs, but I'm wondering about all my old VHS tapes- will my old VHS tapes output an S-video signal when played on an S-video VCR? Or, do video tapes have to be recorded in S-video to output an S-video signal?

    I have the same question regarding component video also.

    Related questions:
    - in terms of VCRs, are "Super VHS" and "S-video" the same thing?
    - are special tapes required for use with S-video VCRs?
    - what does the VCR feature SQPB (Super VHS Quasi Playback) mean?
     
  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    They are still composite video on VHS, The S in S video stands for "Seperate" as in seperating the luminance(Brightness) and Chromanance (Color) signals. The connector did first come with SVHS decks because SVHS stores those 2 values seperately, one of the advantages over VHS in addition to the additional resolution.

    If you wish to record in SVHS, you need SVHS tapes. New decks have a mode called SVHS ET, but frankly, it has some major issues.

    Since most SVHS and VHS decks share the same innards, basically it contains a chip that allows you to play back an SVHS tape at VHS resolution. So it'll look like a really nice commercial VHS tape, but won't have the additional lines of resolution
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    I disagree slightly.

    Ordinary VHS tapes will play minuscul-ly better on an SVHS VCR compared with on a regular VCR. The reason is the S-video connection rather than the SVHS circuits. This makes a simpler video signal path skipping specifically the TV comb filter. The difference is not profound because tape, particularly if recorded on a cheap VCR or recorded using high speed duplication, has so many other limitations.

    (They don't make many, any?, regular VHS VCR's with S-video output.)

    Actually all common consumer VCR's including regular VHS record luminance and chrominance separately, using formats similar to S-video.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Michael,

    First, welcome to the Forum!

    Answering your questions:

     

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