Roy Rogers in TruColor and Uncut

bujaki

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The photo of "Lady of Burlesque" (1943-UA) tells me that Stephanie Bachelor's career wasn't 'entirely' restricted to Republic (like I thought). But mostly so. I don't think there are too many B-players whose leading man/lady roles were 100% exclusive to a single studio, but there are a few, and a few others come close. Jinx Falkenburg at Columbia comes to mind. Did Linda Stirling ever do any films outside Republic, other than a few bit parts? I think Eleanor Whitney, who starred in a number of breezy B-musical-comedies at Paramount in the 1930s, never strayed from her home studio. I also associate Louise Campbell with Paramount, although she might have eventually gravitated to poverty-row. Did Sydney Fox ever have a leading-lady role outside of Universal? Not sure, but I can't think of one.

On the flip side of the coin, what about B-stars who might have managed to star in at least one film at just about EVERY studio? The closest leading-lady I can think of is Jean Parker. She was with MGM at first, culminating in things like "Sequoia" (1934), before eventually fleeing from Louis Mayer's greasy clutches. During that time, she did some RKO's, like the neat rural melodrama "Two Alone" (1934) and the Fred Stone comedy "Farmer in the Dell" (1936), the latter film strangely absent from TCM, even though I saw it on TNT thirty years ago. At Paramount, Parker was leading-lady to George Raft in "Limehouse Blues" (1934) and to Fred MacMurray in "The Texas Rangers" (1936). She starred in "Life Begins with Love" (1937) for Columbia. Lots of Republics, twice opposite Phil Regan in 1939, and later headlining "The Girl from Alaska" (1942). Many Monogrammers too, from "Romance of the Limberlost" (1938) to those two Kitty O'Day comedy-mysteries in the mid-1940s. Parker also made tons of those Pine-Thomas titles at Paramount... "Wrecking Crew" (1942), "Alaska Highway" (1943), etc. She was probably their most prolific leading-lady. Parker was also in PRC's "Bluebeard" (1944). Not much over at Fox, although she was in "Caravan" (1934), that odd but enjoyable gypsy-musical confection, and (if I recall correctly), she wound up winning the leading-man, Charles Boyer, over the main star, Loretta Young. The only studio I don't think Parker worked under is Warner Bros.

As for B-level leading men who seemed to work at every studio, I think William Gargan must be in the top spot, or near it. Early on, he headlined RKO's "Headline Shooter" (1933), and was also lead in a few Columbia's like "The Line-Up" (1934), which I've always wanted to see, and "Alibi For Murder" (1936), the latter available thru Sony Archives. At Warners, Gargan was lead in several of their minor, mid-1930s B's, like the funny "A Night at the Ritz" (1935), which I always liked. He starred in the early Republic "Navy Born" (1936), a common pd title. He did a few scattered Paramounts, like the loopy comedy-mystery "She Asked for It" (1937). Gargan starred in a ton of Universal B's, from "Reported Missing" (1936) to "The House of Fear" (1939) and "Song of the Sarong" (1945). Didn't do too much at MGM, but he was one of the title characters in their "Joe and Ethel Turp Call on the President" (1939), which I haven't seen in eons. At Columbia again, he took over the Ellery Queen role from Ralph Bellamy in that early-1940s series of films. Like Jean Parker, he was in a slew of those Pine-Thomas films at Paramount, like "Midnight Manhunt" (1945) and "Dynamite" (1949), and such. He even finally made it to Fox studios for "Behind Green Lights" (1946), and producer Sol Wurtzel's "Rendezvous 24" (1946). Never seen those. I think Gargan covered just about every base, other than dipping down to Monogram and PRC (that I know of).

Hmm, anyone think of any other B-stars that managed to work at just about every studio, more than either Jean Parker or William Gargan? I thought maybe Edward Norris, but although he zipped around just about as much, he was often limited to 'second leads' and down-the-cast roles.
Joe and Ethel Turp is not available due to legal entanglements.
 

