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Roy Rogers in TruColor and Uncut

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Richard--W, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. Flashgear

    Flashgear Screenwriter

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    Bob, here's some more premiere showings of Roy Rogers movies as seen in my hometown newspaper archive...

    July 8, 1950...
    Roy Rogers Twilight 1.JPG
    Roy Rogers Twilight 2.JPG
     
  2. Flashgear

    Flashgear Screenwriter

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    October 14, 1950...
    Roy Rogers Trigger jr. 1.JPG
    Roy Rogers Trigger jr. 2.JPG
     
  3. Message #403 of 454 Jan 8, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    It is fun to see those ads, Randall, and what movies were around in the same time frame. In the first group of ads you posted. Post #395, I noticed, in the fine print, that there were three different Roy Rogers and three different Bowery Boys movies playing. I guess they made the rounds from theater to theater. If you were a fan of series movies. I guess you needed a bicycle.

    14513589111_2ca26e6d6a_z.
    I see many Republics played up in the Great North. More Frankie Darro.

    heart-of-virginia-from-left-frankie-darro-sam-mcdaniel-janet-martin-e5ncg7.
    More Moore. That is Constance Moore.

    earl-carroll-sketchbook-top-l-r-william-marshall-constance-moore-bottom-e5mce8.

    Moore was another Republic musical gal.

    72e818d1-30d8-441e-bb1f-f81d4fe97462_1.34907f2ea21836b5a869b4f4e05acfa3.

    Maybe you might of needed two bicycles to keep up.

    bff29635bd553eac65df6a7d5ee1d436--ride-a-bike-vintage-bicycles.
    Moore has a very nice, classy, presence.

    Moore clowning with Roy's KING OF THE COWBOYS co-star Peggy Moran.
    f7b7a5235780bd978f7e1d730a65d2b8.

    Moore with George Reeves in "Argentine Nights"-
    argentine-nights-from-left-george-reeves-constance-moore-1940_a-L-13186890-8363144.

    Charlie McCarthy, Edgar Bergen, and W.C. Fields-"You Can't Cheat An Honest Man".
    sd.
    you-can-t-cheat-an-honest-man-constance-moore-w-c-fields-1939.

    With Boris Karloff.
    f5ba3b0246a47cbf3e5d5d3f5e284635.

    8406668790_5458c4096a_z.
    But what's Constance Moore got to do with Roy Rogers? Well, Moore was in the first higher budget, Republic, William Elliott movie, "In Old Sacramento" -1946.
    8f1568e49c292dc4e390bae47bbdb5fb.
    sww.
    "In Old Sacramento" was a remake of the Roy Rogers movie, THE CARSON CITY KID"-1940.
    9272fc0dc8160856fd2c4eb7b6ac554a.
     
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  4. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    I love all the old newspaper ads for local theater showings. I've spent a lot of time sifting through such things. In the neighborhood I grew up (1920s/30s era homes), there was a small 'second-run' theater about three blocks away. I saw a few movies there as a kid, before it closed down, but I was too young to partake in all that old-time Saturday matinee fare. All that pre-dated me. About 20 years ago, I'd moved back to my hometown, and started going regularly to the library, where I must have spent well over a hundred hours zipping through the microfilm of the vintage local newspapers.

    When it came to listings for my neighborhood theater, I took copious notes on everything they ran... the serials, the b-westerns, the various studio product they leased. Every week, from the 1930s to the early-1960s. I was curious as to what film packages they rented, and to just get an overall feel for what was being screened, and what days and times. It really gave me a good understanding of the selections, like standalone "B" features screened for one-day on Wednesday nights, versus the Mon-Tue attractions, or the weekend "A" film headliners, along with the Saturday afternoon matinees. Got a bit of a vicarious kick out of all this. Also always fascinated me, the re-issues, where things like older Roy Rogers westerns like "Down Dakota Way" (1949) or Gene Autry's "Trail to San Antone" (1947) were still matinee features in 1957, along with things like Abbott and Costello's "Ride 'em Cowboy" (1942) and "Who Done It?" (1942). The more rural vicinities that were late to television kept that whole flame going for quite a long time.
     
