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Roy Rogers in TruColor and Uncut

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Richard--W, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. Vic Pardo

    Vic Pardo Screenwriter

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    Brian Camp
    Peggy Stewart, at 95, is still with us. Her last TV credit is from 2014 and her last film credit is from 2012.
     
  2. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    There's a nice little book on Peggy Stewart called "Peggy Stewart: Princess of the Prairie," written by Bob Carman and Dan Scapperotti. I don't know if it's still in print, though. I picked up a copy at the Gene Autry museum in Oklahoma shortly after it came out. I hope Stewart is doing well. I knew she took a pretty bad fall (broken hip?) about three years ago. She'd still been going strong, continuing with acting bits up to that point, amazingly enough. One of our last living links to that 1940s Republic era, and always a welcome presence in films. There was something about her personality and demeanor that really 'fit' in with the western genre, more than just about any other b-western leading lady.
     
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  3. Message #283 of 291 Feb 9, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    MY PAL TRIGGER-1946, B&W 79 minutes.
    bh%20(8).
    Available from various sources with full length run time close enough, at 78:50 minutes. I have three versions. The Republic Home Video 1992 VHS is the best looking and along with the Sinister Cinema DVD-R is the most complete. The night scenes are too dark in spots but less so on the RHV VHS. Both have the Republic Eagle logo at the beginning and end of the movie along, with the proper music playing over them as it blends into the main title theme and end title logo. My third version from the Millcreek/Treeline 50 Classic Western DVD set does not have either logo. All three are missing the theatrical release title card, and have a still of the syndicated title card.
    MY PAL TRIGGER Syndicated title card:
    credits%20(1).
    Theatrical example title card from HELDORADO:
    would not imbed in post .
    Note: In Post #265 the YouTube HELDORADO has a syndicated title card, and so does the Roan DVD.

    This is the first Rogers movie that replaced the Republic Independence Hall bell tower logo with the Republic Eagle.
    41kG+F1YasL._AC_US327_QL65_.

    19%20bb.
    ballerina.
    Roy is a horse trader who has a mare he wants to breed with Gabby's palomino stallion, 'The Golden Sovereign'. I think 'The Sovereign' is really Trigger playing his father. Dale is Gabby's daughter. Gabby does not want anything to do with Roy or his mare.

    00%20bh.
    Leroy Mason, Roy Barcroft, and their boss, Jack Holt steal 'The Sovereign', but he gets away from them and has a dalliance with Roy's mare.
    18c33b57d6cc375f6fa1fc8406f53a36.
    Holt, accidentally, kills 'The Golden Sovereign'. Roy is blamed and is on the run with his pregnant mare.
    my-pal-trigger.
    Roy fights his way into a barn to shelter his mare during a storm.
    Fred Graham, Ted Mapes, and Paul E. Burns:
    s-l1000.
    Paul E. Burns played old coots in lots of westerns, including SON OF PALEFACE.
    2394-17828.

    I am concerned about Roy's behavior in this one. He commits a half dozen assaults, plus numerous trespassing, bail jumping, property destruction, and interstate flight to avoid prosecution. And the Pioneers intimidate a confession out of Holt's henchmen. If prosecuted, I think, Roy would still be in prison.
    20%20bh.
    Trigger is born. Roy tries to give Trigger to Gabby to make amends. Gabby sends them away.
    13b%201427-57%20bb.
    maxresdefault.
    So, Roy being Roy, everybody forgives him and he goes to work for Holt, who has acquired Trigger from a public auction to pay Roy's bail debt.
    23.
    35%20JACK%20HOLT.
    Gabby has bet his ranch with Holt in a horse race, with Roy riding Trigger for Holt and Dale riding her horse 'The Golden Empress'. What will Roy do?
    25%20ccc.
    17_1946 My Pal Trigger (Gabby) F.
    My%20Pal%20Trigger.

    YouTube: MY PAL TRIGGER no logos, no proper title card but otherwise complete:


    roy-rogers-and-trigger.
     
  4. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    I recognize that familiar face of bit-player and character actor Paul E. Burns, but I never knew his name. Even with my brain stuffed with the ridiculous minutia of hundreds upon hundreds of faces and names of old-time character actors, I still find myself amazed at how many I've yet managed to commit to memory. The other day I was watching "Hell's Outpost" (1954-Republic) with Rod Cameron and Joan Leslie, and spotted an old codger I've seen a million times... a guy that specialized in playing crooked lawyers, crooked businessmen, and just about any kind of specialist in underhanded activity. I'm referring to Taylor Holmes.

    Looking him up at the Imdb, I find he had quite an illustrious stage career, making his Broadway debut in the year 1900. But what surprised me most was to learn that he was the father of young actor Phillips Holmes, who starred in a lot of Paramount films in the early-talkie era. I've long been familiar with the younger Holmes, going back to late-shows I saw when still in high school, of films like "Broken Lullaby" (1932) and "Great Expectations" (1934), and several others. Never would have guessed a connection between the two actors.

