Roy Rogers in TruColor and Uncut

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,101
Points
610
Love those newspaper ads, Randall! Always so much to pour over. Not just the move showings, but the various night spots, the ads for phonograph records, etc. Although this time the comic-strips also caught my eye. There's "Winnie Winkle" on the top, which was still around in our local newspaper, decades later. A long-running strip you don't hear much about these days. There was actually a series of filmed short-comedies based on "Winnie Winkle" in the late-1920s, produced by the Weiss Brothers. None were included in VCI's "Weiss-a-Rama" dvd collection, and I hope this doesn't mean they don't survive. If they do, I'm assuming Kit Parker has them. I'm rather curious about them. Weiss also had that series of comedy shorts based on another (early-era) strip, "Hairbreadth Harry," a somewhat hokey parody of the old-style melodramas. Several of these float around. I've seen a number of them. They're not necessarily all that great, but they do sport a lot of marvelous, atmospheric location-work in their many chase sequences.

I guess I've always been intrigued by film series based on comic-strips. An interest probably originating in my long-time affection for Columbia's "Blondie" series, not to mention the dozen or more chapterplays based on adventure strips. The success of "Blondie" is likely what inspired Columbia to try out a "Tillie the Toiler" (1942) film, which I'd be curious to see (even if the leading man is William Tracy, who made such a goofy hash out of Terry in the "Terry and the Pirates" serial). Never seen the film, nor the earlier version of "Tillie the Toiler" (1927), an A-budget MGM affair with Marion Davies. But I have seen Fox's "Dixie Dugan" (1943) film, based on another popular, long-running 'girl' strip. The movie was rather average at best, and had a wartime Washington DC backdrop. There'd also been an earlier version of Dixie Dugan, with Alice White playing her in "Show Girl" (1928) and "Show Girl in Hollywood" (1930), the latter sometimes appearing on TCM. Quite a different portrayal of Dugan between the 1920s and 1940s. I wonder if that was the case with the strip itself also. I have a couple of 1940s Dixie Dugan comics books, comprised of reprints, but not ones that went that far back.

I guess the one that got the whole ball rolling was Colleen Moore's "Ella Cinders" (1926). The film itself has very commonly circulated for decades, although its the short/edited Kodascope home-viewer version. I hope the complete version is extant. I really don't know. My grandmother always professed a liking for the Ella Cinders strip, and even though well into adulthood, she purchased a 1940 vintage comic book devoted to Cinders strip reprints. I found it in her attic forty years later, and happily read it and added it to my collection. There was also a "Harold Teen" (1928) film, starring a younger Arthur Lake, ten years before he became Dagwood. The later Hal LeRoy version of "Harold Teen" (1934) is another that occasionally pops up on TCM. Similarly, MGM had a big-budget version of "Bringing Up Father" (1928), while Monogram much later initiated its cheapo series (in 1946), with Joe Yule and Renie Riano. The last one of them, "Jiggs and Maggie Out West" (1950) used to show up quite a bit on tv in the 1980s, believed (apparently incorrectly) to be a PD item. I still have a copy on VHS somewhere. I think Monogram's "Joe Palooka" series from the same time was a hair better, but still no great shakes. Monogram's earlier "Tailspin Tommy" films are mild but decent. But the studio's two "Snuffy Smith" films were the pits.

I know I'm probably forgetting a lot of other examples (how did I get onto this subject?), even while specifically omitting the many 'serial' based titles. There was that independent "Li'l Abner" (1940), released thru RKO, which was very weird and very weak (although I always thought pretty Martha O'Driscoll absolutely nailed the Daisy Mae character). There were the two "Little Orphan Annie" features in the 1930s, first with the popular Mitzi Green (who seems a bit boisterous for the character) in 1932, and then with Ann Gillis (who passed away not all that long ago) in 1938. Anybody ever see the Gillis one? I don't recall ever encountering it anywhere. One of the more forgotten film adaptions of a strip is the late-1920s "Toots and Caspar" shorts, released through FBO. I have an original FBO campaign book from its last (1928-29) season, and it has a colorful, one-page advertisement for the series. Can't forget Columbia's two "Gasoline Alley" films from the early-1950s, either. I rather liked them.

Well, that's more than enough tangential rambling, but I've always been a bit fascinated by this movie/comic nexus. Dang, and I didn't even bring up "Red Ryder" (which would arguably be the most fitting and relevant example for this thread!).
 

Flashgear

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
5,822
Points
1,610
Location
Alberta Canada
Real Name
Randall
Love those newspaper ads, Randall! Always so much to pour over. Not just the move showings, but the various night spots, the ads for phonograph records, etc. Although this time the comic-strips also caught my eye. There's "Winnie Winkle" on the top, which was still around in our local newspaper, decades later. A long-running strip you don't hear much about these days. There was actually a series of filmed short-comedies based on "Winnie Winkle" in the late-1920s, produced by the Weiss Brothers. None were included in VCI's "Weiss-a-Rama" dvd collection, and I hope this doesn't mean they don't survive. If they do, I'm assuming Kit Parker has them. I'm rather curious about them. Weiss also had that series of comedy shorts based on another (early-era) strip, "Hairbreadth Harry," a somewhat hokey parody of the old-style melodramas. Several of these float around. I've seen a number of them. They're not necessarily all that great, but they do sport a lot of marvelous, atmospheric location-work in their many chase sequences.
Bert, I should have posted an enlargement for you, had I known! Actually, snipping these screen shots from newspaper archive microfilm can be tricky. I discovered if I just took a shot of one page, it necessarily wouldn't have the ability to enlarge when clicked on. But if I included the page opposite in the broadsheet, it would. That's why I included that comic strip page. What is your hometown newspaper? It might be on Google Newspapers!

