RPTV questions

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Robert Lovejoy, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. Robert Lovejoy

    Robert Lovejoy Stunt Coordinator

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    It's getting to be time for me to think about a new TV to replace my venerable Toshiba 31 inch CRT. It seems that RPTVs have the best bang for the buck these days in terms of 16:9 HD compatible sets, but I'm curious as to their drawbacks. How frequently do projection lamps need replacement, and is that a costly process?

    Most sets I've seen also have fairly hefty audio systems, which I don't need as I have a fine audio system. Can anyone recommend a good model that concentrates on the picture?

    I'm looking in the $1500-2000 bracket but would be willing to go higher for sufficient return on that investment. Size of the screen is secondary to PQ.

    It's amazing that so many retail chains seem clueless about what they sell (and set up their products so poorly as well!). Thanks for any input that may help me make this decision.
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Robert,

    The only rptvs with projection lamps are the dlp, lcd, and lcos models, none of which can be had in your price range.

    There are many excellent crt based rptvs in the sub-$2000 range, however. These use 3 crts (red, green, blue) to produce the picture. Calibrated properly (as in turned down from factory "torch" mode) these can last 8 or 10 years or so.

    Costco has a 64" Pioneer model on sale right now for $2000ish, this set has among the best line doublers and stretch modes in the industry, is renowned for excellent picture quality, but lacks DVI connections so you must use component for HD and DVD. This would be the best bang for the buck in my opinion.

    If that's not an option there are many models of Sony, Panasonic, Samsung, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, and Hitachi in the 51" or less range available for under $2000, none of which are burdened with particularly elaborate or expensive built in sound systems.
     
  3. Robert Lovejoy

    Robert Lovejoy Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Steve,
    Now I'm learning about DLP sets. Makes me want to hold off and save up some more! Seems like $3K is the point where the sets get interesting.
    Looked at the local Best Buy again and am confounded as to how all the sets are not set up optimally. One really needs the advice of videophiles such as those who frequent this forum in order to make an intelligent choice.
    Thanks for the info!
    Bob
    (Happily pushing my SVS!)
     
  4. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    Steve,

    How is DVI different from Component? Sorry to be off topic.
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    DVI is a direct digital connection, so the video info can stay in the digital domain to the display. This really only helps with digital displays, so the picture stays that way the whole time. With a CRT-based RPTV, component is just fine, as using DVI only shifts the D-A conversion into the set, since CRTs are by their nature analog devices.
     
  6. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    The Samsung dvd player that upconverts to 1080i will only do so via it's DVI connection, not component. I don't know what kind of digital artifacts are added by this conversion so don't know how this looks vs native 480p.

    I use a Faroudja chip progressive scan player feeding 480p to my set and it's displayed natively by the set (doesn't convert 480p to 540p like some makes). I've watched the same movie at 480p from dvd and at 1080i on HBO-HD and seen little difference in picture quality. Whether the 480p to 1080i conversion done by a relatively inexpensive player would look as good as HBO-HD is doubtful.
     

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