Room Acoustics Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Michael_V, Jan 18, 2003.

  1. Michael_V

    Michael_V Second Unit

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    We recently moved into overseas military housing built of concrete blocks and designed for one purpose: to withstand typhoon force winds. With smooth, cement walls and hard, tile floors, it is an acoustical nightmare!

    My wife and I put moderately heavy window treatments up and carpet on about 2/3 of the floor in the 12 x 25 foot livingroom where we have our HT, but the acoustics are still terrible. The bass is mushy and the highs sound harsh.

    It pains me that I am not experiencing the true beauty of my Anthem/Parasound/Paradigm Reference system, but I have never had to deal with this kind of situation before. Where do I begin in analyzing and minimizing the problems inherent in this room?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Wayne
    I lived in a place like this once. You’re right, it is an acoustical nightmare. The reason is that there is virtually no absorption. The sound just endlessly reflects from one surface to the next.

    The only thing that can be done about it is a liberal application of absorptive materials on most of the floors and walls – wall-to-wall carpeting would only be a start.

    Of course, the question is how much you are willing/able to do in your particular situation.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Timber

    Timber Stunt Coordinator

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    Micheal,
    I have my HT in a small bedroom. Not nearly as "live" as what you describe, but still a lot of echo. My solution was to make sound panels. Basically just 2'X 4' wooden frames with acoustical foam like this cut to fit inside. I then covered the entire thing with fabric and hung them on the back wall. TA-DA... no more echo. I would say in your case to use fiberglass insulation board, as it is more dense. Or possibly a mixture/variation of the two. The frame/fabric are only limited by your imagination. I've seen people use the insulation board cut into different shapes, covered and layered to look like art. Very creative. Anyway, hope this helps. Good luck.
    Tim
     
  4. Lynn Little

    Lynn Little Stunt Coordinator

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    Tim has given you some good advice. One thing I might add is to use the "mirror" method to find your points of reflection.

    Let's say you sit 3/4 of the way to the back of your room. Have somebody slide a mirror along the side walls till you can see your mains. That is their point of reflection. Wall treatments placed in these areas should be more effective than anywhere else. Also, keep your mains away from side walls if at all possible.
     
  5. Michael_V

    Michael_V Second Unit

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    Great advice! I particularly like the idea of attractive sound absorbant treatments. My wife would never allow me to stick foam all over our livingroom walls! Anyone have any pictures of some of these to provide inspiration?
     

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