July 6, 1949...Roy's Susanna Pass is about to open, as I posted in the previous page, but in my previous visit to this summer, I missed the fact that Bob Nolan and the Sons of the Pioneers "Circus and Stage Review" were about to appear in person! Click on image to enlarge...
Roy Rogers JUly 6 1949 2.JPG


Roy Rogers July 6 1949 1.JPG
 

Flashgear

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
5,822
Points
1,610
Location
Alberta Canada
Real Name
Randall
When I was an excitable 6 year old, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans (and much of their family) came to my hometown. They were honored guests and parade marshalls in the 1962 Calgary Stampede Parade...Pat Brady was also with them, and they performed a Wild West Show nightly at the Grandstand.

July 7 1962...the biggest ever crowd to greet an arriving Celebrity at our airport...20,000 parents and their screaming kids...including my folks and me in my straw Texas Rangers Cowboy hat...I was hoping that Roy and Dale would deputize me...Click to enlarge...
Roy Rogers July 7 1962 2.JPG


Continued stories from above...Rogers' Era and Cowboy King...click to enlarge...
Roy Rogers July 7 1962 3.JPG


Two stories about Roy's TV show sidekick Pat Brady...
Roy Rogers July 11 1962.JPG


Some interesting background on Pat Brady, including info on his WW2 Army service, and the shrapnel in his head! Sadly, I didn't win the trip to Disneyland that year...
Roy Rogers July 7 1962 1.JPG


May 5, 1962...an interesting advance publicity piece on Roy and Dale's family and adopted kids...page opposite has our TV critic's column and our TV listings for all of our two TV channels...little big town!
(edit) I was disappointed that this shot didn't enlarge enough to comfortably read...give me a little time and I'll re-post a much enlarged set of shots of this image tonight,,,
Roy Rogers May 5 1962.JPG
 
Last edited:

Flashgear

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
5,822
Points
1,610
Location
Alberta Canada
Real Name
Randall
Roy and Dale in the 1962 Calgary Stampede Parade...






They came back for the 1967 parade too, with Dale's little buddy for Bullet (or maybe his hoped for snack?)...


Bobby and Ethel Kennedy in the same parade...




Somehow, I found this image as well...Roy with Frank Sinatra and bandleader Sammy Kaye...
 
Last edited:

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
Say, Randall, it's kind of surprising to see Dale white-haired, or is it blonde?, in the 1962 picture. I wonder if the kids recognized her? Skinny Roy looks the same, as always.
e57d28ebbbbf93928e88be95d6da5bae.jpg

In 1962, I think, CBS was still showing THE ROY ROGERS SHOW on Saturday mornings with SKY KING. She was dark haired on the show. By 1962, I think THE RR SHOW was out of production for six years or more. (I suspect they shot them all at once in the early fifties, no matter how they were released to TV.)

The ad for The Sons of the Pioneers says that it is the groups' first North West show. Did you know Bob Nolan was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba?
9242264fbcedf83b736f0014daf47270.jpg


He sneaked across the border when this guy was not looking. Richard Webb never could stop any Canadian actors from crossing the border!
21943.jpg


Richard Webb was distracted with giving away promotional Border Patrol badges at gas stations.
gettyimages-660532298-612x612.jpg


gettyimages-660532064-612x612.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,101
Points
610
Lots of great stuff on the Calgary Stampede there, Randall. I envy your parade experience! It would be fascinating to learn all the parade marshals, the various event guests, etc., through the years, from celebs, war heroes, famous figures, and beyond.

I'm thinking the earliest western to use the event as a backdrop must have been the aptly titled "The Calgary Stampede" (1925-Universal), one of Hoot Gibson's silent oaters. Which, luckily survives. Grapevine Video has offered a copy for years. It's a fairly enjoyable movie. Hoot's accused of killing his girlfriend's pop, and has to take it on the lam from the Mounties, but ultimately revealing himself at the big Stampede rodeo. Much, if not the majority, of the movie is shot on location, and practically the whole latter half takes place at the rodeo, with lots of genuine rodeo footage. I don't know for a fact, but I'd guess Hoot competed there in the rodeo himself, in the pre-WW1 timeframe, before he hit film stardom. The movie might not be one of Gibson's best, but its historic context and real surroundings boosts it a lot.

The leading lady to Hoot in "Calgary Stampede" is Virginia Brown Faire. She's not very acknowledged as such, but she had a pretty long and prolific career as a b-western leading lady. Although, she certainly wasn't exclusive to the genre. In fact, I suppose her most remembered role was that of Tinker Bell in Paramount's very enjoyable "Peter Pan" (1924), which Kino just put out on blu last year. Great-looking disc, which made my revisiting of it more satisfying than ever. In silents, Faire supported at various times Ken Maynard, Buck Jones, William Desmond, and others. Another Hoot Gibson title she's in (which is also luckily available) is the rather comedy-centric "Chip of the Flying U" (1926). She was also in a Rin-Tin-Tin feature (I'm guessing June Marlowe must have been busy elsewhere). But, most of Faire's westerns are undoubtedly lost. Even quite a few of her early-talkie westerns as well, which tended to be rock-bottom, ultra low-budget cheapies, starring Wally Wales and Rex Lease and the like. One of these known to be lost is "Tex Takes a Holiday" (1932), which starred Wallace MacDonald, who finally ditched acting and became a producer at Columbia, making scores of b-films in the 1940s and 1950s. Including some low-budget westerns I always liked, such as "The White Squaw" (1956) and "The Phantom Stagecoach" (1957). Oh, well. That 'Tex' film is probably a stinker, but I always hate when a film is 'lost.' As for Faire, one of her last b-western leading lady roles is really the only one that has widely circulated for decades, one of John Wayne's 'Lone Star' b-westerns, "West of the Divide" (1934).