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Joe and Ethel Turp is not available due to legal entanglements.
It must be like MGM's "Trial of Mary Dugan" (1929). That one also used to be run, but somehow got withdrawn from circulation, apparently due to rights issues.

But I wonder what's the deal with "Farmer in the Dell" (1936-RKO)? Although a minor little b-comedy, I'd rather like to see it again. I think RKO was briefly trying to mold Fred Stone (who actually went way, way back) into a kind of Will Rogers type. Sort of how Fox tried with Irving S. Cobb around the same time. I always liked Fred's daughter, Paula Stone, who appeared in a few b-films, like one of those Dick Foran westerns at Warners. I remember she rode in on horseback in one scene, and the horse reared up to a rather stark degree, and I don't think she batted an eye.
 

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SUNSET IN ELDORADO-1945, B&W, 66 minutes.
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Another one that's believed to be only available in the 53 minute edited for TV version.

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I have the Republic Home Video 53 minute VHS that was released in the 1990s. It's an excellent clear print. It has a newer color Republic Home Video eagle logo, plus the period eagle logo at the start. New logo at the end. It has a syndicated title card and a generic THE END that blocks the view of Roy and Dale singing the final song., which is still heard.

The VHS box and the lettering printed on the cassette have the original run time of 66 minutes listed, but, again, it's the 53 minute version. I wonder if RHV actually had a full length print but somebody decided to send an edited print, to the copiers, because it looked better?

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In SUNSET IN EL DORADO, Dale is a travel agency lecturer who sells tours to others, but never goes anywhere.

On a whim, she joins a western bus tour that is departing from her office that day.

At first her aunt, Margaret Dumont, and her fiancé, Hardie Albright, think Dale was kidnapped, but soon realize she has just run off. They offer a reward and finally track her down, out west, and take her from the tour bus.

As they drive back, Dale sabotages their car and then they meet Roy.
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Roy and Trigger tow the car to a nearby ghost town, for shelter, and ride off to get a mechanic for the car.

Dale realizes that she is in the town where her grandmother was an entertainer in a gambling house and theater.

Dale runs into Gabby, who is kind of a caretaker to the place and was a friend of her grandmother.
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She dozes off and dreams about her showgirl grandmother.

In her dream Dale is her grandmother, Roy is Roy, Gabby is Gabby, her aunt is her aunt, and her fiancé runs the gambling house/theater. The fiancé is also after Gabby's gold mine.

Gabby, Dale, Hardie Albright, and Margaret Dumont.
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There is some action with a stagecoach hold-up, some shooting, and some fist fights.
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Roy gets to biff Roy Barcroft, as usual.
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But, mainly, SUNSET IN EL DORADO is a fun and pleasant Roy and Dale musical. Dale gets numerous costume changes and looks great as she sings and dances. There are dancing girls and dancing boys. The dancers have a bunch of costume changes, too. Since there are 13 minutes missing, some of that has been cut or shortened.

One of the ads for SUNSET IN EL DORADO mentions eight songs.
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There are five musical numbers still in place and the Bob Nolan site identifies two of the missing songs. A Dale number and a Pioneers number. The eighth missing song, I guess involved the dancers, with the cast.

As always, Gabby is a hoot!
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Dale and the missing number, "Be My Little Baby Bumble Bee". Catchy, I wonder?
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The missing Pioneer number, "Tain't No Use", with Dale?
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Edited version, YouTube.
 
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Bert Greene

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I'm curious if the 'cut' Sons of the Pioneers number of "Tain't No Use" is the same tune popularly recorded back in 1936. I mainly recall the Benny Goodman version, as if features Goodman himself doing the vocal, one of the only times he ever did so. He might be a genius on the clarinet, but he's a horrid singer (and critics of the day apparently felt that the name of the tune, "Tain't No Use," accurately applied to his attempt at vocalizing). Also recording it that year (1936) was jazz violinist Stuff Smith, who took it at a slower tempo, and had fairly decent results. Probably one of Smith's better Vocalion records from that period. Anyway, I suspect the tune was recorded by others, but these are the only two I'm aware of. Interesting if this is what the Sons of the Pioneers might have done in the film. Or, it could be a completely different tune with the same title. That's happened before as well.

