Rotary cutting tool for cutouts

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bob Bartlett, Jun 25, 2002.

  1. Bob Bartlett

    Bob Bartlett Stunt Coordinator

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    Sears has one of their own also there is the rotozip. They come with a circle cutter and a plunge base, but has anyone used them to cut out tweeter and driver holes? The one at sears was 60 bucks, so they are fairly inexpensive.
     
  2. Arthur_King

    Arthur_King Stunt Coordinator

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    Heh, well, I cant vouch for the ability of those types of units to really do the job without burning out or breaking... But...
    Im REALLY tempted to get like 4 of these and then if they burn out, well... big deal.
    Daffy Arthur King
    With the brain of a duck
     
  3. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    It will take you a very long time to get through 3/4" MDF, and probably several bits, but I imagine it will work. If you plan on doing many projects, a powerful plunge router and circle jig is a must.
     
  4. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    For $15 more you can get a 1.5HP Skil or Black & Decker model. These will work for the occasional cut. If you are planing on using the router a lot, get a good one (3.25 HP Dewalt, Porter Cable or Hitachi).
     
  5. Mark_E_Smith

    Mark_E_Smith Second Unit

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    Well Im in the middle of a center channel project that uses Audax HM170C0 6.5 inch drivers (square with rounded points) and a Hi-Vi RT2C I looked at the rotozip tools and im glad I stayed away from them. get a skill or some lower line Plunge router BUT MAKE SURE IT CAN USE PORTER CABLE GUIDE BUSINGS. I bought a Jasper circle cutting jig and that was a good investment, the guide bushings will let you make templates (for odd shaped things and port openings)out of 1/4 cheap mdf or masonite and you will make perfect circles with the jasper jig. you will need a 1/4 CARBIDE bit that will cut 3/4 or better and cut in 3 or 4 steps.
     
  6. alan fallert

    alan fallert Agent

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    I need to buy a router to cut out end caps out of mdf, can I get by on a regular router or is a plunge router the way to go. And if I need to get a plunge router, will it do everything a regular router will do.Id hate to buy a plunge router for just a sonotube project and cant use it for any other woodworking projectes. And what bit should I go with to cut through the mdf for the endcaps? And where can I buy a circle jig? thank you.
     
  7. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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    I agree that a router is a better way to go but a rotozip is not as bad as people say. I've cut through A LOT of MDF with a single (yes, just one) bit. It does take a little bit longer but only because I was having to trace the lines. With a guide like Bob mentioned it would probably work well. If money is really tight then for $60 it's not bad. Cost being no object though I would get a router simply because it can do so much more, IMO.


    Regards,

    Dan Hine
     
  8. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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  9. David A. Frattaroli

    David A. Frattaroli Stunt Coordinator

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    I've used a Rotozip before and think they stink for MDF. I found that the circle jig had way too much play as well. You need a 1.5HP (or more) router. As far as plunge or fixed base is concerned, plunge is nice but not necessary since you never want to cut through 3/4" MDF in one pass anyway. So, you can get away with a fixed base router and lowering the bit a little at a time.

    I have a 1.5HP Porter Cable 693. It came with both a fixed and plunge base and an edge guide. I got it at Amazon for $179 and no shipping. It's simply a woodworker's MUST HAVE router.
     
  10. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    alan,
    for starters try a 1/4" spiral upcut bit. it looks like a stubby drill bit. all i have ever seen are made of carbide.
    other starter bits you can get real use of are 3/8", 1/2", 3/4" roundovers, a flush trim bit, 1/4" and/or 1/2" straight bits.
    i buy bits with removable bearings and try to get double fluted straights. spend the extra money and get carbide. just forget that HSS (high speed steel) even exsists.
    one place for sure to get the jasper is at partsexpress.
     
  11. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    I recently learned that my father had an old Sears fixed base router that had been collecting dust for years. Its now in my possession as a long-term loan.

    I've considered buying/making a circle jig but I wonder how difficult it is to start the cut with a fixed base router. I'm guessing the preferred method is to align the jig so that the router bit is against the side of the wood so that it will immediately start to cut in once you start the rotation. Is this right? Is it difficult to get a perfect circle - without a flat spot where you started the cut? I can't imagine trying to manually plunge a fixed-base router into the wood.

    Also, my first few attempts at roundovers were ... less than perfect. I need more practice but I was wondering if a router table would make roundovers significantly easier (for straight wood obviously, not round endcaps).
     
  12. David A. Frattaroli

    David A. Frattaroli Stunt Coordinator

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    Ryan, you're going to be cutting driver holes in your baffle by making multiple light passes. So, a fixed base router will allow you to drop the bit into the work piece without disrupting the perfect circle. I've done it. It works fine. Remember, you should be cutting away about 1/8" of inch of material at a time.

    Good luck.
     
  13. Alexis

    Alexis Stunt Coordinator

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    I used a dewalt rotary tool to try to cut some regular 1 inch particle board, and the bit started smoking only after a few inches of cutting.
     
  14. alan fallert

    alan fallert Agent

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    Thanks guys for your replys,can you describe how the best way to cut the end caps to my 24 inch sono tube. Do I just get a circle jig and my router and start out with maybe a 26inch piece of mdf and drill a hole in the middle of it and start my cut, or do I have to start on the edge of the mdf and start my cut, please help me out here im not into woodworking at all.
     
  15. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Alan, go to any of my "Sunosub" link in my signature below, your questions will be answered with photos!
     
  16. alan fallert

    alan fallert Agent

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    Hi Pat, looks like you started on the outside of the mdf by the pictures on you sono2 project, This is the exact sub I am going to try to build, The sono tube is here, I need to get my router and Im going to try that spiral upcut bit.I might need some of your help on this project. YOU did well with all of those pictures. Wife will probably hate it but she will get over it. What will this sono tube with the tempest driver and a 250 watt plat amp compare to lets say the sunfire signiture, which would win out. thank you
     
  17. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Alan,
    That's easy! The Tempest will make the Sunfire look like a firecracker! [​IMG]
    Brian
     
  18. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    It depends on how large the piece of MDF is, but I just happened to choose to use the entire width of the panel for the endcap diameter. But if the panel is larger than the design for the endcap diameter, you still just plop the router bit into the MDF and just spin the router via the circle jig (start with 1/4" to 1/3" cutting depth) and make multiple passes around and around.

    Honestly, never heard a Sunfire, so I can't offer any qualitiative comparisons, but I'm fairly confident you won't be disappointed with the Tempest sonosub.
     

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