RPTV Questions...please help!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gary Tjia, Aug 12, 2002.

  1. Gary Tjia

    Gary Tjia Stunt Coordinator

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    I am looking at 50-53" widescreen HD RPTV (Mits, Toshiba, Hitachi, or Sony). Since my viewing distance is about 6-7 feet, I was told anything bigger than 53" is not recommended. Do you agree?

    I had read in this forum that some new HD RPTV has such good line doublers that a progressive scan DVD players will not be needed. However, a friend told me that progressive scan players will gain advantage when displaying fast moving pictures. Is that true?

    If not, which 16x9 HD RPTVs would you say have better line doublers?

    Also, the new Sony offers memory stick slots. Won't still digital camera pictures run the risk of burn-in on the RPTV?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Mike I

    Mike I Supporting Actor

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    There are many HD sets out there with great line doublers and will give you a great picture from your interlaced DVD player, however a progressive player will still give you a better picture than any sets internal line doubler....
    With a progressive scan dvd player the 3.2 pulldown is accomplished in the digital domain using the frame flags encoded in the dvd's mpeg bitstream..
    Advantages of progressive conversion
    Line doublers are used in other high-end home entertainment systems to provide progressive scanning. These may be stand-alone devices or incorporated into a digital TV. Impressive as they may be, DVD in-player progressive conversion has three big advantages over line doublers:
    1) High precision and stability
    A DVD-Video disc mastered from a film holds all the data necessary to produce an accurate progressive image, whereas an external line doubler must take hints from the video source to determine the source material and frame allocation.
    2) All-digital conversion minimizes signal degradation
    Since the signal from the DVD-Video disc is digital, progressive conversion can be performed digitally inside the player. Signal quality is protected until it leaves the player's analog output. In contrast, a stand-alone or in-TV doubler first receives information from the analog output of the source device then converts this analog signal back to digital for processing. Finally, it must translate the signal back to analog before outputting it. All this back-and-forth translation is much more likely to degrade the signal.
    3) Processing is optimized to DVD-Video's high image quality
    Line doublers built into digital TV sets are designed to work with a variety of video sources, so their settings are not necessarily ideal for DVD-Video. Progressive conversion is optimized for the high resolution and low noise of the DVD-Video format. This enables the unit to preserve DVD-Video picture quality for display on all screen sizes, from direct-view CRT to projectors.
     
  3. Gary Tjia

    Gary Tjia Stunt Coordinator

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    Mike,
    Thanks for the feedback. Does this mean that the progressive scan should always be left on for the DVD player and it would override the TV internal line doubler when watching a DVD?
    Could someone also comment on the memory stick feature in the new Sonys. Would you recommend using RPTV to display still digital camera pictures?
    Thanks[​IMG]
     
  4. Mike I

    Mike I Supporting Actor

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    Yes that would be correct..Leave the DVD player in it's progressive mode, the set's internal line doubler is by passed...
     

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