    Anyway, it's sometimes fascinating to check on these old-time actors, and learn of their histories, which often dated back to medicine-shows, touring companies, 10-20-30 melodramas, and the very dawn of moving pictures.
     
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  5. Message #285 of 291 Feb 16, 2019 at 6:48 AM
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2019 at 6:53 AM
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    Learning the name of a 'new' very visible character actor or stunt man is fun. It's funny how sometimes I wonder why I don't learn the names of certain actors, but remember, somehow, that John Merton and Lane Bradford are father and son.
    John Merton and Lane Bradford:
    5pa73mY3fJTuJUPVng4neXJz2gr.
    lane-bradford.

    I learned both Ted Mapes and Paul E. Burns as I watched MY PAL TRIGGER, because their character names were clearly stated and I looked them up at IMDB.

    My problem with Burns was that I confused him with Emmett Lynn. Yet looking at them side by side they don't facially resemble each other that much.

    Lynn with Tim Holt and Burns with Henry Fonda in THE OXBOW INCIDENT:

    5578-2.
    bottemp1-1815.

    Another one I have noticed is Bill Foster aka Bill Coontz, a background gang or posse member in tons of 50s and 60s westerns, whose name I learned when he had a speaking part in a REBEL episode. He is pretty much in every episode of WYATT EARP.
    bc.


    I recognize Taylor Holmes from RIDE THE MAN DOWN and GENTLEMAN PREFER BLONDES, but didn't know his name. Just saw his daughter, the severe looking Madeleine Taylor Holmes, in the Disney Zorro series playing the wife of another character actor whose name I don't always remember, Jan Arvan.

    Taylor Holmes in GENTLEMAN PREFER BLONDES-1953:
    006 Taylor Holmes as Mr. Esmond Sr.  M00136.
    With Barbara Bates in QUICKSAND-1950:
    82fe13f3e13b2ee700e54b57413bc1e6.
    TOBAR THE GREAT-1954:
    Tobor_The_Great_Kino_Lorber_Studio_Classics_-_High-Def_Digest_Blu-ray_Review_3.
    Daughter Madeleine in Zorro-1957:
    d.

    Jan Arvan with Madeleine and Eugenia Paul ZORRO-1957:
    zor-1121.

    Hey, where's Roy???
    Trigger kissing Roy Rogers.
     
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  6. Message #286 of 291 Feb 17, 2019 at 12:52 PM
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019 at 3:09 PM
    Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    As grizzled sidekicks and bit-players go, Emmett 'Pappy' Lynn was sometimes a bit too broad, too seedy for my tastes. I occasionally think there might be a fine line between genial old cusses like Gabby Hayes, Eddy Waller, and even Fuzzy St. John, who seem house-broken and family-friendly, and those like Lynn, Britt Wood, William Fawcett and such, who veer over a tad into skid-row bum territory. Grizzled is fine. Hillbilly-ish is fine. But as a cowboy hero, you really wouldn't want a sidekick that seems to be in too dire a need of fumigation, I would think.

    Although still nothing new on Roy Rogers, there's a bit of exciting news (at least to me, if no one else) on the B-western front, as VCI is coming out with two of Buck Jones' serials for Universal, "The Red Rider" (1934) and "The Roaring West" (1935), on dvd in May. That first one is probably my favorite western serial, as it has a lot of good dialogue and character touches. Much better than the typical western serial. Good villainy from Walter Miller, appealing leading lady in Marion Shilling, and an absolute plum role for western perennial Edmund Cobb as sort of a sidekick. Hope VCI has located a good print, as it's always been one that has only circulated in so-so quality. The later serial from 1935 isn't quite as good, as I recall, but it does offer the very attractive Muriel Evans opposite Jones. Evans had also appeared in several of Jones' features as well.

    If this wasn't enough, VCI also has scheduled the wacky but hugely fun sci-fi serial "The Vanishing Shadow" (1934-Universal) to come out on blu in June, apparently sourced from 35mm. Invisibility belt, ray guns, mad scientist, and even a rampaging robot. I love this one. It's a real blast. Walter Miller again provides villainy, this time against hero Onslow Stevens.
     
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  7. RBailey

    RBailey Second Unit

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    Plus both "The Red Rider" and "The Vanishing Shadow" feature the great Richard Cramer in supporting roles. That's Cramer in my avatar as Joe Portos in the Buck Jones serial. Cramer, however steals the show in "The Vanishing Shadow" as Walter Miller's chief goon, Dorgon. His line readings always cracks me up.
     
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  8. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Gosh, I didn't realize that was Cramer in your avatar, until I looked close-up at it. Cramer is great in "Vanishing Shadow." I think (like many people) I first became aware of Cramer from the Laurel and Hardy short "Scram!" where he portrays the intensely humorless judge who goes home to find vagrants L&H in pajamas, seemingly cavorting with his inebriated wife, giving them a long, deadly stare.
     
