Router, switch, or hub?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JohnMM, Jun 5, 2002.

  1. JohnMM

    JohnMM Stunt Coordinator

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    I want to get cable internet. I would like to "share" the connection between 3 computers in the house, but want to have only one cable modem. Would I use a router, switch, or hub to do this? Is there an advantage of one over the others?

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Shayne Lebrun

    Shayne Lebrun Screenwriter

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    You would use a router. The advantage of this over the others is that what you want to do is what a router does.

    I'd suggest one of the Linksys series, personally.
     
  3. Andre F

    Andre F Screenwriter

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    I agree with Shayne. I've had my Linsys CableDSL Router for over a year and it works great!
    -Andre F
     
  4. Patrick_S

    Patrick_S Producer

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  5. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

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    I'm not a fan of Linksys products (I've seen too many die), but SMC makes a great broadband router. It's got the router piece, but also is a 4 or 8 port switch, a wireless access point, and a print server. My mother-in-law has one, as do a few coworkers of mine. If I had to replace my equipment (currently a netgear router and an apple airport basestation), I'd get the SMC. Model #SMC7004AWBR (or SMC7008AWBR for the 8 port switch)
     
  6. Westly T

    Westly T Second Unit

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    I've had a Netgear router for years with no problems, but I wanted wireless. My Netgear router is now on ebay (Currently $39) and I got a D-link wireless router, print server, Ethernet switch, etc for $107.97 after rebate. Works great! I've setup 5 of the D-link Di-713P routers for people at work (2 on PB DSL, 1 on adelpha cable, 2 on Cox cable) and they all work perfectly! See my post in Coupons and Bargains on how to get this price. One nice thing about these is you can connect a printer to it's bi-directional port and print from any PC without setting up printer sharing or having to have other PC's on to print. I've not heard anything bad about the Linksys router, but I've had lots of problems with their Ethernet switches not being compatible with the switches at work and some LAN cards so I avoid all of their products.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Nick So
    Can you also use a router as a server for a LAN? So we can not only share internet connections but also share files/printers over a LAN?
     
  8. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    I'll explain the terminology a bit here.

    A hub is dumb. A switch is smarter. And a router is smartest.

    A hub shares its' available bandwidth between all of its connections. So if you have 4 pairs of computers transferring stuff on a 8 port 100Mbit hub then each pair of computers will have 25Mbit of bandwidth. If it is duplexed then instead of the two computers in each pair sharing 25Mbit they each have 25Mbit in their direction. Also a hub has no routing abilities. When connected to a cable modem with IP addresses assigned to your computers, if you try and transfer a file over IP the info will head out the cable modem and eventually get routed back (essentially limiting your transfer to your cable services upload speed). [This isn't the case if you are using a computer as a proxy or router (or the hub is part of a router), only if you have multiple IPs from your cable/dsl provider].

    A switch doesn't share its' bandwitch between connections. Its' backbone is fast enough to allow every connection between two ports the speed rating of the switch. Again if duplexed, then the full speed in both directions. But a switch is also smart enough to know if a particular IP is connected to it. So with a switch if you transfer a file over IP it won't get sent out your cable modem and back.

    Now what the Linksys and the like routers are doing is adding some extra functionality to the switch (although some add this functionality to hubs, but I would strongly recommend getting the switch over the hub, especially considering the cost difference nowadays). The ability to multiplex and demultiplex. Ie convert multiple internal IP addresses into a single external IP address. And then when the requested info comes back to the single IP address it figures out which of the multiple internal IP addresses the info is supposed to go to.

    There is a bunch of other stuff the router can do, mainly firewall type stuff, limiting ports and such, but that's the jist of it.
     
  9. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Nick, all the cable/dsl routers available have either a hub or a switch in them. The router won't act as a file server, but it will allow you to transfer files between the computers on your network.
     
  10. JohnMM

    JohnMM Stunt Coordinator

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    I'll be router shopping shortly. Thank you all very much for the education!!!
     

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