room equalization?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Brad Russell, Oct 1, 2003.

  1. Brad Russell

    Brad Russell Stunt Coordinator

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    What is the general consensus about room equalization? It seems to me with all of the micro processing these days it should be pretty easy to have a RTA/Analyzer that could give anyone a ruler flat room.

    Brad
     
  2. Ron L

    Ron L Auditioning

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    Brad

    If you are looking at spending money to improve the sound in your room, then the first thing you should be concerned about is the first reflections off the walls. If the wife factor isn't too great , the ceiling is a good idea too. Acoustic foam or wall boards work best. Heavy pleated curtans on any windows is good too. This will really clear up the high frequencies and improve the clarity of singing and dialogue.
    After that you are looking at correcting for room resonance issues which are based on the size of your room vs. your listening position. Stuffed furnature helps as does carefull location of the sub. Further into the room for the sub is usualy better. Base is one area where a notch filter will really help.
    The last upgrade I did on the software for my Anthem (v-2.1), added a notch fiter with adjustable depth and width. It really helped tame the excessive boom in the room.

    Ron
     
  3. Brad Russell

    Brad Russell Stunt Coordinator

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    Ron,
    Thanks for the reply. I understand that you can do all the accoustical stuff. I'm wondering though, couldn't a computer controled eq be able to adjust every channel to give flat room response? It seems like the accoustical stuff is so much trial & error. And as you mentioned could be a real help to WAF!
     
  4. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    Cees Alons
    It's a debate that will go on for a long time. First: it will be very difficult (even if you can measure very accurately) to really make a room totally "flat", audiowise.

    But here's the big question: what do you want to achieve? Should the audio sound as if it was really made in your room, or should your room sound as if it were really the original sound-stage (concert-hall, or studio, or street, or room, or whatever)?

    Cees
     
  5. Brad Russell

    Brad Russell Stunt Coordinator

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    I know that it is impossible to have it sound just as the sound engineer heard it. But it seems that one would want a reasonably flat response. I guess I'd rather hear the music as it was intended (or as close to it as possible) rather than through the "ears" of my room.

    Brad
     
  6. Marty Neudel

    Marty Neudel Stunt Coordinator

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    Brad,

    it's imprtant to note that room equalizaation only works for the sweet spot, where the microphone was placed. If you use multiple location mikes (ala Lexicon) the sound will not appear quite so well-balanced from your favorite chair. It is also a sad fact that, while you are creating a sweet spot where all sounds well, you are also creating sour spots where the sound will be worse than before the equalization.
    Marty
     

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