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Running component cables through wall

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by Chuck Paskovics, Aug 19, 2006.

  1. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm currently having a house built and the layout will put my rack and tv across the room from one another. What i'd like to do is run component cables under the house (crawl) and in the wall to passthrough wall jacks as seen below:

    (front/back)
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I'm trying to determine the best type (or if it makes a difference) to run through the crawl. Here are two i'm looking at. The biggest difference I can see is the price. The length (undetermined exactly right now) will be 15-25 feet of cable. The two below are 25 feet.

    http://www.trianglecables.com/25-foo...deo-cable.html

    or

    http://www.accessories4less.com/cgi-bin/item/SQ70425

    These are rated as "in-wall", but i'm not sure if they are much different than the above:
    http://www.av-outlet.com/en-us/dept_109.html

    Anyone have any opinions on this?
     
  2. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    I would use standard Quad shielded RG6U coax. You can get face plates with a screw on coax side & a RCA side. Run 5 strands per location so you can use the TVs audio in along with the video.
    I didn't check out the links but other stuff I looked at was much too pricy with out any real advantage.
     
  3. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    I'd pull enough wire to create an un-broken run of wire. You can always cut and add wall-plates later. Just make sure to run the wires through the standard electrical outlet box's.

    The "RCA" plug is really a BAD connector for video frequencies. The plain-old "F" connector like your CATV uses is actually superior for the signals. Professional video gear uses the same style connector as the "F" connector, but with a twist-lock called "BNC".

    Also note: many states/cities have fire-codes that want "CL3" or In-Wall rated cables if you run through walls or under floors. These have a fire-resistant instulator that wont act like a fuse to help a fire spread faster.

    If it was my install, I'd go with the $91 cable from BlueJeansCables. This is what the broadcast industry uses going from studio to studio. The labor to install a new cable will swamp the cost of the cable so you may as well go with 'good stuff' from the start.

    One of the cables you mention features something called "extended 1 Ghz bandwidth" - which is kind of meaningless. What you want is a cable made with coax that has a -3db point about 4 times your max analog frequency. This means good HD Video coax has a -3db point about 100-120 Mhz. (Like the Belden and Canare coax) Most of the time talking about Ghz frequencies - they are describing DIGITAL signals, not analog. This makes me somewhat suspicious about the analog performance of those cables.

    Also - you might want to run a SVideo cable along with that component cable as some sources do not support component.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, those are some good tips. The last site I listed has an in-wall rated cable with the option to put bnc on both ends. However, i've not found a wallplate with bnc connectors yet. Also, I did plan on running an s-video as well. I'll actually have 2 component (dvd,hdtv) and 1 s-video (receiver) built into this wallplate.

    I've found cables with both bnc-bnc and bnc-rca, but have not found a wallplate yet that has bnc-bnc on both sides. The only one i've found so far has bnc on one side and solder on the other.

    Anyone have a link to a place that has a componet wall plate with bnc pass through on it?
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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  7. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks! Does it matter if they are gold plated or not? I didn't see that option at cableorganizer.com. I also didn't see an option to color code them.

    I found them here:
    http://www.ramelectronics.net/html/keystone.html#bnc

    color coded, but they are twice as much.
     
  8. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    I like the idea of RG6. For the lengths you're using it is overkill but the price differential isn't all that bad. I'd run a bit more than you need so that if for some reason you need to remake the connections you've got the wire already. I also second Bob's thoughts on the type of connectors. The gold plating will provide some additional corrosion resistance and the color coding is a nice touch. A little more expensive but hey, the overall difference is less than the cost of a snack and a cup of coffee at Starbucks.
     
  9. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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  10. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    What you ought to be looking for are coax cables whose center conductor is made of 100% copper. I think most coax cables that talk about CATV are actually copper over steel. Now, that's fine for the purpose but that's because the cable itself is actually being used to pass signals that are about 50 mHz and greater. The frequencies for your DVD player are much lower and in that case, the all copper construction is a superior solution. I'd double check with an email or phone call to make sure of what you're getting. As to how you want to the cable terminated, that's going to depend upon the wall plates and jacks you choose. Make sense?
     
