RP dilima

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Darrin_R, Dec 27, 2001.

  1. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Could someone make a recommendation for a good RP TV. And the brands to stay away from. It seems that when I view the sets in the store, some of the cheaper brands have a better picture (that cant be right). I am just confusioning myself which makes it hard to make a decision. My budget is $2500 to $3000.

    Thanks
     
  2. Richard Burzynski

    Richard Burzynski Second Unit

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    Darrin:

    I'll try to help. Just a few questions:

    (1) Primary Usage?

    Is this set going into a dedicated Home Theater Room? Meaning mainly for DVD watching and that's all? Or is it going into a family/living room? If Family room, what will you MAINLY watch? Cable, Satellite, VCR, DVD's?

    (2) What size would you like to get for your budgeted $?

    (3) Please tell us what brands you have seen and what looked good/bad to your eyes so far?

    Answer these and we'll go from there.

    Rich B.
     
  3. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Darrin,
    Having gone through this recently, I can share some general observations:
    Toshiba--Very popular around here, good bang for the buck. Needs a medium bit of tweaking for best picture. Good overall for ntsc viewing--decent line doubling and good stretch modes.
    Mitsubishi--Very good for dvd and HD, not as good for ntsc as many other brands. Needs lots of tweaking for best performance but once tweaked is considered quite good.
    Pioneer--the Elites are considered about the best rptvs out there for under $10k, but they are expensive (4500 list for a 53"). There is a less expensive line of Pioneers, still pricey though at $3500 for a 53". I've never seen an Elite, but the lower priced line did not impress me as being much if any better than a Toshiba costing much less. Pioneer has good quality control and their sets look pretty good out of the box.
    Hitachi--thier new line of widescreen sets is problematic--lots of quality control issues, somewhat pricey. Quite a few tweaks necessary, but not tweaker friendly. Had one for 2 weeks and gave up, swapped for:
    Sony--Their new HW40 line is quite nice at a couple of hundred more than a Tosh.
    Good quality control, and generally very nice out of the box. My KP57HW40 does a nice job with ntsc, and looks extremely nice for HD and DVD. Has good stretch modes. Does not require a lot of tweaking to get a very nice picture--an AVIA calibration with just the user controls will yield nice results. Has an easily accessible and comprehensive service menu for those who just have to experiment.
    Overall, for a widescreen HD ready model that does ntsc decently at a less than stratospheric price I like Sony and Toshiba, in that order, though you won't go wrong with either make.
     
  4. Juan_R

    Juan_R Supporting Actor

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    Steve,

    You should save that reply, it was very imformative and I am sure that it will need to be used again.
     
  5. Darrin_R

    Darrin_R Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for replying.

    I will be using the TV for DVD and Satellite (lots of sports). I think I would like 50" or larger but of course quality comes first.

    So far I like the Sony, Hitachi, and Toshiba but I was not aware that the Hitachi had problems. I also like the Elite but the wife doesnt like the price tag.
     
  6. Chris Llana

    Chris Llana Auditioning

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    The current issue of Sound & Vision magazine contains a review of three 50-53" RPTVs --- Pioneer, Toshiba, & Hitachi.

    Also, check hometheaterspot.com for individual forums for each brand of HDTV, where owners/fans chronicle triumphs and tribulations, tweaks and recommendations.
     
  7. Richard Burzynski

    Richard Burzynski Second Unit

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    Darrin:

    You need to choose between an HD set and an analog set. Since you will mainy watch DVD's and Satellite (Sports) I think an HD set may be good for you.

    Most HD sets are widescreen (16:9). These sets are great for DVD watching as 99.9% of DVD's are widescreen. Make sure you get a Progressive DVD player if you get an HD set. Since you already have / or plan to get satellite, your transition to HD will be easier. Satellite gives you good options for getting HD material into your home, but you will have to maybe uprgade or add another dish on the roof plus get an HD box that will run you another $600+. You should also look into getting an old-school roof-top antenna (if you're close enough to transmitters) to get the free OTA (over the air) HD channels. As for what HD sets you should consider, I say listen to Steve's advice, it's on the money.

    Now, if you do not plan on upgrading your Sat service to include HD material, you may want to reconsider getting an HD set. If you will still mainly watch DVD's (more than half the time) then still consider an HD set. But if you will watch regular (analog) Sat service all week long, and maybe a DVD or 2 on the weekend, then I would strongly consider a good analog set. Mitsubishi or Sony - only analog RPTV's that still have a 3DYC filter.

    Good Luck.

    Rich B.
     
  8. Bill_M

    Bill_M Agent

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    If a 46" 16x9 is big enough, check out the RCA 52" HD 4x3 set- d52120 and d52130. Squeezes to 16x9 on demand on any source and auto converges (two great features) with a line doubler also. You can get one of these and an HD STB (DTC-100 for example) for about $2500 or less.
     
  9. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Some irritating problems some models have:
    1. Locked into 16:9 mode on some inputs, notably the progressive scan. Your 4:3 shows will always be stretched.
    2. Is 4:3 and when in 16:9 mode uses only 810 scan lines instead of 1080.
    3. Inability to save the convergence, geometry, overscan, etc. tweaks for the different modes: 480p, HDTV, 16:9, 4:3, etc.
    4. Channel selector slow to respond.
    Other video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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