RS SPLM Correction Factor w/ 1 Hz intervals

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by JasonCI, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. JasonCI

    JasonCI Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello,

    All of the Radio Shack correction factors I've seen on the WWW are available at 1/6th octave intervals. What about the correction factors in 1 Hz increments? Most suggest interpolating, but the curve is exponential, not linear. Does anyone know how to calculate them?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Ilkka R

    Ilkka R Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 19, 2004
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    0
    HzCorrection
    1020
    1216.5
    1413.77497731
    1611.5
    189.287087811
    207.5
    226.123724357
    245
    264.400558684
    283.872983346
    303.408658099
    323
    342.866328377
    362.738612788
    382.616587848
    402.5
    422.257201129
    442.037982774
    461.840054807
    481.661349515
    501.5
    521.5
    541.5
    561.5
    581.5
    601.5
    621.5
    641.5
    661.5
    681.5
    701.5
    721.5
    741.5
    761.5
    781.5
    801.5
    821.543779013
    841.588835762
    861.635207536
    881.682932718
    901.732050808
    921.782602458
    941.834629509
    961.888175023
    981.943283316
    1002

    I had these ready, but they are only w/ 2Hz intervals. I can make 1Hz version for you. These are made with Excel's exponential interpolation. They are quite accurate.
     
  3. JasonCI

    JasonCI Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Ilkka,

    If you wouldn't mind I would like the correction factors in 1 Hz increments. I've been trying to forecat them myself but I haven't had any luck.

    Jason
     
  4. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you start with the original correction factors, and then compare linear interpolation vs logarhythmic for 1 Hz increments, it isn't that much different.

    A lot of people actually make small adjustments to the original set to smooth what appears to be abrupt changes in the original factors anyway. Again, the differences just are not that large when you compare to a typical in-room response curve.
     

Share This Page