  11. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    Yes, that all makes sense.

    Upon doing more research, I see that there are duel shield and quad shield cables. What would be the more appropriate? The only quad shield cable I found was sold by the foot and I would have to put the BNC connectors on myself, and I don't have the tools for that.

    Here is the quad shield cabling:
    http://www.hometech.com/techwire/coax.html#BE-7916A

    Looks like i'd be able to buy quite a bit of wire at a fraction of the cost and crimp them myself.
     
  12. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    This dual vs. quad, and for that matter, even triple shielded, comes up from time to time with no easy answer. The shielding, and you need to have some, is designed to deal with RFI/EMI over specific frequency ranges. More doesn't necessarily mean more effective as Blue Jeans Cable, a forum sponsor and pretty nice guys, notes on their website. With all the many brands and types within a particular brand, it's fairly confusing to make a selection. There's always going to be this unsuredness because of this.

    The needs of a homeowner, in your case the desire to run 3 coax cables (all copper!) through the wall, can be simplified to a great degree by buying a bundle where all three coaxes are encased and pulled simultaneously. Belden (1-800-BELDEN-4) offers such products I believe under their Brilliance line. Probably Canare and Liberty as well as others do too. It's a toll-free number Chuck and if you're fortunate to ask for and get a Mr. Steve Lampen, you'll find that all your questions and more will be answered in an intelligent and forthright manner.
     
  13. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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  14. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Yes Chuck. I don't think those are RG6 and all copper though. When they're bundled like that, IMO it makes it easier and more elegant to run the pull through the studs and besides, now you don't have to agonize if the lengths are the same, give or take a couple of inches. If all you're going to use this cable for is running the DVD to the display and let's say your distances are around 50 feet or so, it won't make a hill of beans difference if you're running RG59 or RG6. I don't know what the attenuation losses are for the mini coax that you linked to but Belden ought to have that info somewhere. Hang in there, you're getting it!
     
  15. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    Slowly...but surely!

    My inwall length will only be 18-20'. I'll try to find the appropriate bundled cable. Any recommendations? Here is a belden that is 100% copper (at least I think that is what the spec said):

    http://www.hometech.com/techwire/coax.html#BE-7787A
     
  16. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Not really Chuck. I'd tend to stick with a brand name and whether that brand name was Belden, Canare, Mogami, Liberty, or something else, it wouldn't matter much to me. The specs on these cables bounce around a bit and for your purposes it doesn't matter much at all. It's like saying is it easier to park in a 50 foot spot or a 55 foot spot. Either way it's more than you'll ever need. The reason I suggest some of the brand names is because if I wanted to, I could find an applications person who'd guide me and maybe answer questions I hadn't thought of asking. That's why I urged you to contact Belden and gave you Lampen's name. Assuming he still works there, he's one of the good guys.

    Offhand though, it seems to me the link you provided is a good choice. You might want to either do a search or maybe make a separate post to see what people's experience with this particular cable has been with regards to putting connectors on. It's been a while for me and I'm just not up on it. Maybe the DIY forum. Maybe ask Belden. You'll get it!
     
  17. Shannon W

    Shannon W Stunt Coordinator

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    Where can I fine the Wall plate that has the BNC Connector "Female" on one end and the RCA connector on the other? Thanks! Shannon
     
  18. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    I haven't seen any of those on the sites i've been to, but that doesn't mean they are not out there. I thought about doing that at first, but then decided I wanted a stronger connection and went with the BNC-BNC jack, and bought cables with RCA-BNC ends.
     
  19. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    You might try places like PartsExpress or even CableOrganizer. If you get lost on their sites, just call them.
     

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