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  5. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Back to Sheila Bromley for a moment, I'm often intrigued by actresses who specialized in heavies or 'other' women, who'd actually started out in normal leading-lady roles. Maybe these gals were particularly adept at a certain harsh gaze or evil stare, and found themselves ultimately typecast in villainess roles. Not always a bad thing, as it likely extended their careers, but I think of actresses like Bromley, Claire Dodd, Gail Patrick, Helen Vinson, Lola Lane, and such. Yet, then it's sometimes startling to see them all pleasant and bright-eyed in their earlier heroine roles, where they often prove to be most delightful!

    As for Sheila Bromley, the Sony mod-dvd line did put out a nifty little B-film she provided leading-lady duties for, "Death Goes North" (filmed in 1937, released in 1939). It's a combination Mountie/dog-action/detective story, with Rin-Tin-Tin Jr. along for the ride, and it's a reasonably pleasing affair despite its modest pacing and banal leading man. And of all things, it's a Mountie picture that's actually shot in Canada (BC, I think)! It's one of those oddball Columbia properties released under the Central Films banner. There were ten or twelve of them, all filmed in Canada, around 1936-38. Sony's mod-dvd line also released another of these, "Special Inspector" (1938), featuring a pre-stardom Rita Hayworth. It's okay, but a bit bland, as I recall. The one I'd be most curious to see is "Tugboat Princess" (1936), which features Valerie Hobson along with a young Edith Fellows (who was Columbia's foremost kid actor in the late-1930s). But I've never seen this one around.

    Some of the earlier Canada-lensed 'Central Films' productions seem to have fallen into public-domain. Alpha has released a few of these, like "What Price Vengeance" (1937), "Lucky Corrigan" (1936), and "Murder is News" (1937), the latter with the lovely Iris Meredith. There were also two Charles Starrett westerns in this Central Films batch. "Stampede" (1936) is the common one, having circulated amongst collectors for many years now, and now found everywhere. The more rare one is "Secret Patrol" (1936), which I've never seen. Both Starrett titles featured the same cast and crew.

    Actually, Charles Starrett also figured prominently in Canadian cinema beyond this, by starring (despite his being an American), in Canada's first talking feature, "The Viking" (1931). No, it's not about Vikings, but rather a boat crew heading north to hunt seals. The film has a bit of notorious fame, due to a tragedy that occurred during some later location work, killing many in the film crew. I've run across the story on the internet a number of times, but don't recall the exact specifics. I find it a very, very interesting curiosity, although I suspect the slow pace and primitive filming might make it rough going for most modern viewers.
     
  6. Message #406 of 454 Jan 10, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2020
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    Oops! Managed to duplicate the post below. So here's some period Dale cheesecake and some newer colorization.

    wt56_daleevans_adelemara_ja pub for bells of rosarita see other in post.
    This is a companion photo to one below I posted earlier in the thread.
    dale_adel_janet.
    Cowgirls (8).
    s-l1600s.
    4fbbb19bfb394285036835af569857fc--old-hollywood-hollywood-glamour.
     
  7. Message #407 of 454 Jan 10, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2020
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    So, Bert, do you know, from your research, when Republic stopped sending out movie packages to theaters? (Since they were closing up shop.)

    The re-issues of older stuff makes me wonder when that large group of, edited for TV, (edited bits throw out), Roy Rogers movies made their last, full-length, rounds in theaters? (Everything from UNDER WESTERN SKIES-1938 to THE FAR FRONTIER-1948.)

    1.
    2.




    Great,Bert! More Mountie movies to look for! I have some of those Mountie Rin-Tin-Tin movies on a few Critic's Choice DVDs. I keep meaning to research James Oliver Curwood. His name seems to be on every Mountie movie ever made.

    3.
    Special%20Inspector%2001.

    Seems Rita Hayworth was teamed up often with Charles Quigley. From "The Game That Kills"- 1937, also with Paul Fix.