What other films utilized the Stampede as a backdrop? Didn't Universal's rodeo film "Bronc Buster" (1952) have a sequence there? I can't recall. Been too many decades since I've seen it, and I don't have a copy.
 

Flashgear

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
1,768
Reaction score
5,822
Points
1,610
Location
Alberta Canada
Real Name
Randall
The ad for The Sons of the Pioneers says that it is the groups' first North West show. Did you know Bob Nolan was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba?
Wow, I didn't know that Bob! Canadians are stealthy like that. Who would have thought that Jack Carson, Victor Jory and Glenn Ford, guys who came across to millions as quintessentially American, were actually Canadian born? The biggest mind blower for me is that uber-British knockout Lois Maxwell (Bond's Miss Moneypenny of course) was born in Kitchener Ontario, and came to Britain in 1942 with the Canadian Army entertainment unit, underage at 15! When her actual age was discovered, she didn't go home, as she was enrolled in the Royal Academy to study acting!

In 1962, I think, CBS was still showing THE ROY ROGERS SHOW on Saturday mornings with SKY KING. She was dark haired on the show. By 1962, I think THE RR SHOW was out of production for six years or more. (I suspect they shot them all at once in the early fifties, no matter how they were released to TV.)
Good info, Bob! They were a Saturday morning staple for me as a kid, and also aired after school for many years up here in Canada's Cowboy country. Thank you for all the great photos and info you find, making this thread a joy!

Lots of great stuff on the Calgary Stampede there, Randall. I envy your parade experience! It would be fascinating to learn all the parade marshals, the various event guests, etc., through the years, from celebs, war heroes, famous figures, and beyond.
Bert, I was astonished to discover how well my hometown newspaper archive is represented on Google, at over 18,000 daily editions since 1888! I browse the heck out of it for free! If you could tell me what your hometown newspaper is, or the closest one to your hometown, I'll see if it's on Google.

About parade marshals...I also remember 1970, when Apollo 13 commander, astronaut Jim Lovell, was in the Stampede parade...less than 3 months after his near-death experience in space with his crew...big wow moment for a space nerd like me...and WW2 fighter ace and Vietnam veteran, USAF general Benjamin O. Davis, one of the famous black American Tuskegee airmen, was also in the same parade...I collected autographs in those days...sadly, I didn't get Roy and Dale's autograph 8 years before...

I'm thinking the earliest western to use the event as a backdrop must have been the aptly titled "The Calgary Stampede" (1925-Universal), one of Hoot Gibson's silent oaters. Which, luckily survives. Grapevine Video has offered a copy for years. It's a fairly enjoyable movie. Hoot's accused of killing his girlfriend's pop, and has to take it on the lam from the Mounties, but ultimately revealing himself at the big Stampede rodeo. Much, if not the majority, of the movie is shot on location, and practically the whole latter half takes place at the rodeo, with lots of genuine rodeo footage. I don't know for a fact, but I'd guess Hoot competed there in the rodeo himself, in the pre-WW1 timeframe, before he hit film stardom. The movie might not be one of Gibson's best, but its historic context and real surroundings boosts it a lot.
I've seen it, but don't have it in my collection. Thank you for the lead to Grapevine Video!

What other films utilized the Stampede as a backdrop? Didn't Universal's rodeo film "Bronc Buster" (1952) have a sequence there? I can't recall. Been too many decades since I've seen it, and I don't have a copy.
Bert, you're right about that! They did film at the actual Calgary Stampede rodeo. I hope that Kino-Lorber might have it in their new Universal acquisitions! I'd love to see it on Blu. Director Budd Boetticher's well known fondness for Mexican bullfighting probably played a role in him doing this film, what with the dangerous bull riding, and putting two bulls in the arena at the same time, crazy! Real rodeo stars like Casey Tibbs and Pete Crump giving it authenticity.


The 1948 British Lion cinecolor feature Northwest Stampede (Joan Leslie, James Craig) filmed extensively at the 1947 Calgary Stampede, Banff and Lake Louise in the Rockies...
There was one episode of Wide Country where they used some film from Calgary, but that Earl Holliman/Andrew Prine show never actually came here. Stoney Burke never did either, much to my disappointment.

Warner Brothers did do an eye-popping technicolor 1948 short (approx. 18m) film that is on Youtube...marvelous nostalgia for me...

