Router Static IP Config

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Adam Sanchez, Nov 13, 2005.

  1. Adam Sanchez

    Adam Sanchez Supporting Actor

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    Hey all,

    I'm looking for a "How-to" kind of guide, so hopefully someone will know a link for one.

    I have a Linksys Wireless G Router and I basically want to set my 3 computers up for static IP's, rather than it assigning them automatically, and therefore randomly. I have alot of port forwarding going on for one computer, but not the other two. But since the router gives different IPs depending on which computer is turned on 1st, 2nd, etc, the port forwarding doesn't always match. Right now I just have the port's forward to all 192.168 IP options my 3 computers can get.. but I rather have them set with static. If that is possible that is.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Patrick_S

    Patrick_S Producer

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    Your manual for the router will cover assigning a static IP address. If you don't have it anymore just go to Linksys's web site and download a copy.

    Basically all you need to do is assign static IP addresses to the MAC addresses of the network cards.
     
  3. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    You set up static IP's at the individual PC's, not the router. You'll have to go into the TCP/IP properties for the active network connection and set up the static IP there. The only setting in your router you can change is to disable the DHCP server. That just keeps the router from handing out an IP if one is requested, but you still have to make the changes from Windows.

    If you need a step by step, try http://www.hotcomm.com/FAQ/FAQ_staticIPXP.asp
     
  4. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    Most routers support having the dhcp server reserve ip's for particular mac addresses, this may be the easier and prefered method for setting up your network if you have the occasional friend come and hook up a laptop to mooch net or if you only want to work on one piece of your network instead of everything.
     
  5. Adam Sanchez

    Adam Sanchez Supporting Actor

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    Rob, could you explain more how to do this option? Basically only one of my computers I want to be assigned the same IP so I can set the ports easier. The other 2 computers don't matter as much.
     
  6. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

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    It will really depend on the router as to whether or not you can do this and in which menu you can access this feature.

    But basically, you are looking for somewhere that it will accept an input of an IP address and a MAC address. The MAC address is a unique identifier for every network card. What you are telling the dhcp server is that whenever that unique mac address goes onto the network the dhcp server will assign it that ip adrress. Any other computer that accesses the network will be assigned a random ip (no garuntee on it being the same).
     
  7. StevenFC

    StevenFC Second Unit

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    Should be as simple as setting up port forwarding on your router, setting up your computers for static IP, and disabling DHCP on your router. Pretty much what the other guys have said in other words. But it's my bedtime and I'm sleepy--so I could be missing something [​IMG]
     
  8. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    You can also just use a static IP for one of the computers and leave DHCP running. You can usually set a range for the DHCP address (e.g. 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.15). Set that range, and then make sure your static IP is outside of that range (e.g. 192.168.1.25). That will ensure that you don't run into conflicts with multiple computers having the same IP.
     
  9. Francois Caron

    Francois Caron Cinematographer

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    I had two Linksys routers up to now, one wired and the other wireless. By default, the DHCP server on both of them would assign IP addresses starting at xxx.xxx.xxx.100. So basically, you should be able to configure your PCs to use any address below 100, as long as it doesn't match the router's own address.

    The important thing is to make sure the first three series of numbers are all exactly the same throughout your network. Also, don't just pick any first three series of numbers out of your head. Stick with the starting address 192.168.xxx.xxx so that your equipment doesn't conflict with any existing addresses on the Internet. Addresses starting with 192.168 are reserved for internal networks and are not used on the Internet itself.

    Other useful info: the subnet mask is always 255.255.255.0, and both the default gateway and the nameserver should point to the router's own TCP/IP address.
     

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