    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.



    It's fun to spot actresses, early in their careers, playing young romantic roles,
    when you first noticed them playing older parts and crusty battleaxes.

    I was watching an F.B.I.-1965, with Lynn Bari and was stunned to see her playing a frowsy barfly. Earlier in the week I watched her in "The Amazing Mr. X"- 1948, as an elegant high society woman being duped by a con-man.


    7a  Amazing Mr X 02 Poster.

    Donald Curtis, Cathy O'Donnell, Turhan Bey, and Lynn Bari.
    8 The_Amazing_Mr._X_1948_1.

    A.K.A.
    9 The%20Amazing%20Mr.X-Poster-web1.

    Lynn Bari.
    10 Lynn_Bari_crop.
    11 tumblr_lv0ti4yV0l1qa55qyo1_500.
     
  8. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Re-issue dates of older films, making new bookings at second-run theaters, always interested me. I don't know of any reference book that really documents such information (excepting things like Astor re-issues of Universal fare). Usually, besides a few scattered issues of "Box-Office Barometer," the only way I've learned of such info is by encountering monochrome lobby-cards dating to later releases. That is, besides these newspaper advertisements of local theater offerings. Here is where I noted my little neighborhood theater ran some 'older' items like Bill Elliott's "In Early Arizona" (1938) at a Saturday matinee in 1951. That same year, 1951, they also screened Roy Rogers' "Frontier Pony Express" (1938) and "The Ranger and the Lady" (1940). Not to mention, Judy Canova in "Sleepytime Gal" (1942). Quite a few older re-issues mixed in with the newer material, like Monogram 'Bomba's' or 'Gene Autry' Columbia's.

    I remember that "The FBI" episode with Lynn Bari. Wasn't she playing a medium or a fortune-teller or something? Bari seemed to continue working, off and on, after her more high-profile days at Fox in the late-30s/40s. She was in an attempted B-film series at Fox that never quite took off, dubbed the 'Big Town Girls' I believe. Something like that. Bari and another Fox mainstay, June Lang, were teamed up in the first entry, entitled "Meet the Girls" (1938). I've had a lobby-card from it for decades, but have never seen the film. It sounds like good fun. There was a second film to the series, with Bari repeating her role, but her sidekick was replaced, and I'm guessing the whole notion of a continuing series just dissipated. Bari had a pretty solid career there for a while, but never really seemed to break into the front ranks. Reminds me a bit of Rochelle Hudson, who had a pretty consistent career as well, and like Bari, still kept appearing in things, here and there, for decades. Hudson had been a young starlet at RKO, but Fox signed her up and tried to promote her into the big leagues with the "Way Down East" (1935) remake, and she coasted along for a while. I like her in minor little comedy efforts such as "She Had to Eat" (1937). But like Bari, as Hudson aged into the 1940s, her roles and her appearances seemed to get a bit more hard-boiled.

    As for Mountie films, I really do think well of those Kermit Maynard efforts from Ambassador Pictures (1934-37). For independent, states-rights stuff, they really are some of the best of that lot. Primarily the earlier ones, from 1934-35, which are all Mountie items. Hard to recall which titles are the best, but I always remember a fondness for "Red Blood of Courage" (1935), albeit maybe for the addition of a young Ann Sheridan as leading lady. The later films switch away from the Northwest Mounted backdrop and turn into typical b-westerns, aren't nearly as impressive. I've always gotten a kick out of spotting Kermit Maynard in 1950s/60s tv-western shows, where he became a ridiculously prolific 'extra,' almost always appearing in background scenes as a townsman. You see him everywhere. Kermit was known to be a much more pleasant and good-natured joe than his erratic and irascible brother Ken (although Ken was the one with the definite charisma). However, there's an interestingly contrary anecdote given by Tris Coffin in an interview he gave in a 1977 issue of "Serial World." Coffin was in a Johnny Mack Brown movie at Monogram with Kermit, and Coffin says he was trying to get a few of the extras/actors together (including Kermit, who was hogging up too much space), so they would all appear within camera range for the next shot. And, without saying a word, Kermit came up and decked him. Probably some little festering back-story between the two that blew up. Guess we'll never know.
     