I went back and took some enlargements of the May 5, 1962 advance publicity story about Roy and Dale's 8 kids, 5 of them adoptees, in advance for their Stampede appearance that July...this should be easier to read...click to enlarge further...
Roy Rogers May 5 1962 1.JPG


Roy Rogers May 5 1962 2.JPG
 
Last edited:

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
BELLS OF CORONADO-1950, Trucolor, 66-67 minutes.
a (1).jpg

I have the full versions on Republic Home Video VHS from 1991 and the Lions/Gate/Spelling/Republic 2005 DVD .
VHS & DVD covers.
a (2).jpg

This DVD, of BELLS OF CORONADO, was the only Roy Rogers movie, released on DVD, with a licensed print controlled by Paramount, until the two Kino releases, on DVD and Blu-Ray, SUNSET IN THE WEST and TRIGGER, JR. in 2017 and 2018.

a (3).jpg

There are DVD releases of BELLS OF CORONADO in Germany and Spain. I don't know what sources the Euros used.

Grape Vine has released a DVD-R and Blu-Ray-R of BELLS OF CORONADO. According to our saddle pal, John/RBailey, the Grape Vine Blu looked "awful" and that the old Republic Home Video VHS looked better.

The Lion's Gate DVD is out of print, but is the one to get if you can find it on Amazon Marketplace.

a (4).JPG

The plot: A mine owner is found injured and the wagon load of uranium ore he was delivering is missing. The man dies later. His company is taken over by his business partner, Grant Withers.
a (5).JPG

Roy is hired by Ed Cobb and John Hamilton to investigate. They represent the insurance company covering the loss. They suspect foul play. I always thought Cobb and Hamilton looked and sounded alike. It's fun to see them side by side in this movie.
a (6).jpg

a (7).JPG

Of course, sneaky, Grant Withers is a suspect.
a (8).jpg

Or could it be, kindly, Doctor Leo Cleary?
a (9).JPG


Could it be Dale? No, but she gets Roy beat up, when she provokes a big fist fight.

Dale doesn't talk to strangers.
a (12).JPG

Fight aftermath: Clifton Young, the lead henchman, Roy, Dale, Grant Withers, and Pat Brady.
a (12)b.JPG


Roy, working undercover, gets hired by Withers, who also owns the local electric power company. Withers assigns Roy to help Pat Brady and The Riders of the Purple Sage to work on the power towers.
a (10).JPG

Roy confronts Withers with Sheriff Stuart Randall. Randall play Sheriffs all the time. He was the regular Sheriff on the LARAMIE TV series.
a (14).JPG

Roy suspects the outlaws want to sell the uranium ore to the other side.

Henry Rowland, representing the other side, with Clifton Young.
a (18).JPG


Roy stops Lane Bradford from stealing more uranium ore.
a (15).JPG

a (16).jpg

But the bad guys are not through yet. Robert Bice gets the drop on Roy. Later, Bice was an operative for The Paul Drake Detective Agency, on the PERRY MASON series.
a (17).jpg

There are wagon stunts and stuntman jumps, plus the Lydeckers blacking out a nice scale model town. (I think it's a model, after all it's dark!) Plus an airplane and a Geiger counter figure in the story. And classic fast riding with Trigger,
c (23).JPG

I don't remember hearing or seeing any Bells of Coronado ringing. Maybe I couldn't hear them over all the shooting.
a (19).JPG

PDVD_002.JPG

YouTube: Here's a full version, a very soft cut version, and a trailer. Take notice of the color differences, especially the denim.




 

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,101
Points
610
"Bells of Coronado" (1950) has always been a favorite of mine. Probably my second favorite 'color' Roy Rogers outing, only behind "Trail of Robin Hood" (1950). I bought the Republic VHS, and then the Lion's Gate DVD. It's a very visually appealing film, with its variety of backdrops, like the dam and reservoir, uranium mine, airplane, powerline towers, etc. Dale has some fun moments, and Pat Brady (a tad more low-key than later on) does fine with some comic sidekick duties. Plus, a good 'hidden' villain mastermind behind the nefarious activities. All in all, a particularly solid, well-paced bit of modern-day western fun.

On the film-veteran front, besides Edmund Cobb, we also briefly see Rex Lease as a black-clad shipping clerk who receives the wagonload of ore from Roy. Only has a line or two. But Lease (like Cobb) had been a minor-league cowboy star in early talkies, with a little series for Tiffany, then one for First Division in the mid-1930s, amidst other low-budget hijinx like "The Monster Walks" (1932), a common PD fixture. I often spot Lease in tiny bit parts and 'extra' roles in 1950s-era westerns, usually playing a background townsman, not unlike Kermit Maynard (who we discussed earlier). I recall a silly little anecdote about Lease in an interview with b-western leading lady Marion Shilling from the excellent "Westerns Women" book by Boyd Magers and Michael Fitzgerald. Shilling mentions that Lease came by her home shortly after they'd completed the cheapo serial "The Clutching Hand" (1936) together, and asked to borrow her package of photo stills from it, to help him get an upcoming part. He said he'd return the stills to her, but never did, despite her prodding. Ever since reading that, whenever I spot Lease in one of those tiny bit parts in 50s westerns, often sitting on a saloon stool, or leaning on a wall, looking a bit old and paunchy, I always want to gab at the screen and tell Lease to get off his duff and return Marion's "Clutching Hand" photos, darnit.