Grumble. I hate that these Rogers films are so danged chopped-up!
 

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Bert, I think it's a completely different tune. The song is credited to Pioneer Ken Carson, as the writer, in Carson's bio, at the Bob Nolan site.

There's a ton of Ken Carson/Pioneers stuff on YouTube. But after a quick look I cain't find a Pioneers version, of 'Tain't No Use'.

Ken Carson top row, right.
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,RED RIVER VALLEY-1941, B&W, 62 minutes.
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Another Roy Rogers movie that's only around in the 53 minute version. I have the Sinister Cinema DVD-R. It's an O.K. darkish print. The print has a Hollywood Television Service logo, fore and aft, and a syndicated title card. Hollywood Television Service was the TV Division of Republic Pictures Studio. I still recommend the Sinister DVD-R, as RED RIVER VALLEY is an important point on the Roy Rogers movie trail.
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From this movie on to PALS OF THE GOLDEN WEST-1951, all Roy Rogers movies will be set in present times, instead of The Old West. Of the earlier 24 pictures in the Rogers movie series only two were set in the present, the first, UNDER WESTERN STARS-1938 and the ninth, WALL STREET COWBOY-1939. RED RIVER VALLEY also starts the 42 film run of Bob Nolan and The Sons of the Pioneers, in Roy's movies, which ends with NIGHT TIME IN NEVADA-1948.
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Gale Storm is Roy's love interest. Gale Storm appeared in two other Roy Rogers movies, JESSE JAMES AT BAY-1941 and MAN FROM CHEYENNE-1942.
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The story starts with Roy and Gale riding on horseback down a road. They mention they are on their way to a homecoming party for Roy. We cut to the party and The Pioneers, singing in progress to the end of a song. As the song ends we can see Roy and Gale dancing with large group of men an woman in old west clothing.
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So, the Rogers movie, debut song, of The Pioneers, "Sunset On The Trail", is missing about 4/5 of it's length, in the party scene. Probably missing a "Hiya, Roy" chat scene and the crowd dancing at the party, plus other character introductions.. All the songs listed at the Bob Nolan site for RED RIVER VALLEY are in it, but like "Sunset On The Trail", may be edited. We only hear two lines of a song called, "Chant Of The Wanderer".

Possible missing scene of the party with Trevor Bardette.
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Suddenly, we are outside of the local Water and Land Office, and there is an explosion!!! Men on horseback have blown the safe and escape. Roy and the townsmen grab their guns and horses and give chase. But, the bad guys switch from their horses to a waiting car and out run the town horses!!!!
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Roy fires, but it's too late.
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It's hard to tell, because of the cuts, but the robbers getting away by car may have been intended as a surprise to the audience, expecting an old west adventure.

Turns out Roy's party was also combined with a Pioneer and Founders Day celebration with everybody dressed up in old fashioned clothes and no cars in sight. And on top of that, it turns out that Roy and The Pioneers have a radio show.
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Roy has a ranch that Gabby runs for him. Gabby is a barber and also is the publisher of the local newspaper. In the same storefront, Gabby's daughter, Sally Payne, runs the local telephone exchange.

Roy doesn't dance with Sally, in the movie, but the way the scene plays out in the film, makes me think this is a staged still, not a missing scene.
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Now this lobby card might be a missing scene. Gale and Roy at a gas pump.
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Gale Storm's father, Robert Homans is the local Sheriff and also a big wig in a dam building enterprise between the town and the federal government.

Roy and the Pioneers with Robert Homans.
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Trevor Bardette and Hal Taliaferro want control of the dam. They use robbery, sabotage, and sneaky business practices to do that.

Taliaferro, two guards, and Bardette,
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Roy, Gabby, Sally, and The Pioneers try to get the goods on Bardette and Taliaferro.