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  9. Tony Bensley

    Tony Bensley Producer

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    For me, it was my mid '70s inaugural SAPS AT SEA (1940) viewing that acquainted me with Richard (Sometimes spelled Rychard!) Cramer, as the nasty escaped murderer Nick Granger, along with his pal, "Nick, Jr."

    It wasn't until many decades later that I saw Richard Cramer as the Judge with a menacing stare in that hilarious gem SCRAM! (1932), but I'm seriously digressing.

    CHEERS! :)
     
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  10. Message #290 of 291 Feb 18, 2019 at 8:26 AM
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019 at 8:33 AM
    Bob Gu

    Bob Gu Screenwriter

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    Digressing is welcome.

    Looking forward to all those serials coming out.

    I have never contemplated the bathing habits of cowboy sidekicks. Herds of horses and cows are stinky, too. I enjoy Britt Wood, as 'Speedy', with Hoppy, especially in STAGECOACH WARS.

    c9e6a4b44eb9257729d059c6e35ea33f--vintage-movie-posters-film-posters.
    Richard Cramer is a new one for me. After looking him up, at IMDB, and seeing his pictures, I still don't remember him! But I see he is in many movies in my collection.

    Richard Cramer, with hairpiece?
    cd.

    R.C. with Cliff, 'Jiminy Cricket', Edwards and Tim Holt.
    dc.

    Cramer was even a Mountie, with W.C. Fields!!
    mounte.
     
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  11. Message #291 of 291 Feb 18, 2019 at 12:11 PM
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019 at 11:35 PM
    Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    Oh, I liked Britt Wood and his comedic line delivery in his Hoppy films. His later film appearances, as he settled into a lot of bit parts, he could get a bit seedy at times. But anyway, I'm really looking forward to the Buck Jones serials. Jones has always been a big favorite of mine, and I've caught most of his extant films. About a year ago, a friend sent me a copy of one of the few films I hadn't seen, "Desert Vengeance" (1931-Columbia), and it was quite a gem. The film opens with Buck traveling on an ocean liner, and trying to help out some young guy who has lost a fortune gambling, and is contemplating suicide. Buck fails to prevent this, and feels obligated to tell his sister, who is waiting for him at the docks. Romance ensues. But it turns out the girl is hiding something. And to the viewer's surprise, so is Buck. And before long, we're in a desert ghost-town, with a stark tale of revenge, mental cruelty, survival, religious regeneration, and of two warring outlaw gangs. Not to mention a grim, violent finale that has a wounded, dazed Buck walking down a dusty, quiet ghost-town street that is littered with bodies after a huge shootout. Darn neat film.

    Buck Jones did seem to alternate between making grim, gritty westerns, and more lighthearted comical ones. He was good in both. Plus, a unique feature of many (especially the early Universals) is how the female roles are larger and more solidly developed than found in the usual b-western genre. A good case in point is "Silver Spurs" (1936), which I always found rather fascinating. It's probably a bit too leisurely-paced for a lot of western buffs, and the finale is somewhat banal and underwhelming. Yet the milieu it presents, and how it captures the pulp-western romanticism of its time is rather memorable. Lots of intriguing little touches, like the long, nearly ten-minute opening in which leading lady Muriel Evans arrives at the depot and is awaiting her ride home, interrupted by robbery and murder... with the action shown offscreen. Or, the nifty scene up in the hills, when Buck is staring at Muriel, who stands tall on a high rock with outstretched arms, drinking in the beauty of the landscape, and Buck shyly turning around, somewhat embarrassed by his burgeoning love for her. Subtle, but amazing stuff for a little b-western.

    Actually, I first saw "Silver Spurs" (1936) at a screening at one of the Cinecon conventions, back around 1990 or 1991. I remember I went early to get a good seat for the screening. A short while later, an older couple arrived and seated themselves in the two seats next to mine. I nodded and chit-chatted with them a little. Then, the film was shown, and after the lights came back on, an announcer at the podium said that leading lady Muriel Evans was present for the showing, and asked her to take a bow. Turned out to be the older lady that I'd been sitting by. I had no idea that was who she was. I had no idea she was going to even be there. In fact, I didn't even know she was still alive! Then, there was also a screening of a Charley Chase comedy, "His Silent Racket" (1933), which also featured Miss Evans. Besides her active b-western career, she was also leading lady in a fair number of Chase's comedies for Hal Roach. That short also featured Anita Garvin, too, and she was also there for the screening. The two ladies then took questions afterwards, in a panel discussion.

    Ah well, enough reminiscing! I just wish we had all these things from the Rogers/Jones/etc. b-westerns, to the serials, to comedy shorts, to early filmed-tv fare, etc., in decent viewing quality. So much of this, we really have to struggle through some awfully rough print quality just to watch.
     
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