RPCRT vs. DLP/Plamsa/LCD

Discussion in 'Displays' started by SamRaymond, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. SamRaymond

    SamRaymond Auditioning

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    I am trying to decide which to buy? I have seen pics of "spidering" on LCD's, burn in and fade on plasma, and the whole bulb issue (lasting 500 hrs. instead of adv. 8k)and the fact that there are a gazillion mirrors that are hinged plus the color wheel (awful lot of moving parts if you ask me). For the price and picture quality am I better off getting a rpcrt that has known reliability? Thanks
     
  2. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    Welcome to the forum bro! The truth is nobody can answer that question for you. There are a bunch of tradeoffs, some of which you mentioned. The best we can do here is tell you about the tradeoffs so that you can make an informed decision.

    The issues that usually decide for people are price, space and lighting. You know about price. The CRT RP sets are bigger. If you have the room, not an issue. If you don't, the decision is made for you.

    Lighting is important because the CRT RP sets don't throw off as much light as the dlp, lcd or plasma sets, especially when they are calibrated correctly (the displays in the store are usually set WAY too bright to help sell them). This makes a difference because in a brightly lit room the picture on a CRT RP won't be as visible and will show glare and reflections, even from floor or table lamps. I have mine in a basement where I can control the light, so it was a great purchase for me. Depending on your needs, it may or may not be. When my wife joins me and decides to read while I am watching and needs the light on, it definitely compromises the picture. But I get the pleasure of her company. See, I told you it was all about tradeoffs!
     
  3. John S

    John S Producer

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    I think so.. Reguardless of anything else, I still feel CRT RP maybe the best of all RP technologies as far as PQ alone is considered. Plus, they are cheap these days to boot.



    Best of luck with your new display choice.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    CRT is the best of display technologies period. After all this time and after all this exciting new stuff, CRT still reigns supreme. Among the new technologies, however, I lean toward DLP. I will never be sold on plasma panels, and have only a light regard for LCD.
     
  5. Mort Corey

    Mort Corey Supporting Actor

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    Just remember that RPCRT units go out of adjustment just like anything else. Definately the best bang for the buck today....if you have the room and secondly, lighting control.

    Mort
     
  6. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Adding a bit to the discussion here, CRT-RPTV unfortunately is going through a phase out. Why my guess is the new tech that does 1080p. DLP does 1080p, not sure about LCD and CRT can only do 1080i. It's my understanding that LCD, Plasma and DLP are fixed pixel displays hence the ability to do 1080p. CRT I think give you the best picture overall. I mentioned in another post that I noticed that Sony website no longer display any CRT based RPTVs and I'm starting to notice that the big Sony CRTs are dropping in price. DLPs is still pretty much new technology, I think about 2 years old and LCD has been around for a while but not long in RPTV.

    Some differences from a neophite like myself I've read about is DLP has a potential rainbow effect issue, and correct me if I'm wrong experts, LCD may have burn in issues. CRT have the same burn in issues like LCD but depending on how you handle both types of sets, you can minimize the risks.
     
  7. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    DLP does have produce a rainbow effect to some people. Before you buy one, just look at one in a store for awhile and make sure it doesn't affect you (or anyone in your household that will be watching the tv a lot).

    LCD doesn't suffer burn in, plasma does. LCD is prone to the screen door effect, so make sure when you shop that you view the screen from the same distance you will see it when you have it in your home.

    You can minimize burn in by calibrating your tv correctly (turning brightness and sharpness down) and by not leaving it for extended periods of time on fixed/paused images, channels with tickers or corner logos, video games or watching letter boxed or pillared programming.
     
  8. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    Thanks for the information Charlie, I'm that much smarter and I can respond a bit better[​IMG]
     
  9. PeterK

    PeterK Supporting Actor

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    CRT's are good. My friend has an LCD similar size to mine and his is definately not twice the price as good [​IMG]
    Be prepared to do often convergences though. especially if you have unshielded speakers or a sub anywhere near the display *blush*
     
  10. Nils Luehrmann

    Nils Luehrmann Producer

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    Just so there isn't any misunderstanding, DLP has actually been around for some time now and has gone through many generations of development. DMD technology, which is what DLP is based on, was developed twenty years ago. By 1994 TI had working prototypes for DLP projectors and shipped their first product in 1996. As of 2004, more than 5 million DLP displays have been sold.

    The first DLP projector I owned was a 1999 Proxima DS1 (800x600, 2x3s color wheel, 250:1 contrast, 600 lumens) and cost +$6,000... DLP has come a long way since then. [​IMG]

    As for assessing the different technologies, and how it might effect your choice, I'd only be repeating similar advice that Charlie already offered. I will say though, that not all CRT's are alike, and there are several inferior CRT RPTVs that wont ever look as good as some of the more recent FPD displays - even in the best viewing conditions. Some of the serious flaws with inferior CRTs are:
    • Inability to hold convergence
    • Poorly design screens that magnify the scan lines
    • Bad interpolators and scalers, which add visual artifacts to the image
    • Inferior shielding from magnetic interference
    • etc
    While it is true, that for the most part, the best CRT's (EM focus CRT's with 9" tubes) can with proper calibration and care, produce the best over-all PQ, the same can not be said about many of the junk CRT projectors that eventually find their way into our local land fills. [​IMG]

    Another issue you may want to consider is being able to display HD material in its native resolution. If so you should really only consider displays that have a resolution of 1280x720 or greater. Also, be sure it has either an HDMI input, or a DVI-HDCP input, otherwise there is a very good chance that in the future, you will not be able to receive any full-rez HD signals. At least not without using a third party adapter.
     

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