To do that, "Family Values Roy" resorts to multiple counts of robbery, auto theft, assault with a deadly weapon, resisting arrest, attempted murder, reckless endangerment, criminal trespass, destruction of private property, kidnapping, making terroristic threats, jail breaking, witness intimidation, and arson. Roy and the gang even joke about their crime spree.

Stunt Roy leaping to stunt Trigger, from the stolen car, with the help of the stunt Pioneers.
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All's well that ends well and Roy is made the new Sheriff.
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In 1936, Gene Autry made a movie called RED RIVER VALLEY. It also dealt with a dam project. It's on the Shout/Timeless Gene Autry DVD Collection Vol. 3. For TV syndication, the title was changed to, MAN OF THE FRONTIER.
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RED RIVER VALLEY- edited version YouTube.
 
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Flashgear

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Glad to see you posting here again Bob! Another wonderful, funny and informative post as always!
To do that, "Family Values Roy" resorts to multiple counts of robbery, auto theft, assault with a deadly weapon, resisting arrest, attempted murder, reckless endangerment, criminal trespass, destruction of private property, kidnapping, making terroristic threats, and arson.
Another day at the office for our hero, ha, ha! I nearly did all of the above during a recent shopping trip to Costco, but I'm a villain at heart.

I really should try and chip-in with some more movie page ads from old newspapers, hopefully catching more Roy Rogers premiere openings in the good ol' days of yesteryear.

Seriously, welcome back, and from my bunker to yours, I wish you great health and happiness during our current global emergency. Same to everyone of our valuable members.
 

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With her, successful, movie, radio, record, and TV career, Gale Storm was probably the future biggest star to co-star in the Roy Rogers pictures.

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She made other westerns too.
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with veteran western star Raymond Hatton.
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THE TEXAS RANGERS-1951 is a great pulp western movie, with a fine cast of western character actors. It was out on VHS, way back, never on Disc in the U.S. It plays on TV all the time, but here's a blurry YouTube.
 

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The YouTube clip of, "It's My Lazy Day", in Post #470, is from the Gene Autry movie, "Riders Of The Whistling Pines"-1949.

"Riders Of The Whistling Pines", is the answer to the trivia question.."What Gene Autry movie did Marilyn Monroe appear in?"
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She does not act in the movie, but her photograph is shown in a number of scenes. Her photo is used to portray the late wife of a troubled character, the drinking man following along with Gene, in the video clip.
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Marilyn headed west with cheesecake calendar art and pictures.
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And movies like "Ticket To Tomahawk"-1950.
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"River Of No Return"-1954.
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With her stunt double, Helen Thurston.
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Helen Thurston doubled Frances Gifford in, the Republic serial, "Jungle Girl"-1941.
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Clayton Moore is also in "Riders Of The Whistling Pines", as a henchman. This may be a movie Moore did before starting "The Lone Ranger" TV series. Or, it may be a movie he did after he completed his first batch of 'Lone Ranger" episodes, which I think began filming in 1948.

Douglass Dumbrille, Clayton Moore, and Damian O'Flynn.
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Jay Silverheels and Clayton Moore with Dale and Roy, at the Sheriff's Rodeo in 1956.
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Roy, Trigger, and Gary Cooper, by Mort Drucker,1929-2020.
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Drucker managed to work some western art into his MAD work.
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I knew Mort Drucker had worked on the DC war comics, but I forgot about, or never knew, he did Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis and other humor stuff in DC comics.
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TV Western for Dell.
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Bob Gu

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JESSE JAMES AT BAY-1941, B&W, 56 minutes.
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Only available in the edited syndicated version. I have the 52:44 minute Alpha edition. The Alpha print does not have any Republic logos and has a generic 'The End'. There is one song missing, "The Old Chisum Trail", per Roy's soundtrack listing at IMDB.