  9. Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    Another actor who appears as a background extra on TV shows is Tom Kennedy. Kennedy's specialty was the dim-plainclothes police detective, and he later played a lot of bartenders. Look for him in town and bar scenes on GUNSMOKE and RAWHIDE.

    Kennedy in the TORCHY series., with Glenda Farrell and Barton Maclane.
    tk.

    With Richard Martin and Tim Holt.
    tk2.
    (I notice the same group of extras appear in many episodes of PERRY MASON, THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E., and THE F.B.I.)

    Bert, Lynn Bari was in two, Season 3, episodes of THE F.B.I. In the one you remember, Bari operated a book and music shop, and was dressed as a sort of hippie momma, and she was playing a sitar. She did give off a fortune teller/ tarot reader vibe.

    I have read that Bari was the second biggest fan mail getter at Fox, and was a popular pinup, known as "The Woo Woo Girl".
    bla_lynn-bari.


    Interesting to see Roy's older movies were still making the rounds in 1951.
    I guess it was around that same time that all the pre-1948 Rogers were cut for TV syndication. Post 1948 movies released to TV would have required residual payments to the actors.
     
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  10. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Yeah, Tom Kennedy was certainly an omnipresent figure in films for decades, well into television. Specialized in dumb cops, but gradually began to be seen more often in bartender roles. Sort of like the way Dewey Robinson specialized in dumb thugs, but also gradually veered into bartender roles as he got older. As for Kennedy, I've always wanted to see a few more of those "Collins and Kennedy" comedy shorts that Columbia produced, around 1935-38 or so. I've only seen about three of them. But this was around the time the Columbia shorts were particularly well-made and produced (before 1940s-era budget cuts set in). Never really seen enough of the Collins-Kennedy stuff to really gauge how well they meshed as a comedy team. Columbia tried to similarly manufacture another comedy team a decade later, when they paired Eddie Quillan and Wally Vernon together. Of course, Wally Vernon also performed B-western sidekick duty for Don 'Red' Barry a few years earlier. Vernon, being more of an urban/northeastern, song-and-dance vaudevillian, hardly seems a 'natural' for the western genre, but I always liked him and found him sort of funny, in a bargain-basement comedy way.

    As for re-issues shown at my local neighborhood theater, here's a few examples that awaited the kids at the Saturday matinee crowd. I have tons more noted, but this is just a little overview. One point is that even though Roy Rogers' films ended in 1951, his older films were run almost constantly (one about every two or three months) from 1951-1957. So, it's certainly not like he immediately disappeared from theaters.

    (Jan. 1952): Sea Spoilers (1937) John Wayne
    (Sep. 1952): Kit Carson (1940) Jon Hall
    (Dec. 1952): Scatterbrain (1940) Judy Canova
    (Mar. 1953): Home in Oklahoma (1946) Roy Rogers
    (Jul. 1953): Daughter of the Jungle (1949) Lois Hall
    (Nov. 1954): Young Bill Hickok (1940) Roy Rogers
    (Mar. 1955): Don't Fence Me In (1945) Roy Rogers
    (Sep. 1955): Pardon My Sarong (1942) Abbott and Costello
    (Oct. 1955): Hands Across the Border (1944) Roy Rogers
    (Dec. 1955): Jesse James at Bay (1941) Roy Rogers
    (Apr. 1956): Hit the Road (1941) Universal, Dead End Kids
    (Jun. 1956): Sons of the Pioneers (1942) Roy Rogers
    (Mar 1957): Iron Mountain Trail (1953) Rex Allen
    (May 1958): Look Who's Laughing (1941) RKO comedy
    (Oct. 1958): Spooks Run Wild (1941) East Side Kids
    (Dec. 1958): Kid Dynamite (1943) East Side Kids
    (Feb. 1959): Susannah of the Mounties (1939) Shirley Temple
     
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  11. Message #411 of 454 Jan 12, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    I see from that list, that of the six Rogers movies, still going out to theaters, three of them are still around in uncut versions, HOME IN OKLAHOMA, DON'T FENCE ME IN, and HANDS ACROSS THE BORDER.

