Rudolph on CBS: No sponsor again

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Jo_C, Dec 2, 2004.

  1. Jo_C

    Jo_C Second Unit

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    For those of you who saw "Rudolph" on CBS last night, you may have figured out the 40th anniversary broadcast had no sponsor.

    That is the problem with these kinds of classic shows on network television nowadays, that it is hard to find a sponsor when there is lack of interest in these kinds of shows.

    So, as a result, IMHO, in order to offset the lost sponsor revenue, CBS had to give free advertising time to fill the commercial breaks to "the usual suspects". Those suspects generally are McDonalds, General Mills, and a major movie studio (in this case, it was Paramount for its upcoming release "...Unfortunate Events").

    CBS is losing money when it airs shows like Rudolph without a main sponsor. Of course, had FOX aired it instead, it most certainly would have found a sponsor.

    CBS might as well have given up advertising time to the Ad Council (for PSAs) rather than go through the agony of finding sponsors.
     
  2. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    Just how, precisely, does giving away advertising time offset having no "sponsor"? Wouldn't that just exacerbate the situation?

    I imagine the only free time among those might be Paramount, what with it being a corporate sibling, but even those pay for their ads.
     
  3. Jo_C

    Jo_C Second Unit

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    If you remember, NBC lost money on its coverage of the Seoul Olympics in 1988, as a result, it had to give free advertising time during its shows in the weeks that followed.

    Any program that loses money for a network results in giving away its ad time.

    On the other hand, if you may have also noticed, all of ABC's daytime soap operas are now sponsored.
     
  4. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    Except, of course, Rudolph appeared to do pretty well last night, scoring a solid second place for its time slot. It's unlikely CBS is doling out make-good slots for that, especially since the promised ratings for a forty-year-old kids' holiday special are probably fairly low.

    Actually, as I understand it, any show that receive ratings below the level the network promised the ad buyer results in the network either refunding some of the advertising dollars or (more often) giving the advertiser free "make-good" ad slots during a later program. But I'm sure someone actually in the television business can correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  5. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    Jason, I believe you are correct about the ads vs ratings thing...and you stole my post!
     
  6. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    I don't think this is anything new. I know Proctor and Gamble have sponsored soaps for YEARS; I think the term "soap opera" was coined because the soap manufacturers were the sponsors of soaps all the way back to the days of radio.
     
  7. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    Sponsor, nothing - P&G outright owns As the World Turns and Guiding Light. Soaps came by their name honestly.
     
  8. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    If CBS were losing money on the broacast, they wouldn't run it in the first place.

    Weep not for the Tiffany Network.

    And if they are losing audience, it's because they run the thing too damn early. I used to watch it every year when it was run in mid-December. I have no interest in Christmas programming on Thanksgiving, or the first week of December, and haven't watched it in years.
     
  9. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    Heck, now that these specials are on DVD, I just watch the DVDs.
     
  10. Peter McM

    Peter McM Supporting Actor

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    The thing was edited, to boot![​IMG]

    It runs 55 minutes complete, and there was definitely more than five minutes devoted to commercials. If CBS is giving away ad space, why not give away less and air the whole show?[​IMG]

    I agree about the networks running some of the classics too early, but they probably want to save the strong, in-the-mood audiences for the latest flash-in-the-pan music special, like Jessica and whatshisname.

    Bob Hope, we miss you sir...[​IMG]
     
  11. Jonathan Carter

    Jonathan Carter Supporting Actor

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    Exactly, stuff like this needs to be run the week or 12 days before Christmas, the 1st of Dec. or earlier. I'm getting tired of seeing shit like tree lots, lights on houses, and shopping centers and stores being decorated for Christmas before Thanksging is even here and the way they are doing the TV programming is just making it worse.

    Besides, it's not officially the Christmas season until I've seen the Charlie Brown Christmas special. [​IMG]
     
  12. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    No reason, therefore, to watch the broadcast if the broadcast is edited and the DVD is not.
     
  13. Scott_J

    Scott_J Cinematographer

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    A discussion of Rudolph actually came up at my office today, surprisingly (after my VP mentioned watching it the other day).

    One of my co-workers brought up a couple points, and I immediately thought of posting them to this thread as reasons why people don't watch it anymore: because of scientific inaccuracies in the show.- The show depicts trees and sunlight at the North Pole, even though there are no trees there and no sunlight this time of year.

    Who can watch it knowing those glaring inaccuracies? [​IMG] He was just kidding of course (although that stuff is inaccurate).
     
  14. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    Highest rating the show (Rudolph) has had in a decade, according to the Nielsons. Not bad.

    Every time I see it, I think of the MadTV sketch in which abominable takes out Santa, etc. as part of a mass-takeover.
     

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