Gabby is the Sheriff and Sally Payne and Gale Storm are reporters.
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Gale Storm, in her first of three Rogers movies, is Roy's love interest.
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Roy plays Jesse James, the outlaw, and Clint Burns, a gambler. Clint Burns masquerades as Jesse James, and, later, Jesse James pretends to be Clint Burns.
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This must have been confusing for Trigger and maybe Roy, too. After this movie, Roy Rogers will only play Roy Rogers, in his remaining Republics.
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The story concerns a land swindle plot that just plain confuses me. Sneaky Pierre Watkins entices farmers to farm the land by promising options for them to buy the land, later, for a few dollars an acre.

Hank Bell, Pierre Watkins, Gabby, and Billy Benedict.
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The railroad company that really owns the land does not honor the option deal with the farmers, for the now improved land and wants $100.00 an acre. Somehow this all profits Watkins as the farmers have to pay Watkins the higher price or he sells the land to others.

Enter Roy. as Jesse James, who robs the railroad and Watkins to get money for the farmers to pay for the land they had improved. Now Watkins hands the deeds over to the farmers even though he knows, but can't prove, they are using his stolen money.

Enter Roy, as Jesse look-a-like, Clint Burns. Watkins hires Burns to impersonate Jesse James and start terrorizing the farmers by shooting folks and burning their homes and fields. Watkins hopes the remaining farmers will be too scared and angry to take money from Jesse, and will abandon their farms.

Roy/Clint pretending to be Roy/Jessie manhandling Sally and Gale.
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Hal Taliaferro, top hat, demands action from Sheriff Gabby.
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Sally captures Roy/Clint thinking it's Roy/Jesse.
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The gals stop in the ladies section of the saloon for some sasparillas.
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Roy/Jesse, disguised as Roy/Clint, gets the drop on Hal Taliaferro.
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In the actual movie, Roy/Jesse and Roy/Clint don't really appear in a scene that required any split screen effect, as in this lobbycard and the same still above. When they finally meet we only see Roy/Clint from the back.
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After Roy/Jesse kills Roy/Clint, Gabby and Roy/Jesse decide to arrest Pierre Watkins and Hal Taliaferro, even though they don't have any evidence. But they take a judge with them and overhear an incriminating conversation between Watkins and Taliaferro. A chase and battle ensues and the two culprits are captured.
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This image used for the lobby cards of JESSE JAMES AT BAY seems to show Pauline Moore with Roy and Gabby and may be from DAYS OF JESSE JAMES-1939.
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This poster had different color versions. Again, the image used is not from JESSE JAMES AT BAY, but, probably, YOUNG BUFFALO BILL-1940 and again showing Pauline Moore, not Gale Storm.
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JESSE JAMES AT BAY- edited YouTube version, with wrong period Republic logo added.
 
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RBailey

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There is a nice looking copy of JESSE JAMES AT BAY on Amazon Prime. It's listed as being from Paramount who has made available a lot of other Republic films. It's a re-release print as it starts with the Republic eagle rather than the bell tower and at the end there's an obvious deletion of the Republic logo between the end title and the closing credits. It runs 53 minutes unfortunately but the print looks very nice.
 

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Always enjoy seeing ol' Hank Bell in these films. Sometimes in the early days, he seems to just be standing around in the background, providing 'local color' to any western backdrop, as townsman or saloon patron. Producers sometimes gave him more lines here and there, although I don't think he technically made the complete leap from 'bit player' to 'character actor.'

I saw Hank Bell in two bit parts recently, in a couple of western comedies. He's immediately noticeable in Abbott and Costello's "Ride 'Em Cowboy" (1942), which is my favorite of the team's films, and looks spectacular on Shout's new Blu-ray set. The other appearance I saw Hank Bell in was in the opening bit of the Harry Langdon two-reeler "The Fighting Parson" (1930), part of that "Langdon at Roach" collection just put out on dvd by Kit Parker. Langdon's humor can be a bit bizarre at times (to say the least), but this particular short worked pretty nicely. Plus, western perennial Bob Kortman also appeared in it. Always get a kick out of seeing these guys outside their normal venues. Kortman was also featured as a villain in a super-rare 1929 Fox 'Clark and McCullough' comedy recently posted on youtube.