    Republic edited many of their pre-1948 movies for TV syndication down to 53 minutes or so. When MCA got the package at some point they were edited again to 51 minutes. Occasionally I've run into 54 minute versions, which may actually be some sort of film slowdown. The voices seem slower and deeper.

    I have to dig out Republic Confidential Vol. 1. There are some articles that talk of a pre-1948 and a post 1948 film packages. And a chart of the trimmed pre-1948 Roy Rogers movies. Roy was still the number one or two cowboy star in those theater owner polls well into the mid-50s.

    Bert, you mention more character actors whose names I can't match with faces.

    Monty Collins, I didn't know of at all.
    1409875588.
    3415255.
    midnight-blunders-us-poster-monte-collins-top-second-left-tom-kennedy-e5ngbe.
    Wally Vernon, I have heard of and recognized the face but didn't put them together.
    Wally Vernonbig.
    untitled.
    Eddie Quillan, I should have remembered his name, I just watched him in JUNGLE QUEEN, with Ruth Roman.
    14086926_1_l.
    sr54_junglequeen_ad.
    76456754_1024x1024.

    8720047.
    crabbin-in-the-cabin-top-from-left-dorothy-granger-lynne-lyons-wally-E5N92P.
    Now, Dewey Robinson. I didn't know his name either.
    Dewey Robinson in Roadblock (1951).
    But I remember noticing him, first, in SKY BANDITS-1940.
    MV5BMTA2NzczMWMtMThmMy00NWMxLWJjODgtM2IyZmJmMmJmZDc3XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMDMxMjQwMw@@._V1_.
     
  12. RBailey

    RBailey Second Unit

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    An excellent copy of the Columbia short pictured above, MIDNIGHT BLUNDERS with Monte Collins & Tom Kennedy is available on Sony's ICONS OF HORROR COLLECTION: SAM KATZMAN. This is one of the sets produced by one very own HTF poster "Cadavra". This standard DVD set is one of my favorites. It includes THE GIANT CLAW, CREATURE WITH THE ATOM BRAIN, THE WEREWOLF and ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU. Besides the Collins-Kennedy short, the set includes Chapter 2 of the Katzman-produced MYSTERIOUS ISLAND serial and a Mr. Magoo cartoon, TERROR FACES MAGOO. It's still available on Amazon and is highly recommended.
     
  13. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Yes, I recall one of those "Collins and Kennedy" shorts on that Katzman set. I seem to recall a "Smith and Dale" one on another set, maybe one of those 'Icons of Screwball Comedy' sets. I'd always figured Mike Schlesinger was responsible for these (as well as several other similar efforts), but didn't know with 100% certainty. We film buffs are really indebted to Mike for these things, and I hope he knows how much we appreciated them. Big time.
     
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  14. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    I always liked the "Jungle Queen" (1945-Univ) serial, with Ruth Roman (looking very pretty) roaming around the jungle foliage in what looks to be her nightie. A routine serial, but as I said, I liked it. I bought a copy of it on VHS. Then I bought a copy on DVD. And now it looks like I'm going to be buying it on 'blu' once VCI's (already delayed) release finally comes around. Lois Collier is another plus to the serial, by the way. I recall Eddie Quillan making an appearance at a screening at that Silent Movie Theater out in Hollywood not too long before he passed away. He seemed to have a good attitude about his career, and particularly proud of his work under contract to Cecil B. DeMille in the late-1920s. Sometimes TCM shows a few of those RKO-Pathe films he starred in, from the early-1930s. "The Tip-Off" (1931) seems to be the one that gets the most airplay (by far), owing to its leading lady being a young Ginger Rogers.