Rex Lease's career path reminds me a bit of Reed Howes' who also often wound up being a nondescript western townsman in bit parts in later 50s westerns. Both actors in their youth (at the same general time) specialized as 'action' heroes in independent, low-budget adventure films. Contemporary stuff, like the things Richard Talmadge was always doing. Both Lease and Howes started in silents, and made it through to talkies for a while. But always in the most cheapo fare, struggling along similarly, and both eventually winding up sharing the same kind of parts in westerns in their more elder years. Only difference is that Howes never quite headlined a specifically 'western' series. Anyway, I tend to keep an eye out for both gents, usually in the backgrounds of scenes, but often getting a little line or two, here or there.
 

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
Adding some visuals to the folks Randall and Bert mentioned.
842614104602.jpg

rexlease_signofthewolf.jpg

"North of the Divide" Virginia Brown Faire and Mr. Wayne
duke_700.jpg

jackperrin_rainbowriders.jpg

I couldn't find any cowgirl pictures of Lois Maxwell. She did make a movie with Shirley Temple, "That Hagen Girl"-1947. Roy co-stars Jean Porter and Penny Edwards, plus Rory Calhoun were in it.
apkvww67pqd6p7dw.jpg

That_Hagen_Girl-DVD-R0-Warner-04108.jpg


She made a film with Dale Robertson, but that was not a western either.
high_terrace_1956_style_B_original_film_art_spo_2000x.jpg


s-l1600.jpg

gettyimages-1137254987-612x612.jpg


Lois_Maxwell-NSC-1.jpg

12987518_ori.jpg


f25c698ab4a6408e4ad1e7103cc200d4--vintage-hollywood-vintage-beauty.jpg

She made LIFE magazine, with Marilyn.
87391204_o.jpg

105608758_o.jpg

72992158.jpg

62084922.jpg

62084734.jpg


Jane Nigh and Cathy Downs made westerns.
border-treasure-d7c2e5d8c38fb98df9d7dd41ba018fdb.jpg


Cathy Downs and Henry Fonda, "My Darling Clementine".
My_Darling_Clementine_1946_52.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
The names of three of the actors, Bert, mentioned. The names seem familiar, but no faces jumped out for me to match the names. After research:

Richard Talmadge, after finding pictures, I still don't recognize him. But I see that his later career was as a stunt man/stunt coordinator, maybe I shouldn't recognize him.
0.png

0a.jpg


Rex Lease. I do recognize him, now, as one of those posse/gang member types in the Rogers pictures and other movies.
1.jpg

2a rexlease_cowboyandbandit.jpg

3.jpg

4.jpg


Rex Lease's co-star, in "The Clutching Hand", Marion Shilling.
untitled.png

16.jpg

marion-shilling-american-film-actress-publicity-portrait-circa-1930s-e4c7rf.jpg

740full-marion-shilling.jpg



Reed Howes was the big surprise! His young star photos made me think I didn't know him.

Young Reed Howes with Clara Bow, The "IT" girl, herself.
6 Clara_Bow_from_Rough_House_Rosie_1_Reed_Howes-460x600.jpg

5 rough-house-rosie-lobbycard-clara-bow-reed-howes-1927,2408102.jpg



Then the picture with the mustache came up, and the, "Oh, it's that guy!", moment happened.
5  Reed Howes 1900-1964.jpg


Howes, with Randolph Scott, Frank J. Scannell, George Macready, and Lee Marvin, in "The Stranger Wore A Gun".
7 Reed Howes1.jpg

8 stranger_wore_gun_1953.jpg

Even though I didn't know their names, I thought Howes and Scannell were the same person or at least related. Scannell was another actor who played bartenders as he got older.

Scannell with Hugh O'Brian.
9.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,101
Points
610
More great pictures, Bob! I love all that stuff. Used to enjoy collecting original stills and lobby cards of this nature. I didn't recall that Reed Howes had been at Paramount (as shown in that Clara Bow film). Must have been a fairly brief stay. But it brought to mind another actor whose career-path was so similar to Howes and Rex Lease... none other than Lane Chandler, who was under contract to Paramount in the late-1920s, and had a little shot at stardom. Paramount even starred him a little western, "The Open Range" (1927), among a variety of other films. But the studio also had a young Gary Cooper there at the time, essaying similar stuff, and he's the one whose career (obviously) really took off. By the time talkies arrived, Chandler was starring in those ultra-cheap, independent westerns. They didn't last for long, though, and Chandler became another extremely prolific 'bit player' well into 1950s tv-westerns and beyond. He's absolutely everywhere back then, not just westerns. I'm constantly spotting him. He seemed to work more and generally have larger and better parts than Lease/Howes, and certainly that of Kermit Maynard (who was really more of an 'extra' player than a 'bit part' one, by that time).

I'm glad about Marion Shilling making it to Blu-ray, courtesy of VCI's recent release of "The Red Rider" (1934) serial. She's a delightful leading lady in that. Probably my favorite western serial. Shilling started off big-time at MGM, but quickly fell back down to earth in b-westerns and poverty-row stuff. She made several appearances at western film festivals in her later years, but I never managed to cross paths with her. The Warner Archive just last year put out her first film, "Wise Girls" (1929), one of those very talky early-talkies (and a rather overlong one at that).