Never did get a copy of that Dell "Oh, Susanna" comic, but I always hoped to get one for my collection of tv-related comics. It, along with the Dell Four-Color issue of "Life of Riley" were two that I wanted, but never managed to snag, before my collecting bug (and my wallet) waned. I do have a nice high-grade copy of the first-issue of Charlton's "My Little Margie" comic (from 1954), so at least I have a Gale Storm cover residing in my collection. Speaking of comics, DC has just released a really nice 500-page collection of its foremost western series of the 1970s, "Jonah Hex." Just got it and it looks great. Haven't read these in decades, but I find them good fun, even if a bit more in the grim-and-gritty vein than our Rogers/Autry type standards.
 

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Hank Bell is seen many times driving wagons and stages.
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That Dell "Oh, Susanna" is up at comicbookplus.com.com, along with a bunch of "My Little Margie" comics.

Chic Stone "Margie".
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That Dell, "OH, Susanna" is credited to Alex Toth, but some say it was laid out or penciled by Mike Sekowsky. If that's true I wonder if they teamed on other Dells like "Zorro" or "77 Sunset Strip"?
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Toth Roy Rogers.
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The Range Rider and Dick West,
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Mike Sekowsky was in charge of the Mod Wonder Woman.
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Mike Sekowsky and his Wonder Woman model, Joyce Miller,
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I always thought the Jonah Hex outfit was based on Errol Flynn in "Rocky Mountain" and Scott Brady in "The Maverick Queen". The fringed boots and the gunbelt over the shirt/jacket.
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That Roy Rogers book reprinting stories with Alex Toth and John Bucema art work has finally been released.
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That artwork on "Oh, Susanna" definitely looks like a mixture. Seems mostly Alex Toth to me, except for the faces, which look very Sekowsky-ish. Toth did the artwork on a number of Dell tv-comics that I have, like an issue of "The Real McCoys" and "The Danny Thomas Show." I always liked his vibrant, cinematic style. First noticed him in some of DC's horror comics.

A lot of those early issues of "My Little Margie" have those opening 'greetings' from Margie. Seemed to be a common little touch in some of the comics back then. Very akin to the 'personal greetings' pages found in some of the Fawcett western comics, like those of "Rod Cameron" and "Allan 'Rocky' Lane," etc. Little PR stuff, written by the agents and handlers, similar to movie-mag stories and interviews. I might be an outlier, but I always had a little preference for Fawcett's western comics over the more high-profile Dell ones, even though the latter had some of the most beautifully appealing painted covers.
 

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Rooting around the internet. I was surprised to see all the one-shot comics based on Republic westerns and serials.

But Bert, your mention of Rod Cameron and Rocky Lane, and Dell painted covers sent me on a fun search.
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Dell's "Combat" predated the TV Series "Combat!". TV "Combat!" never had a tie-in comic. I guess Selmur Productions didn't want to fight with Dell over the name. Later Selmur went to Dell for comics featuring "Garrison's Gorillas".
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The Lone Ranger in his red period.
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Tonto saves The Lone Ranger!
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The Lone Ranger saves Tonto!
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The Lone Ranger and the great horse ...Silver!
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I was thinking about how much I enjoyed the Marvel western comics I read in the early 60s. I remembered liking the artwork in "Kid Colt Outlaw". I remembered the name Joe Maneely, because I mixed his name with a name I was reading on the "Gunsmoke" TV series credits, John Mantley. Reading up on Joe Maneely, I see he died in 1958, so I must have been reading earlier "Kid Colt" stories that were reprinted in the 60s comics. It was unusual for comic artists to sign their work back then but Maneely and Jack Keller did along with Stan Lee. I remembered Jack Keller's name once I saw it. Keller was probably the artist I saw the most in "Kid Colt".

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