    That same year as "Jungle Queen," Eddie Quillan also appeared in another jungle serial, for competing Columbia studios, "Jungle Raiders" (1945) with Kane Richmond. I rather like this one, too. Maybe even more. It's chock full of villainy, all of whom meet pretty violent ends. When most people think of Columbia 'jungle' serials, they probably first think of "Congo Bill" (1948), thanks to its DC comics origin, as well as having Cleo Moore as the leading lady. Personally, I think I prefer "Raiders." One thing about "Congo Bill" is that everyone looks so sweaty and grimy, that after every chapter I watched, I felt like I needed to go take a shower.

    Honestly, though, I think I've liked just about every 'jungle' themed serial I've watched, from "Jungle Jim" (1937-Univ) to "King of the Congo" (1952-Col). I guess I'm just a sucker for them. I even like the rather notorious independent cheapie "Queen of the Jungle" (1935). Yes, it's an inept, threadbare bit of nonsense, shot on an absolute shoestring. And, almost all its adventure scenes are discordantly culled from stock-footage from the silent "Jungle Goddess" (1922) serial. Almost everyone refers to the 1935 "Queen" as the worst serial ever made, but I rather get a kick out of its home-movie level cheapness. And its heroine, played by Mary Kornman (formerly of Roach's silent 'Our Gang' and talkie 'Boy Friends' shorts), just acts her little heart out in it, as if vying for an Oscar. There's a cliffhanger ending in which some living vines have her trapped on the ground, strangling her. As the cliffhanger closes, she's contorting her face and emits a scream that devolves into an ugly gurgle. Not very ladylike. Not very dignified. But like I said, she's acting her dang little heart out, by gum. Actually, judging from that old silent footage, that 1922 "Jungle Goddess" looks like it must have been one amazing, eye-popping serial. Although I think a few small parts of the chapterplay survive, it's a huge shame we don't have it complete and available to see.
     
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  15. RBailey

    RBailey Second Unit

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    I'm with you on jungle serials. Heck, I even like Republic's rather threadbare JUNGLE DRUMS OF AFRICA. People are always saying it's Republic's worst serial but I enjoyed it. I mean it's got Clayton Moore & Phyllis Coates...c'mon.
    You are right about Mike Schlesinger and his work at Sony. I treasure those 'Icons' sets he worked on.
     
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  16. Message #416 of 454 Jan 13, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020
    Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    You guys are much more well-versed in classic serials than I, but a couple other "jungle" ones I have watched and enjoyed are The Phantom (1943, with Tom Tyler, who seems to be rescued twice every episode by his dog, Devil) and Jungle Girl (1941), with Frances Gifford.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    Jeff, everybody likes Frances Gifford.
    fab863dd349d4431e3a91b34753d268b--pin-up-girls-heroines.
    Even the Nazis in TARZAN TRIUMPHS-1943.
    Annex%20-%20Gifford,%20Frances%20(Tarzan%20Triumphs)_03.
    Annex-Weissmuller-Johnny-Tarzan-Triumphs_12.
    francesgifford15.
    frances-gifford-tarzan-triumphs-1943-rko-pictures-file-reference-32914-339tha-PMBT6M.
    I wonder if anyone ever confuses Frances Gifford with Francis Ford?
    z (1) .

    c5mevl1pbtnkro.
     
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  18. Message #418 of 454 Jan 15, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    THE CARSON CITY KID-1940, 57 minutes B&W. Only available in the 53:25 minute, or so, version. I have the edited version on a Mill Creek DVD set and no-name VHS.
    1940 carson city BIG.
    In KID, Roy plays a character with a character name and a secret identity. The story is set in the Old West. Republic remade it as IN OLD SACRAMENTO-1946, 89 minutes, B&W.

    how big.
    Roy's out to find the killer of his brother, and becomes an outlaw called 'The Carson City Kid', with Francis Macdonald as his partner.

    Francis Macdonald captured on a too white tinted Trigger.
    captured on trigger.
    Along the way, Roy encounters, gold miner Noah Beery, Jr., singer Pauline Moore, Lawman Gabby Hayes, gambler Bob Steele, and townsman Hal Taliaferro.