As for Richard Talmadge, yeah, he was the big 'stunt king' action-star for a long time, albeit in very, very low-budget fare. A lot of his films do tend to circulate on the cheap disc labels, thanks to their PD status. They might be a bit dated and creaky for many folks' tastes, but they tend to sport some amazing stuntwork and constant tumbling by Talmadge. He's like a jumping bean at times. My two preferred Talmadge films are "On Your Guard" (1933), which has a nice, fairly vivid 'northwestern' lumber-camp type atmosphere, and also "Step on It" (1936), where Talmadge plays a motorcycle cop. The latter features Lois Wilde, who'd been leading lady in Republic's well-remembered sci-fi serial "Undersea Kingdom" that same year, along with 1930s b-western badman Roger Williams in an atypically 'good-guy' role as Talmadge's buddy. Yeah, creaky, primitive, zero-budget stuff, but potentially fun if one has an open mind about it. I'm hoping VCI will be continuing its Universal serial releases and give us the Talmadge-starring "Pirate Treasure" (1934). I'd like to replace my blurry VHS tapes of it, which I've had for probably twenty-five years or so.
 

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
Lane Chandler was sure all over. He even played Roy Rogers father in SAGA OF DEATH VALLEY-1939 and had roles in three more. Seems like he should have been in more. I even saw him this week, in a good part, as a loyal ranch foreman, when I re-watched "Tall Man Riding"-1955, and a small part in "North West Mounted Police"-1940.
1 deadwood dick.jpg

0.jpg

2.jpg

Leslie Fenton, Chandler, Gary Cooper, and Paul Fix.
3 leslie fenton.jpg

7.jpg

And Clara Bow!
4.jpg



I watched that YouTube of "Northwest Stampede". And Lane Chandler was in that one too!!
northwest-stampede-us-poster-from-left-james-craig-joan-leslie-1948-e5njcc.jpg


"Stampede" had a good story and beautiful color photography. I enjoyed it, very much.
Joan Leslie was very, very good in it. Although she was in a lot of well known movies, she was never really on my radar. I have to take a better look at her movies, that I have in my collection.
northwest-stampede-dxnewr.jpg

jack-oakie-joan-leslie-northwest-stampede-1948-c8chyy.jpg

Cross promotion.
Sinclair-1947-Life-45-Nov-10-127.jpg

mLOL8jjLTS4aPDNmQlGWXNVVSnw.jpg

fbb949d9898838a7227491a38687143a.jpg

leslie3_3474688b.jpg

joan-leslie-tanzte-mit-fred-astaire-und-betoerte-gary-cooper-.jpg

joanleslie22.jpg


f7be4ed9ae1fba83a8b152ffd7d0c056--joan-leslie-in-living-color.jpg

the sky's the limit-joan-leslie-fred-astaire.jpg



Joan Leslie was in Republic westerns, too.
23393854082_47e4192b96.jpg


Also in the cast of, "Lynched"- John Lund from, "Bronc Buster", Dick 'Sergeant Preston' Simmons and Gordon 'Splinters' Jones.
800full-woman-they-almost-lynched-photo.jpg

toughest-man-in-arizona-us-poster-top-from-left-joan-leslie-vaughn-E5NWDJ.jpg
 

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
Part One:
SPRINGTIME IN THE SIERRAS-1947, Trucolor, 75 minutes.
1.jpg
I not sure if this one was considered a lost Trucolor. But when the mom and pop collector bootleggers started offering it around 2006, or so, to the general movie buff market, it was a pretty big deal in fan circles.

Alpha and Film Chest offered restored versions in 2012.
Film Chest and Alpha DVD covers.
2  Film Chest Alpha DVD covers.jpg

Both DVD releases looked pretty much the same to me, but the Film Chest release came in with a shorter run time because they took out some flippy frames. I wrote about this in Post #89. In post #165 I wrote about the print that had run on GritTV at that time, which was a much better restoration, than the Film Chest and Alpha, and possibly may have come from a Paramount restored print. (It's been two years and Grit has not rerun this restored print.)

Night scenes were especially brighter and more detailed on the GritTV print.

Some comparisons:
Collector Print, daytime scene.
3 collector.JPG

Alpha:
4  alpha.JPG

Film Chest:
5  fc.JPG

Black and White production still and B&W screen grab, from a B&W print on YouTube, for a night time studio scene. Note how little shadowing there is in how the scene was lit.
6 production still note the lighting.jpg

7  capture from B&W YT.jpg

Collector DVD-R.
8  c7.JPG

Alpha-DVD.
9  alpha 7.JPG


Film Chest DVD.
10 fc13.JPG

GritTV-(Had to resort to cell phone pics of the TV playback, for these next two) LCD. This print looked great live.
11  lcd.jpg


GritTV print from CRT TV. Illustrating lack of old print shadows.
12  crt.jpg


13.jpg

SPRINGTIME IN THE SIERRAS is the first of five Roy Rogers movies that co-starred Jane Frazee.
14.jpg

15.jpg

16.JPG

17.jpg

18.jpg

SPRINGTIME IN THE SIERRAS is Andy Devine's second time in a Rogers picture as 'Cookie Bullfincher'. This time he's a flash pan photographer.

Watch the birdie!!
19.jpg

20.jpg
 

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
Part Two: SPRINGTIME IN THE SIERRAS.

The story: Roy and The Pioneers are horse dealers and have sold a herd to Stephanie Bachelor for her ranch.
21.jpg


Bachelor's ranch is a front for an illegal, out of season, hunting operation, that sells the meat to restaurants.

Jane Frazee's brother Hal Landon has fallen in with the poachers.
22.JPG

Landon, with Bachelor and henchman/partner Roy Barcroft.
23.JPG

When, old timer, Harry Cheshire catches them in the act and is murdered, Roy investigates.

