RPTVs and video games

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason Lovely, Feb 18, 2002.

  1. Jason Lovely

    Jason Lovely Stunt Coordinator

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    Has anyone had a problem with screen burn-in when playing video games on an RPTV? I'm looking for a RP HDTV, and I've read that this is a big problem.
     
  2. Mark_HD

    Mark_HD Extra

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    ... i'll second this question. i just bought a RP HDTV and am using XBOX w/ it.

    i'm being very careful not to pause the image on the screen, but are there issues that can occur just because your using the video game through the projection tv?

    i've got another option. i can switch the game box over to my XBR tv, however, XBOX uses both native 16:9 and 480 progressive scan technology in it's games and will eventually publish games in HD ... it is awsome.

    lookin for input too.

    Jason ... thanks for initiating this question ...
     
  3. Jason Lovely

    Jason Lovely Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm also pretty excited about playing games in widescreen format. What worries me the most are things like health bars and statistics that stay on the screen the entire time; maybe these types of things can get burned in the screen even if the game isn't paused. I've heard things on channels like CNN can get burned in also.
     
  4. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Keep your set's contrast (picture) down to avoid/reduce the chances of phosphor burn. On my Sony HS10, I have the contrast set to about 33% of the maximum, which I consider to be the HIGHEST setting I'll ever use. Anything more than that, and Im overdriving the tubes.

    Anything STATIC (i.e. not moving) on your screen can potentially cause uneven phosphor burn, so be careful with games that have lots of dials/text/windows/gauges whatever, and also be careful with any TV station that plasters logs/banners everywhere such as CNN....

    -Ryan Dinan
     
  5. Sean Moon

    Sean Moon Cinematographer

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    Xbox and Dreamcast, and even Gamecube I think, have an auto screen saver if it is left idle for too long. The screen dims and then after a while little lights will appear and start moving over the screen.

    I asked this same question at a AV place and he said as long as I vary the content of what I watch or play, there is no problem. In other words, If I play an hour of Dead or Alive 3 every day, and nothing else...I am screwed. But if I mix it up with what I play and watch, such as movies and whatnot, it is fine.
     
  6. Jeff_Hunt

    Jeff_Hunt Stunt Coordinator

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    Everything I've read and heard suggests what we've heard here. Keep the contrast low, NEVER pause the game with the TV on, and don't play the same game for long periods of time.

    All of this only reduces your chances of burn-in, but it does pretty well from all accounts I hear.
     
  7. Jerry Gracia

    Jerry Gracia Supporting Actor

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    I've been playing video games on my RPTV for over 3 years now, no problems at all. My TV is calibrated with AVIA.

    Basically, do what has been suggested already...keep the contrast LOW and do not leave a game paused for extended period of times.

    The reason there's a lot of concern with burn-in using video games on RPTVs is because a RPTV with a very high contrast setting is very susceptible to burn-in, and many people out there don't have a clue when it comes to proper settings on a television.
     

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