    02.
    post.
    Roy and Gabby are billed on a screen before the main title and Bob Steele is billed under the title. Just noticed they have Pauline Moore's name wrong in the above poster!

    big8.
    I guess because of the edits, Roy only sings one duet with Pauline Moore. Pauline Moore sings two other songs alone. The 1946 version has more musical numbers than KID.
    PDVD_042.JPG
    PDVD_043.JPG
    MOV_cde47e29_b.
    1940 Carson City Kid, The.
    IN OLD SACRAMENTO and THE CARSON CITY KID were both directed by Joe Kane. Kane is also credited with the story KID is based on. Frank Gruber adapted Kane's story, the KID's screenplay, another short story, and screenplay and came up with the script for IN OLD SACRAMENTO. So it's not a scene by scene redo, but has some of the same visual and story beats. The plot and dialog in both versions is above the usual and very entertaining, and worth seeking out.

    1.
    IN OLD SACRAMENTO was Wild Bill Elliott's first Republic big budget western after his 'Red Ryder' series.
    The 'Wild' was dropped from his billing for the remainder of his time at Republic. He became 'Wild Bill' again when he went to Monogram. The 'Wild' was dropped again when Elliott did his modern police detective five feature series.

    Elliott with Hank Daniels.
    3.
    The costars were, Constance Moore as the entertainer, Hank Daniels as the miner, Grant Withers as the gambler, Eugene Pallette as the lawman, Lionel Stander, Ruth Donnelly, Jack LaRue as the partner, and Hal Taliaferro, again, this time as a doctor.

    Constance Moore.
    2.
    1a.
    duke0611.
    Jack LaRue captured by Lionel Stander, Eugene Pallette, and Hal Taliaferro.
    68936645.

    Lionel Stander and Ruth Donnelly, on the right, provided added comedy.
    duke0510.
    91682893.

    It had an alternate title.
    inoldsacramento3.
    "Stick 'em up"!!!
    01.
     
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  19. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Oh yes, Jeff. Frances Gifford! Always a favorite of mine too! Super-popular with just about every serial buff. A lot of the old nostalgia conventions wanted her as a guest, but she wasn't really in shape for such things. She'd had a bad car wreck way back and suffered head injuries. I heard her memory was pretty shot and she tended to be in a fairly 'delicate' state later in life. But there was one event she did actually RSVP, which I was involved with, and I was very much hoping to at least meet her and say hello. But, she didn't attend after all.

    This event was a big Hollywood gala taking place at that LA event center near the tar-pits, whatever it's called. In the early-1990s, Turner had produced a documentary on the history of MGM studios, "When the Lion Roars." Before its televised debut, Turner organized a big fancy event, and invited all the contract actors still around, to the party. It seemed like nearly a hundred old-time guest celebrities attended. I was there, as a lowly flunky. A lowly contractee. My task was to be by the front desk as the guests arrived, and check off them off from a list. This was so the emcee of the event could call out the names of the celebs so they could each stand and take a bow during the proceedings. It was a little bit of a harrowing chore, as there were times a whole slew of guests swarmed in at the same time. I remember Marie Windsor, Frances Rafferty, Martha Scott, Cecilia Parker, and a few others all arriving bunched together, and I was so afraid I was going to miss checking someone off. It was mostly old-timers at the event, although there were a few young'uns like Anne Francis and Stuart Whitman.

    After all the attendees had arrived at the front desk, I decided to walk in and join the event and subsequent buffet myself. I probably wasn't supposed to, owing to my lowly status, but nobody said I couldn't, so what the heck? How often do you get to hobnob with old-time movie stars at a fancy-schmancy Hollywood gala? I had a badge, and was properly attired. Got to meet and chat with a lot of folks... Lew Ayres, Kathryn Grayson, Signe Hasso, Evelyn Keyes, etc. In a corner, I saw Anita Page sitting by herself, wide-eyed and happily looking at the procession of people walking by, yet also seeming a bit lonely. I thought I'd go over to her and bring up "Jungle Bride" (1933) to her, and see if I could dredge up a few memories and anecdotes about the production. But before I could do this, I was tapped for another little chore. Maureen O'Sullivan and Luise Rainer had met up with each other for the first time in decades, and were ecstatically waxing nostalgic, and they'd decided to leave the event together, to extend their visit. I escorted them down the long hall to their waiting limo, getting a kick out of listening to them chirp away about their memories of long ago. When I got back to check on Anita Page, she was gone.