Harry Cheshire with Pioneer Shug Fisher and Andy Devine.
24.jpg

25.jpg

Roy becomes suspicious of Landon and Bachelor.
26.jpg

Bachelor is suspicious of Roy.
27.jpg

Roy has three big fights with Barcroft. He wins the first one.
28.jpg

29.jpg

Roy loses the second fight and winds up locked in a big freezer with Landon.
30.jpg

31.jpg

32.jpg

33.jpg

Roy and Landon break out of the freezer using a block of ice as a battering ram!
34.jpg


Fight three starts out as a blazing shootout and becomes a horse chase and a joust with Roy and Roy fighting with their empty rifles, as swords, and later with fists. Jane and Stephanie end up in a fist fight too.
35.JPG

36.jpg

37.JPG

Andy and The Pioneers to the rescue.
38.jpg

39.jpg

There is a lot of music. My favorite tune, in this, is, " A Cowboy Has To Sing".

40.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,101
Points
610
I have the Film Chest disc of "Springtime." It was great to finally see this in color, although the print seemed awfully waxy and de-grained. Personally, I love the look of natural grain, whether from some fine 35mm or some old, beat-up 16mm tv-print. So I'm not too keen on such monkeying. But at least we can see the color! And it's a pretty nice Rogers outing, and we get the memorable villainy of Stephanie Bachelor. I still need to get around to some of Bachelor's mystery-oriented Republic titles from the mid-1940s, like "Port of Forty Thieves" (1944) and "Secrets of Scotland Yard" (1944). I've been negligent on that front.

Andy Devine is always good for comic relief. In some ways, I've often thought he had such a broad personality (along with broad girth) that he was almost too overwhelming a character to ideally be a 'western sidekick.' That he's so engaging that he'd virtually overshadow the cowboy hero. Been a long while since I watched a "Wild Bill Hickok" episode to gauge this notion, however. Devine was also a really good, underrated actor, too, and quite adept at drama. Talented guy, and extremely well-liked by his Hollywood peers. Andy's son Dennis wrote a book on his father not too long ago, and I suspect it's an interesting read. Been meaning to get it. A young Dennis can be seen with his father on screen in the top-notch "Canyon Passage" (1946), which Kino is putting out on blu next month. It's such a visually striking film, and I bet it's going to look great on blu.

Sidekick-wise, I particularly like those adventure-themed Universal B's that teamed Devine with Richard Arlen. Things like "Tropic Fury" (1939) and "Danger on Wheels" (1940), which come first to mind, since I still have old VHS copies of them. Don't know how many Arlen-Devine films were made in all. Seven? Eight? Still several I haven't seen. I've always particularly wanted to encounter "Legion of Lost Flyers" (1939), but probably just because I like the title. Devine seemed to make more films at Universal than anywhere else, and that's the studio where his career also seemed to initially take off. He started with tiny roles in late-silents and early-talkies, which is where he finally began making a little headway. Used to wonder what his breakout role was (so to speak). Often thought it could have been his extremely memorable bit in "Law and Order" (1932), as the simpleton whom Walter Huston convinces what an honor it was to be the first 'legally' hanged citizen in town. But actually, I think it was earlier, in "The Spirit of Notre Dame" (1931), where Devine's career broke out from minor bits to solid character roles. He was in a good number of those Laemmle-era Universals, like the very grim "Radio Patrol" (1932) starring Robert Armstrong, and also as Lew Ayre's ambulance-driver buddy in "Impatient Maiden" (1932), where Andy gets romantically teamed with Una Merkel! They made a funny couple together in that film. And actually, come to think of it, there's also a book out on Una Merkel, which Bear Manor published not too long ago. I have a copy of it, which I ran across at a show a few years back. Merkel's always a pip. I"ve always adored her.
 

Robin9

Producer
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
5,389
Reaction score
3,415
Points
9,110
Real Name
Robin
Andy Devine is always good for comic relief. In some ways, I've often thought he had such a broad personality (along with broad girth) that he was almost too overwhelming a character to ideally be a 'western sidekick.' That he's so engaging that he'd virtually overshadow the cowboy hero. Been a long while since I watched a "Wild Bill Hickok" episode to gauge this notion, however. Devine was also a really good, underrated actor, too, and quite adept at drama. Talented guy, and extremely well-liked by his Hollywood peers. Andy's son Dennis wrote a book on his father not too long ago, and I suspect it's an interesting read. Been meaning to get it. A young Dennis can be seen with his father on screen in the top-notch "Canyon Passage" (1946), which Kino is putting out on blu next month. It's such a visually striking film, and I bet it's going to look great on blu.
Canyon Passage has been out on Blu-ray disc in the U. K. for some time and it looks great. I assume the Kino disc comes from the same transfer, so you'll be more than pleased by it.

Anyone who admires Andy Devine's acting should make a point of seeing Pete Kelly's Blues where he plays a - for him - unusual role. I'll probably watch that movie tonight: another very good Blu-ray disc.
 

Bob Gu

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 17, 2006
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
2,122
Points
1,610
Real Name
Bob Gudera
I, too, enjoyed Stephanie Bachelor as the leader of the poaching gang in SPRINGTIME IN THE SIERRAS.
1.jpg

She's another one of those short timer actresses that passed through Roy's movies. Her movie career lasted 24 movies, 20 of them at Republic, 1943-48.