    Hated that I missed out on both her and Frances Gifford. Anyway, enough silly reminiscing! Better to just sit back and thank Bob for finding and posting all this great imagery! Old movies are so much doggoned fun! There's always so much stuff to discover and re-discover. Been a film buff for over four decades, but my enthusiasm for it all not only never seems to wane, but grows.
     
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  20. Message #420 of 454 Jan 16, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
    Flashgear

    Flashgear Screenwriter

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    Bert, your "silly reminiscing" is a treasure of delight for us all here. Your scholarly knowledge and evocative love for old time cinema makes my heart soar in the reading of it, a privilege I am deeply grateful for. Your reverential respect for these bygone stars and supporting players is so indicative of your life's passion in discovery. Thanks to you, I have a lengthy list of titles previously obscure to me that I'm trying to track down on disc, Youtube, streaming or TCM.

    I can also say the same about our leader here, wonderful Bob Gudera, for finding all these fascinating and delightful pictures and info...and to other great members here like John (RBailey), Jeff and Gary OS among others...

    My own contribution here is more modest, but I hope continues to be of interest...more movie pages from my hometown newspaper featuring Roy's movies as they first appeared onscreen in my old dusty cowtown...these theaters were within a mile of huge stockyards that once existed alongside oil refineries, rail yards and heavy industry...in a far more earthy, genuine and humble city... row upon row of tidy, little and much loved homes full of baby boom children, doting and self sacrificing mothers, stolid and stoic fathers and war veterans...beautiful churches and public parks in a lovely river valley...and we also had our quota of the usual denizens of the dark side, as I don't want to pretend it was utopia...but for a kid like me back then, it felt like a comforting oasis that I could only grow to appreciate as it was transformed (and not in a good way) over the next 60+ years...a familiar story for a lot of us, I'm sure...

    Heart of the Rockies...Sept. 29 1951...
    Roy Rogers 1.JPG

    Click on image to enlarge...
    Roy Rogers 2.JPG

    South of Caliente, Aug. 30 1952...
    Roy Rogers 5 Aug. 30 1952.JPG

    Click to enlarge...I have most of these movies on DVD, and The African Queen on Blu...a lot of Roy's movies were on a double bill with a Bowery Boys lead-in...I'd want to see both double bills at the good ol' Variety theater (which I do remember), and the Westerns only Hitchin' Post...which was demolished when I was only 3...
    Roy Rogers 6 Aug. 30 1952.JPG

    Son of Paleface, Sept. 6 1952...
    Roy Rogers 3 Sept.6 1952.JPG

    August 30 1952 and the end of summer holidays for the kids, who had all the public swimming pools closed all summer long because of a Polio scare...the public health officer and a panel of doctors delayed the start of school that year, and 1953 too...Click to enlarge...
    Roy Rogers 4 Sept.6 1952.JPG

    I have nearly all of these on disc...Atomic City on Blu from Olive, Son of Paleface on Blu from KL, and The World in his Arms on DVD...
    Roy Rogers 8 Aug. 30 1952.JPG

    Roy Rogers 7 Aug. 30 1952.JPG

    Not a Roy item, but I'm sure you guys will appreciate this find also...Gene Autry and Champion in person at the Stampede Corral! Oct. 1 1951...With Little Champ, Smiley Burnette, Pat Buttram, Cass County Boys, Jemez Indians from N.M., and the Melody Ranch Stars! Prime seating at $2.20...kids at half price...some guy named Nelson Eddy is playing the same joint two weeks later...
    Gene Autry.JPG
    Gene Autry 1.JPG
     
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