2.jpg

Her first role was a showy performance in, "Lady of Burlesque",-1943, starring Barbara Stanwyck.
lady-of-burlesque-production-still_7-1943.jpg

s-l1600hat.jpg

s-l1600lob.jpg

Like some of Roy's other female co-stars she was in a Deanna Durbin picture, "His Butler's Sister"-1943.

And, as Bert mentioned, she was another Republic Crime Queen.

her primitive man.jpg


this.jpg


bigger.png

"Secrets of Scotland Yard"-1944, with Lionel Atwill, John Abbott, and Matthew Boulton.
secrets-of-scotland-yard-us-1944-l-r-lionel-atwill-john-abbott-stephanie-matthew boulton.jpg

s-l1600crimequeen.jpg

passkeytodanger.jpg

MV5BZmYyYjdiMWEtNzBlMi00MmVmLWFhODItODg4MjA2OGRhYjJkXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMDMxMjQwMw@@._V1_.jpg

85788.jpg

I thought she was playing nice in this one, but turns out she has an agenda.


Bachelor's not the star of "Blackmail"-1947, but it's interesting. William Marshall stars as the famous pulp private-eye, 'Dan Turner, Hollywood Detective', by Robert Leslie Bellem. Bellem had a long career in magazine and TV writing, and was even a story editor on The F.B.I. TV series.

With Ricardo Cortez and George Lewis.
Blackmail 1947 Dan Turner movie (8).jpg

 
Last edited:

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
789
Reaction score
1,101
Points
610
The photo of "Lady of Burlesque" (1943-UA) tells me that Stephanie Bachelor's career wasn't 'entirely' restricted to Republic (like I thought). But mostly so. I don't think there are too many B-players whose leading man/lady roles were 100% exclusive to a single studio, but there are a few, and a few others come close. Jinx Falkenburg at Columbia comes to mind. Did Linda Stirling ever do any films outside Republic, other than a few bit parts? I think Eleanor Whitney, who starred in a number of breezy B-musical-comedies at Paramount in the 1930s, never strayed from her home studio. I also associate Louise Campbell with Paramount, although she might have eventually gravitated to poverty-row. Did Sydney Fox ever have a leading-lady role outside of Universal? Not sure, but I can't think of one.

On the flip side of the coin, what about B-stars who might have managed to star in at least one film at just about EVERY studio? The closest leading-lady I can think of is Jean Parker. She was with MGM at first, culminating in things like "Sequoia" (1934), before eventually fleeing from Louis Mayer's greasy clutches. During that time, she did some RKO's, like the neat rural melodrama "Two Alone" (1934) and the Fred Stone comedy "Farmer in the Dell" (1936), the latter film strangely absent from TCM, even though I saw it on TNT thirty years ago. At Paramount, Parker was leading-lady to George Raft in "Limehouse Blues" (1934) and to Fred MacMurray in "The Texas Rangers" (1936). She starred in "Life Begins with Love" (1937) for Columbia. Lots of Republics, twice opposite Phil Regan in 1939, and later headlining "The Girl from Alaska" (1942). Many Monogrammers too, from "Romance of the Limberlost" (1938) to those two Kitty O'Day comedy-mysteries in the mid-1940s. Parker also made tons of those Pine-Thomas titles at Paramount... "Wrecking Crew" (1942), "Alaska Highway" (1943), etc. She was probably their most prolific leading-lady. Parker was also in PRC's "Bluebeard" (1944). Not much over at Fox, although she was in "Caravan" (1934), that odd but enjoyable gypsy-musical confection, and (if I recall correctly), she wound up winning the leading-man, Charles Boyer, over the main star, Loretta Young. The only studio I don't think Parker worked under is Warner Bros.

As for B-level leading men who seemed to work at every studio, I think William Gargan must be in the top spot, or near it. Early on, he headlined RKO's "Headline Shooter" (1933), and was also lead in a few Columbia's like "The Line-Up" (1934), which I've always wanted to see, and "Alibi For Murder" (1936), the latter available thru Sony Archives. At Warners, Gargan was lead in several of their minor, mid-1930s B's, like the funny "A Night at the Ritz" (1935), which I always liked. He starred in the early Republic "Navy Born" (1936), a common pd title. He did a few scattered Paramounts, like the loopy comedy-mystery "She Asked for It" (1937). Gargan starred in a ton of Universal B's, from "Reported Missing" (1936) to "The House of Fear" (1939) and "Song of the Sarong" (1945). Didn't do too much at MGM, but he was one of the title characters in their "Joe and Ethel Turp Call on the President" (1939), which I haven't seen in eons. At Columbia again, he took over the Ellery Queen role from Ralph Bellamy in that early-1940s series of films. Like Jean Parker, he was in a slew of those Pine-Thomas films at Paramount, like "Midnight Manhunt" (1945) and "Dynamite" (1949), and such. He even finally made it to Fox studios for "Behind Green Lights" (1946), and producer Sol Wurtzel's "Rendezvous 24" (1946). Never seen those. I think Gargan covered just about every base, other than dipping down to Monogram and PRC (that I know of).

Hmm, anyone think of any other B-stars that managed to work at just about every studio, more than either Jean Parker or William Gargan? I thought maybe Edward Norris, but although he zipped around just about as much, he was often limited to 'second leads' and down-the-cast roles.
 

Forum Sponsors

Staff online

Forum statistics

Threads
343,728
Messages
4,688,274
Members
141,022
Latest member
kanchibrneha